Author Topic: Darwin Awards  (Read 23166 times)

Re: Darwin Awards
« Reply #150 on: February 23, 2020, 03:46:15 pm »
Did he not think that if a steam powered rocket was viable then the Nazis, Russians, USA etc would all have tried it. Also how can people believe the Earth is flat? Do they think there is a map saying 'here be dragons?
Flat Earthers seem to fall into three distinctive camps, the crooks, the self deluded and the stupid. The crooks are purporting to believe in a flat earth as part of a scam to make money from the gullible, they _may_ also fall into,the second camp but rarely the third. The self deluded will deny the science or evidence until they are blue in the face, whether they are stupid as well or just stubborn is often hard to tell; many of this group are religious as well and earth at the centre of everything point of view fits well with their narrative.  The stupid just don’t understand the science and are the main target of the crooks. For this last reason alone we should always challenge a flat earther because some people are being robbed.
Sorting my life out, one shed at a time.

Re: Darwin Awards
« Reply #151 on: February 23, 2020, 07:34:15 pm »
Did he not think that if a steam powered rocket was viable then the Nazis, Russians, USA etc would all have tried it.

The Germans did use steam powered rockets in a manner of speaking, but where the late Mr Hughes was effectively using a pressurised kettle, they instead used high test peroxide (HTP, which the Germans called T-Stoff).

The first method was a so-called "cold engine" where the T-Stoff was decomposed with an aqueous catalyst to produce a stream of superheated steam and oxygen to provide thrust. This type of rocket engine was used to power take-off assist packs and boosted glide bombs.

The second, "hot engine", method was to use T-Stoff as an oxidiser for C-Stoff fuel (a blend of methanol, hydrazine and water). T-Stoff and C-Stoff were hypergolic - that is, they reacted violently on contact without the need for an ignition source: 

Quote
The violent combustion process resulted in the formation of water, carbon dioxide and nitrogen, and a huge amount of heat sending out a superheated stream of steam, nitrogen and air that was drawn in through the hole in the mantle of the engine, thus providing a forward thrust of approximately 17 kN (3,820 lbf).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_HWK_109-509#Design_and_development

This type of rocket motor was used in the Messerschmitt Me 162 Komet and Bachem Ba 349 Natter interceptors.

The British used the "cold engine" type of HTP-fuelled rocket to power a scaled-down model of the cancelled Miles M.52 to test a number of concepts for supersonic flight. In doing so, it was proved that officialdom's fears about the safety of the M.52 - one of the excuses given for the project's cancellation - were unfounded.

Not propulsion in a direct sense, but a number of rocket engines have used decomposing HTP to generate steam to drive the fuel and oxidiser turbo-pumps*, and the X-15 hypersonic rocketplane used HTP "cold engines" for its reaction-control system, which controlled where the plane pointed at altitudes where the air was too thin for aerodynamic control surfaces to be of use.

* So in a sense they are "steam powered" on the basis that if the pumps "run out of steam", the rocket engine stops working from fuel starvation.
"Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster.
And when you look long into an abyss, the abyss also looks into you." ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Re: Darwin Awards
« Reply #152 on: February 24, 2020, 11:43:36 am »
I haven't yet seen a post stating that Mr Hughes will be mourned all around the globe yet, or at least not one from a genuine Flat-earther, but it's only a matter of time.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Re: Darwin Awards
« Reply #153 on: February 24, 2020, 12:21:05 pm »
One (among the many) problems with the flat earthers is where they think the money is. I mean if you're drunk enough you might imagine that big pharma, big oil or big tobacco might have an interest in suppressing knowledge/inventions that would interfere with profits. Big map will sell just as many maps of a flat earth as they do of a round one. No need to spend billions convincing the plebs that the earth is a different shape.
“There is no point in using the word 'impossible' to describe something that has clearly happened.”
― Douglas Adams

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Darwin Awards
« Reply #154 on: February 24, 2020, 12:33:47 pm »
It's not Big Map, it's Big Rocket.  Why should people keep paying for massive rockets when all you actually need is a ladder?
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Darwin Awards
« Reply #155 on: February 24, 2020, 03:50:49 pm »
It's not Big Map, it's Big Rocket.  Why should people keep paying for massive rockets when all you actually need is a ladder?
According to most of them you don’t need either because there’s no where to go. Even the saner of them that accept the sun and moon are separate objects still believe the flat earth has a dome over it. Indeed, the containment of the atmosphere is one of their favourite proofs that the earth is not a spinning globe.
Sorting my life out, one shed at a time.

mattc

  • n.b. have grown beard since photo taken
    • Didcot Audaxes
Re: Darwin Awards
« Reply #156 on: February 24, 2020, 06:31:42 pm »
What's that big thing coming towards me very fast ?/  It's big and round and ... it needs a name ...

