Author Topic: Wearing a watch  (Read 80050 times)

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #450 on: February 25, 2018, 12:25:13 pm »
No, but I know someone with total loss of sight who uses a watch. I'll as him what he uses.
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #451 on: March 02, 2018, 10:39:39 pm »
He uses an RNIB approved watch. He says he’s not interested in the looks, but the practicality and its ability to withstand knocks etc.
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #452 on: March 03, 2018, 09:27:08 am »
He uses an RNIB approved watch. He says he’s not interested in the looks, but the practicality and its ability to withstand knocks etc.
I misread that as RSPB approved, and assumed it was matt black to make it less attractive to magpies.
And Darkness and Decay and the Coronavirus held illimitable dominion over all.

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #453 on: March 03, 2018, 09:37:45 am »
The RNIB approve and sell the Bradley.   What appeals to me about it is being able to tell time silently.  The fact that it looks interesting means very little to me but we all tend to like 'nice' things.

HTFB

  • The Monkey and the Plywood Violin
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #454 on: July 08, 2018, 12:42:51 pm »
I see the TdF coverage on ITV4 has sponsors aiming squarely at the posters on this thread. They clearly know their market.

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #455 on: July 08, 2018, 03:27:33 pm »
Got bored shitless of watchfinder last year. I hoped they were gone this year!

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #456 on: July 10, 2018, 02:09:40 pm »
I see the TdF coverage on ITV4 has sponsors aiming squarely at the posters on this thread. They clearly know their market.

They do. Apparently a good firm to deal with although they are expensive but they sell hard to get watches which command a premium

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #457 on: October 12, 2018, 02:31:23 pm »
Having not worn a watch for years, this has all changed suddenly and this arrived today:



https://www.goldsmiths.co.uk/Seiko-Solar-Mens-Watch/p/17401003/

Of course, being an environmental geek I had to have a solar powered one. Years ago - late 1980s I think -  I had a cheap, digital Casio solar powered watch. When I worked at HMCE it used to spend all day in the winter in the south-facing window next to my desk as otherwise the display would fade away. This one claims that 2 hours outside on a sunny day is sufficient to charge it for 10 months. That's impressive if true given that this has moving parts to shift about and the Casio didn't.

Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #458 on: October 12, 2018, 11:10:06 pm »
And it looks as though it has to go back. Date & day changing randomly. I'll let it sit for a couple of days to see if it settles down, but I think that's unlikely. Bugger.
Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #459 on: October 13, 2018, 12:18:46 pm »
Is that the Titanium version? If so I have a 15 year old model which is still working fine.
After its first 'charge' it's never needed any special treatment to maintain the battery.
“There is no point in using the word 'impossible' to describe something that has clearly happened.”
― Douglas Adams

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #460 on: October 13, 2018, 12:59:35 pm »
Being an engineer, I wear an automatic watch. With a ceramic case and strap. Brilliant in that it’s virtually scratchproof. Timekeeping’s ok too now it’s run in. Not as good as electric watches of course, but I’m astounded how good it is, maybe a minute a fortnight? 
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #461 on: October 15, 2018, 08:40:09 pm »
Is that the Titanium version? If so I have a 15 year old model which is still working fine.
After its first 'charge' it's never needed any special treatment to maintain the battery.

No, it's steel.

I tried setting it up again this afternoon and things appeared to be OK for a couple of hours, but then it advanced from 15th to 19th in about 5 minutes. I suppose I could be a time lord...
Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #462 on: October 15, 2018, 08:43:39 pm »
Try setting the sonic screwdriver to reverse the polarity of the neutron flow...
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #463 on: October 15, 2018, 08:49:40 pm »
It would stand to reason. I've always suspected your beard is larger on the inside than the outside.
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #464 on: October 15, 2018, 08:59:42 pm »
A Mech Eng here (and a fan of all things mechanical), and I've got thoroughly pissed off with a couple of slim, plain quartz watches. Batteries last no time at all. I was given a Seiko automatic when I was 18 and some bastard at Uni nicked it from my car when I was either underneath it changing the starter motor or (more likely) when I popped into my room to get something. Bastard.

Roll on a few years and cheap Casio plastic strapped watches came to the fore for all our sailing. The Sea Pathfinder is brilliant. It shows moon and tide condition and does all the yottie countdown things.

However, the itch was still there to get another automatic, so as a reward to myself for reaching a significant birthday and surviving the bastards that were my previous employers, and getting out with my mind still intact, I treated myself to an automatic Tissot, which is a delight to wear but so beautifully unobtrusive that no-one I know has spotted it. I'm well impressed with how accurate it is for a bunch of gears and springs. It's accurate enough to make sure I get to work on time.

