Author Topic: Bagging up loose change  (Read 103999 times)

Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #50 on: June 06, 2017, 12:42:00 pm »
I tend to use cash at my local corner shops. They much prefer cash as they get hammered in transaction charges from their banks when people use cards. I'm sure Tesco can suck it up and of course they have such a high turnover, so the charge on each transaction is very low. But smaller shops don't have that luxury....
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Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #51 on: June 06, 2017, 06:47:41 pm »
I'm trying to think where I use cash these days. Occasionally in the pub, but less so, everywhere seems to have contactless these days. Shops it's always cards. I did buy a cheese toastie at a market the other day. And then a sausage roll. Local taxis is about the only other place I routinely use cash.

What about the window cleaner?  And when you pick up milk on the way home from work?
Milk please, no sugar.

Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #52 on: June 06, 2017, 07:07:01 pm »
Or when you take your car to be cleaned by a bunch of illegal immigrants eastern European expatriates.... I doubt they'd take a card
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Kim

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Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #53 on: June 06, 2017, 07:09:11 pm »
Window cleaner?  Is that like fdisk?

Buying milk is why contactless was invented.

Cleaning cars though, that's just crazy talk.
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Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #54 on: June 06, 2017, 08:33:24 pm »
I'm trying to think where I use cash these days.

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Bagging-up came up in chat with a colleague today. He claimed some massive figure; he had cheated by chucking £2 coins(!) into his jar , but nevertheless depositing £1500 at the bank is quite impressive.  :thumbsup:
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Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #55 on: June 06, 2017, 09:13:24 pm »
Round this way the window cleaner pops a note through the door informing you of the fact that your windows have been cleaned and giving a sort code and account number to send the dosh to.
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Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #56 on: June 06, 2017, 09:22:18 pm »
I don't understand this thread. I just chuck loose change in the self-service tills in shops to pay for what I'm buying. Why collect it? What is the cause of this curious change-collecting fetish?
Some people don't actually ever go to a physical supermarket. Order online.
Is the change delivered with the groceries?

My corner shop has two self-service tills, BTW. It's convenient when we need some milk, or any of the other things that it's not practical to buy online.
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Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #57 on: June 06, 2017, 09:58:05 pm »
I use cash in cafés, pubs and taxis.

Much loose change ends up as a tip.

ian

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Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #58 on: June 07, 2017, 07:16:01 am »
Window cleaner is paid by bank transfer (as are the cleaner, garden, and the man who does stuff). Milk, I have cupboard-load of UHT stuff lurking in the kitchen and we don't use much as only I drink hot drinks and I eat toast for breakfast and her ladyship buys breakfast on the way to work to maximise her sleep time.

Cleaning cars is indeed the talk of craziness, that's what rain is for*.

Of course, one of the benefits of only occasionally going to the mothership means I loaf around at home and I don't have to pay to take things out of the fridge.

*OK, it occasionally gets cleaned by the men in Sainsbury's car park. But that's on my wife's watch as I don't drive the car and she only goes to Sainsbury's get a particularly brand of sweetcorn which she's strangely addicted to (salad crisp apparently, and it does taste nicer). Seriously though, she looks mental pushing a trolley with 24 cans of sweetcorn, two boxes of cat food (for the charity bin), and occasionally a bottle of gin, so I disassociate myself.
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Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #59 on: June 08, 2017, 12:21:10 am »
I don't understand this thread. I just chuck loose change in the self-service tills in shops to pay for what I'm buying. Why collect it? What is the cause of this curious change-collecting fetish?
Some people don't actually ever go to a physical supermarket. Order online.
Is the change delivered with the groceries?

My corner shop has two self-service tills, BTW. It's convenient when we need some milk, or any of the other things that it's not practical to buy online.

I don't know how "corner " your corner shops are but most of the ones I go in are the likes of one stop, that take contactless.
In my experience there's very few of the original quaint ones with a bell on the door, tubs of sweets with weighing scales and run by a little fella with a handlebar moustache.

Can't get much more convenient than just waving your phone at the till.
It is what it is. It's not what it's not, so it must be what it is.

Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #60 on: June 11, 2017, 10:04:44 pm »
So how do you collect change?

