Author Topic: Wearing a watch  (Read 70127 times)

Mr Larrington

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Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #550 on: August 05, 2019, 08:30:00 pm »




That looks like it might make a worthy successor to my old G-Shock which firstly forgot how to cope with BST and then died altogether.  At the moment I'm back using a near forty year old Seiko which doesn't change date at the right time any more.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #551 on: August 05, 2019, 08:34:07 pm »
Good travelling watch as well as it does World Time. Press the top two buttons together and it swaps between two selected timezones. The hands and the digital display basically swap. When you get back to your home timezone do it again and they swap back. It has DST as well.

What I want is the functions of the Casio in a watch that looks like the Timex (plus a small digital display obviously).
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
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Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #552 on: August 05, 2019, 09:22:46 pm »
Just crossed the Mega-Global Big River Corporation of Seattle USAnia's palm with silver plastic.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Martin

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Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #553 on: August 09, 2019, 01:23:41 pm »
I'm one of those people for whom mechanical watches die (automatics are OK but lose too much time) and battery watches run out after about 2 weeks after having replaced the original.

I have a Seiko Kinetic which is fab but too expensive to wear out cycling and a Citizen Eco-Drive, both keep perfick time

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #554 on: November 10, 2019, 11:12:59 pm »
https://forum.tz-uk.com/showthread.php?460804-Now-that%92s-how-you-do-a-special-edition!-(VC-for-Harrods)


I must pop into Harrods next time I'm in London.  That's rather lovely. 
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

Wowbagger

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Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #555 on: November 10, 2019, 11:52:01 pm »
I'm one of those people for whom mechanical watches die (automatics are OK but lose too much time) and battery watches run out after about 2 weeks after having replaced the original.

I have a Seiko Kinetic which is fab but too expensive to wear out cycling and a Citizen Eco-Drive, both keep perfick time

I think for £75 that's hard to beat as an everyday watch. I bought one a year or so ago. It's correct to 1 second a month, but has the option of correcting itself every night if you want it to. My only problem with it is that the date is in MMDD format.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
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    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #556 on: November 11, 2019, 02:00:26 am »
I borrowed an old Citizen Eco Drive off Lt. Col. Larrington (retd.) for a while but it couldn't get enough light to keep it in electricity and kept stopping.  My fault for not going out enough, perhaps, but the solar-propelled Casio wot I have now seems happy with living indoors.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Cudzoziemiec

  • Dormant but requires tea
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #557 on: November 11, 2019, 09:04:53 am »
I borrowed an old Citizen Eco Drive off Lt. Col. Larrington (retd.) for a while but it couldn't get enough light to keep it in electricity and kept stopping.  My fault for not going out enough, perhaps, but the solar-propelled Casio wot I have now seems happy with living indoors.
The capacitor is supposed to store enough energy for the watch to run 6 months in total darkness, so that's odd. Do capacitors degrade over time? I suppose they do.
At some point in the ride, you might find yourself in Osaka with Spanish speakers where you had expected Edinburgh talking Greek. This does not mean you are lost, or even off route.

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #558 on: November 11, 2019, 09:25:13 am »
I borrowed an old Citizen Eco Drive off Lt. Col. Larrington (retd.) for a while but it couldn't get enough light to keep it in electricity and kept stopping.  My fault for not going out enough, perhaps, but the solar-propelled Casio wot I have now seems happy with living indoors.

ECO drives need a proper charging if they have been allowed to run flat. You need to leave it in the sunlight for 24 hours and after that it should be able to trickle charge itself OK.

Charging guide:

https://www.citizenwatch.com/us/en/recharging-guide.html
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #559 on: November 11, 2019, 09:43:32 am »
I bought a Timex Ironman for, well stopwatch duties and keeping track of time when kayaking. It is an ugly lump of waterproof plastic.

Since buying it, I've started wearing it now and then, just because it has reminded me how convenient it is to be able to check the time with a glance at your wrist (vs dragging a phone out of pocket, squint at screen, oh, I have to unlock it etc).

My daughter commented on "what a nice watch you are wearing". Shows how modern aesthetics have changed. Chunky lumps are 'nice'.