Rust never sleeps

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #465 on: October 16, 2018, 02:48:28 am »
These are my watches. I tend to wear a different timepiece every day. The Suunto (extreme left)
is used for cycling and circuit training. I'm thinking of selling the Rolex Explorer II. Watchfinders has
provisionally offered me between £3050 - £3300. That would fund the purchase of a Rolex Explorer I.




Samuel D

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #466 on: October 16, 2018, 05:33:08 am »
I like the pilot’s watch with the big crown second from the right, a Vollmer I think. Which model?

That’s also a nice box you have for them to call a home.

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #467 on: October 16, 2018, 07:29:51 am »
These are my watches. I tend to wear a different timepiece every day. The Suunto (extreme left)
is used for cycling and circuit training. I'm thinking of selling the Rolex Explorer II. Watchfinders has
provisionally offered me between £3050 - £3300. That would fund the purchase of a Rolex Explorer I.





What's the one on the right that looks like a Rolex Explorer 1 ?
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #468 on: October 16, 2018, 08:02:41 am »
It's a Zeno Explorer. I bought mine in 2006 for £149. It has a Swiss ETA2824-2 movement
rather than a Japanese Miyota variant.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #469 on: October 16, 2018, 06:52:08 pm »
Well, after posting the malfunctioning Seiko back to Goldsmiths for a refund, I made the mistake of visiting Ernest Jones' shop in Saarfend.

Where they had this:



They don't have it any more.

I blame Hatler.  :D

One thing that struck me throughout this process is that watches have increased in size in the same way that cars have. It's not possible to appreciated this just by looking at pictures on a screen. Apart from its sheer elegance (I think it is anyway) its face is rather smaller than a lot of modern watches. I wonder how long they have had it in stock? The guy gave me a 10% discount from the RRP and I paid less than anywhere I've seen it on the internet.
Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

Samuel D

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #470 on: October 16, 2018, 07:03:48 pm »
That looks distinctly more expensive than the Seiko.

How big is the case? I’m also a fan of small faces for my own watches, in part out of necessity: I have very slim wrists for a man. But big is brash and many watch fans are brash.

As you might suppose from my one-bicycle stance, I’m a one-watch kind of guy. I have a silver Stowa Antea Kleine Sekunde with a 35.5 mm diameter case, although the face looks bigger because of the simple design. Lug to lug size is 44.6 mm. Sadly it’s currently in need of repair after I dropped it.

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #471 on: October 16, 2018, 08:27:56 pm »
Rust never sleeps

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #472 on: October 16, 2018, 10:33:19 pm »
My collection so far.



Clockwise from top left:
Timex Expedition Field Chrono, originally black PVD but stripped it back to brass
Citizen Ecodrive Avion. One of my favourites
Porsche 911 Essential. I know, fashion watch (it was a gift) but it actually wears quite well. You'd be mental to buy though. Much better watches out there for the money
Emporio Armani, another overpriced fashion watch (and gift). Gets worn with a suit, so basically never
Sinobi Diver Aliexpress special. No water resistance to speak of and while it's massive it wears okay (I've got big wrists and hands)
Citizen NY0045. The only automatic in the collection. Love this thing but the gold is hard to pull off. Would love to get the NY0040-19L version of this with the all steel case/bezel and blue dial at some point
Another Sinobi Aliexpress thing. Basically a quartz ripoff of an Oris Aquis. Got this and the other Sinobi as cheap disposables to practice reluming on when I get round to it
Casio Rangeman. If I had to keep one watch, it would probably be this. I know it's not only quartz, but digital, but it's just so comfortable and damn useful on a daily basis.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #473 on: October 17, 2018, 12:09:30 am »
That looks distinctly more expensive than the Seiko.

How big is the case? I’m also a fan of small faces for my own watches, in part out of necessity: I have very slim wrists for a man. But big is brash and many watch fans are brash.

As you might suppose from my one-bicycle stance, I’m a one-watch kind of guy. I have a silver Stowa Antea Kleine Sekunde with a 35.5 mm diameter case, although the face looks bigger because of the simple design. Lug to lug size is 44.6 mm. Sadly it’s currently in need of repair after I dropped it.

The face diameter seems to be 33mm.

Yes, it was a lot more expensive than the Seiko. I doubt that I will ever buy another watch though.
Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #474 on: October 17, 2018, 09:17:00 am »
One thing that struck me throughout this process is that watches have increased in size in the same way that cars have. It's not possible to appreciated this just by looking at pictures on a screen. Apart from its sheer elegance (I think it is anyway) its face is rather smaller than a lot of modern watches. I wonder how long they have had it in stock? The guy gave me a 10% discount from the RRP and I paid less than anywhere I've seen it on the internet.

This is definitely a thing. Watches used to be 37mm or so forever with sports watches being maybe a bit bigger. Then in the late 90s some went up to 40mm then 44mm and now some look like people strapped a station clock to their wrist.

Personally I like the smaller ones, maybe up to 40mm best. Probably just because I am old.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.