I was trying to draw attention to the contradiction inherent in suggesting that online ordering rendered disposal of surplus change difficult, & you've just replied by adding more contradiction. How in the name of all that's metal & spendable does contactless plastic-waving leave anyone with so much shrapnel that it needs bagging up & paying someone to take it off their hands?
"A woman on a bicycle has all the world before her where to choose; she can go where she will, no man hindering." The Type-Writer Girl, 1897

Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #61 on: June 11, 2017, 10:05:44 pm »
I use cash in cafés, pubs and taxis.

Much loose change ends up as a tip.
Rational.
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Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #62 on: June 12, 2017, 09:15:12 am »
So how do you collect change?

I was trying to draw attention to the contradiction inherent in suggesting that online ordering rendered disposal of surplus change difficult, & you've just replied by adding more contradiction. How in the name of all that's metal & spendable does contactless plastic-waving leave anyone with so much shrapnel that it needs bagging up & paying someone to take it off their hands?

You always have to make at least one purchase with cash to some luddite company, but if all the rest of the purchases are contact less or online, there won't be any use for the change that that one luddite shop generates.
It is what it is. It's not what it's not, so it must be what it is.

Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #63 on: June 12, 2017, 10:27:43 am »
A week or so back I finally found a valid and practical use for contactless.   We'd loaned a car to visit pa in law and used the M6 toll.   Contactless payment at the plaza made so much sense rather than fumbling with coins and / or notes.

We pay for almost all of our groceries using cash and we buy from small local concerns in the main.   Cash in the pubs, cafes and restaurants that we use, the bakery, etc. etc. etc.

I have a four bottle wood? Shepherd Neame carry out crate into which I throw 1p, 2p and 5p coins separated by the dividers in the crate.   In the fourth space I put filled bags ready for dropping off at the bank when I can be arsed.   It will keep my granddaughter's account ticking over slowly but surely when eventually get to the bloody bank!   ;D

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Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #64 on: June 12, 2017, 10:30:10 am »
A valid use for contactless is to reduce jersey bulk and weight on bike rides.
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Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #65 on: June 12, 2017, 10:32:46 am »
Whenever I fill my car up with petrol, I still get it to a nice round number, even though I'm obviously going to pay for it by card so it makes absolutely no difference. Just can't help it!

That's the filling station challenge, innit? It's either got to be a round number or something like £66.66
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Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #66 on: June 12, 2017, 10:44:52 am »
Oh good.  Not just me then.
I play the exactly  £10, £12.34, £22.22, or whatever, game too.  There's not much fun to be had on a filling station forecourt other than that.

One time it went wrong was when I proudly swaggered to the till having stopped the counter bang on 30.00.  Only they wanted more than that.  When I went back out to check, I  found I'd pumped exactly  30 litres, not pounds.   :facepalm:
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Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #67 on: June 12, 2017, 02:51:00 pm »
You always have to make at least one purchase with cash to some luddite company, but if all the rest of the purchases are contact less or online, there won't be any use for the change that that one luddite shop generates.

That's how it works for me too.  Don't want the change from the rare cash purchase pulling down my trousers indefinitely, so into the jam jar it goes.  I should make a point of spending my round pound coins before October, though.
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Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #68 on: June 12, 2017, 04:08:40 pm »
I rarely use cash now, and this means I have to hoard coins for the council-run car park at Waitrose, in 60p piles.

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Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #69 on: March 02, 2020, 01:59:39 pm »
£106 paid in this morning, including £26 in old pound coins. It would have been more (£32 more) but (a) I'd run out of bags and (b) it would have been too heavy to carry.

I rarely pay for anything in cash. Most of the coins paid in today have accumulated over the years (about 25) in different corners of my house. As soon as I think I've found and paid in all the old £1 coins, more come to light. Today was the third lot in the last year.   
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Re: Bagging up loose change
« Reply #70 on: March 04, 2020, 02:00:31 pm »
When I was a pso we counted and bagged a rag collection of £1300 of which around £30 was in (£1) notes, this was before £1 coins, before 20p coins were in widespread circulation and before the shrinking of the coins. I think over half of it was in 10p coins, I certainly remember turning up at the bank with a night safe bag containing £200 in 10ps in either hand.

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