It is a butt-ugly lump. To a young person's eyes, it is an attractive watch.

Functionally, it is a bloody bargain. Easy-to use buttons, good backlight, actually waterproof for swimming down to a reasonable depth. Under £30.
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fuzzy (retd.) AAGE

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Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #560 on: November 11, 2019, 09:47:56 am »
I bought a Timex Ironman for, well stopwatch duties and keeping track of time when kayaking. It is an ugly lump of waterproof plastic.

Since buying it, I've started wearing it now and then, just because it has reminded me how convenient it is to be able to check the time with a glance at your wrist (vs dragging a phone out of pocket, squint at screen, oh, I have to unlock it etc).

My daughter commented on "what a nice watch you are wearing". Shows how modern aesthetics have changed. Chunky lumps are 'nice'.

It is a butt-ugly lump. To a young person's eyes, it is an attractive watch.

Functionally, it is a bloody bargain. Easy-to use buttons, good backlight, actually waterproof for swimming down to a reasonable depth. Under £30.

It takes the young a few years of living to develop an appreciation for true beauty and style....
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Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #561 on: November 11, 2019, 12:23:14 pm »
I borrowed an old Citizen Eco Drive off Lt. Col. Larrington (retd.) for a while but it couldn't get enough light to keep it in electricity and kept stopping.  My fault for not going out enough, perhaps, but the solar-propelled Casio wot I have now seems happy with living indoors.

ECO drives need a proper charging if they have been allowed to run flat. You need to leave it in the sunlight for 24 hours and after that it should be able to trickle charge itself OK.

Charging guide:

https://www.citizenwatch.com/us/en/recharging-guide.html

It used to spend its not-being-worn time at Fort Larrington in the bathroom, which has one of them light pipe things in it, and was thus in receipt of plenty of photons.  Didn't take long to stop when it was on my wrist, though, so I reckon it's probably fuXX0rd.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #562 on: November 11, 2019, 01:33:29 pm »
I borrowed an old Citizen Eco Drive off Lt. Col. Larrington (retd.) for a while but it couldn't get enough light to keep it in electricity and kept stopping.  My fault for not going out enough, perhaps, but the solar-propelled Casio wot I have now seems happy with living indoors.

ECO drives need a proper charging if they have been allowed to run flat. You need to leave it in the sunlight for 24 hours and after that it should be able to trickle charge itself OK.

Charging guide:

https://www.citizenwatch.com/us/en/recharging-guide.html

It used to spend its not-being-worn time at Fort Larrington in the bathroom, which has one of them light pipe things in it, and was thus in receipt of plenty of photons.  Didn't take long to stop when it was on my wrist, though, so I reckon it's probably fuXX0rd.

Yes sounds borked.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Salvatore

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Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #563 on: November 11, 2019, 01:54:36 pm »
I borrowed an old Citizen Eco Drive off Lt. Col. Larrington (retd.) for a while but it couldn't get enough light to keep it in electricity and kept stopping.  My fault for not going out enough, perhaps, but the solar-propelled Casio wot I have now seems happy with living indoors.

ECO drives need a proper charging if they have been allowed to run flat. You need to leave it in the sunlight for 24 hours and after that it should be able to trickle charge itself OK.

Charging guide:

https://www.citizenwatch.com/us/en/recharging-guide.html

It used to spend its not-being-worn time at Fort Larrington in the bathroom, which has one of them light pipe things in it, and was thus in receipt of plenty of photons.  Didn't take long to stop when it was on my wrist, though, so I reckon it's probably fuXX0rd.

Yes sounds borked.

Yup.

I've only once had to charge my ECO drive, and that was when it was new. I put it in direct sunlight in my car window while driving west along the M4 one summer's evening, so it must have been a long time ago, because I haven't had a car for over 10 years. It recently spent a month or so in a rucksack pocket and didn't require any charging. And that month without a wristwatch convinced me of the convenience of being able to know the time with a glance at my wrist.
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Kim

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Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #564 on: November 12, 2019, 12:25:22 am »
Do capacitors degrade over time? I suppose they do.

Depends on what they're molished from, but most electrolytics (which is what I'd expect in this sort of application) do.  They also don't like temperature extremes, and various forms of electrical abuse that aren't likely to happen in a watch.  The market was flooded with dodgy ones in the early noughties, as anyone who replaced motherboards will testify, which might be relevant.

ETA: But it appears that these watches use Lithium-titanate rechargeable batteries, instead.  Better energy density than a capacitor, and good for many more charge cycles than the usual Li+ chemistries, but they will deteriorate over time.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #565 on: November 12, 2019, 12:25:48 am »
You need to leave it in the sunlight for 24 hours

That sounds ...challenging.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #566 on: November 12, 2019, 04:42:04 am »

I'm one of those people for whom mechanical watches die (automatics are OK but lose too much time) ..
Not all mechanical watches lose too much time. If you service your watch regularly it should
fairly accurate.  :thumbsup:

Cudzoziemiec

  • Dormant but requires tea
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #567 on: November 12, 2019, 08:30:31 am »
You need to leave it in the sunlight for 24 hours

That sounds ...challenging.
It wasn't specified that the hours had to be continuous.
At some point in the ride, you might find yourself in Osaka with Spanish speakers where you had expected Edinburgh talking Greek. This does not mean you are lost, or even off route.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Dormant but requires tea
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #568 on: November 12, 2019, 08:32:09 am »

I'm one of those people for whom mechanical watches die (automatics are OK but lose too much time) ..
Not all mechanical watches lose too much time. If you service your watch regularly it should
fairly accurate.  :thumbsup:
I don't recall the mechanical watches I've owned in the past being noticeably inaccurate but they did all die or reach a point where the work needed to keep them going was more than I was prepared to invest in time, money and inconvenience.
At some point in the ride, you might find yourself in Osaka with Spanish speakers where you had expected Edinburgh talking Greek. This does not mean you are lost, or even off route.

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #569 on: November 12, 2019, 02:32:59 pm »

I'm one of those people for whom mechanical watches die (automatics are OK but lose too much time) ..
Not all mechanical watches lose too much time. If you service your watch regularly it should
fairly accurate.  :thumbsup:
I don't recall the mechanical watches I've owned in the past being noticeably inaccurate but they did all die or reach a point where the work needed to keep them going was more than I was prepared to invest in time, money and inconvenience.
My longest owned mechanical watch was purchased in 1993 and sold in February 2019 (for more
than twice it's cost price). Serviced every 4 - 5 years it was very accurate (+3 seconds per day).
Its successor gains +2 seconds per day. The other 4 mechanical watches I own (purchased
between 2007 and 2016) are all accurate up to > + 7 seconds per day. As with any mechanical
device, they need to be service on a regular basis.

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #570 on: November 12, 2019, 03:27:47 pm »
I’m wearing a 1960’s  hand wound Omega Seamaster, which I’ve had for 34 years.  It’s been serviced once in that time. Probably overdue some TLC!
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Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #571 on: November 13, 2019, 03:33:52 pm »
My Citizen EcoDrive (my 3rd) just works.  No need to put it anywhere bright, ever.  It just, well, works........

Brilliantly.

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #572 on: November 13, 2019, 11:23:34 pm »

I'm one of those people for whom mechanical watches die (automatics are OK but lose too much time) ..
Not all mechanical watches lose too much time. If you service your watch regularly it should
fairly accurate.  :thumbsup:
I don't recall the mechanical watches I've owned in the past being noticeably inaccurate but they did all die or reach a point where the work needed to keep them going was more than I was prepared to invest in time, money and inconvenience.
My longest owned mechanical watch was purchased in 1993 and sold in February 2019 (for more
than twice it's cost price). Serviced every 4 - 5 years it was very accurate (+3 seconds per day).
Its successor gains +2 seconds per day. The other 4 mechanical watches I own (purchased
between 2007 and 2016) are all accurate up to > + 7 seconds per day. As with any mechanical
device, they need to be service on a regular basis.

My current everyday watch is a Seiko 5 automatic I've grown rather fond of. Simple, not flashy, understated, utilitarian, good value. It gains 1-2 seconds per day. In my experience, for best accuracy, automatics need daily wearing. The stop/start of occasional use results in reduced accuracy.