(From memory.)
I wonder if it will be friends with me?
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

mattc

  • n.b. have grown beard since photo taken
    • Didcot Audaxes
Re: Darwin Awards
« Reply #157 on: February 24, 2020, 06:34:07 pm »
I haven't yet seen a post stating that Mr Hughes will be mourned all around the globe yet, or at least not one from a genuine Flat-earther, but it's only a matter of time.
"tributes are coming in from the 4 Corners of ... "
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

tonycollinet

  • No Longer a western province of Númenor
Re: Darwin Awards
« Reply #158 on: February 29, 2020, 10:33:32 am »
He left two children - so definately not a darwin.

Re: Darwin Awards
« Reply #159 on: February 29, 2020, 02:30:41 pm »
And Darkness and Decay and the Coronavirus held illimitable dominion over all.

mattc

  • n.b. have grown beard since photo taken
    • Didcot Audaxes
Re: Darwin Awards
« Reply #160 on: February 29, 2020, 04:34:00 pm »
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-51680049

 ::-)
Pathetic and tragic. :(

(and I don't mean because it won't qualify as a "Proper" Darwin, just to save those posts wearing out poor keyboards.)
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

Re: Darwin Awards
« Reply #161 on: March 25, 2020, 01:59:15 pm »
What is the difference between a Darwin award and karma?

Quote
A man in Rwanda who breached the ongoing lockdown to reportedly go fishing has been killed and eaten by a crocodile, the mayor of the southern Kamonyi district has told the BBC.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Darwin Awards
« Reply #162 on: March 25, 2020, 02:05:44 pm »
At 64 I suspect that he isn’t eligible for a Darwin Award ...

I didn't realise that there are qualifications or conditions other than death through heroic (or naive) misadventure. Do tell.

It's an award for people removing their stupidity genes from the pool. At 64 he's past breeding age.

The international concert pianist and chess grandmaster Mark Taimanov sired twins at the age of 78.

Quote
Mr. Taimanov was married four times, the last time in his late 70s. He was 78 when he and his fourth wife, Nadezhda, had twins, a boy and a girl. The twins were 57 years younger than his first child and 27 years younger than his granddaughter, although they were her aunt and uncle.
From NYT
Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

Re: Darwin Awards
« Reply #163 on: March 28, 2020, 09:44:59 am »
What is the difference between a Darwin award and karma?

I don’t know, but giving out too many of them might not help.



That said, events of late may get the printing presses humming.

pdm

  • Sheffield hills? Nah... Just potholes.
Re: Darwin Awards
« Reply #164 on: March 28, 2020, 10:12:12 am »
At 64 I suspect that he isn’t eligible for a Darwin Award ...

I didn't realise that there are qualifications or conditions other than death through heroic (or naive) misadventure. Do tell.

It's an award for people removing their stupidity genes from the pool. At 64 he's past breeding age.

The international concert pianist and chess grandmaster Mark Taimanov sired twins at the age of 78.

Quote
Mr. Taimanov was married four times, the last time in his late 70s. He was 78 when he and his fourth wife, Nadezhda, had twins, a boy and a girl. The twins were 57 years younger than his first child and 27 years younger than his granddaughter, although they were her aunt and uncle.
From NYT

The "record" in modern times is held by an american, James E. Smith who fathered twin daughters in 1949 at the age of 101...

The oldest mother in modern times was a 74 years old Indian woman (IVF with donated eggs) in 2016. The oldest modern day natural conception was in a Chinese woman aged 65 in 2019.

Re: Darwin Awards
« Reply #165 on: March 28, 2020, 10:43:31 am »
If I have related this little fact here before, apologies.

My maternal grandfather's father apparently sired 13 children. Nothing too remarkable in that stat, given that this was obviously some time ago. The :o moment is that these 13 all appeared after he was 65. (I'm not sure it's recorded if/how many he had before that age.)

My grandfather was apparently the last of the 13, and my mother was the last of his five (with a 21 year spread). (And I'm the younger of the two siblings.)

Net result: my great-grandfather was born before the Battle of Waterloo.
Rust never sleeps

Re: Darwin Awards
« Reply #166 on: March 28, 2020, 03:28:24 pm »
At 64 I suspect that he isn’t eligible for a Darwin Award ...

I didn't realise that there are qualifications or conditions other than death through heroic (or naive) misadventure. Do tell.

It's an award for people removing their stupidity genes from the pool. At 64 he's past breeding age.
One of my pet peeves is that the children of the second marriage of my ancestor Francis Funge (1618-1701, Waddesdon, Bucks) are wrongly attributed by many people to his son, also Francis Funge (1648-1717).

Francis the elder's first wife died in 1677. 14 months later, not long before his 60th birthday, Francis married Jane Carter, age not recorded & birth not yet found. They had at least two children, because two daughters are mentioned in his will who can't possibly be from his first marriage: Ann (my ancestor, married 1698 the same day as she was christened, aged 19, with both parents named, & her father called "Francis Snr"), & Mary "my youngest daughter).

Ann keeps getting listed in family trees online as a daughter of Francis the younger, apparently because the idea of a 60 year old 17th century manual worker fathering children is thought too improbable to give credence to, whatever the evidence.

Just one more, less extreme, example to add to the others given here.

PS. I've identified two of my ancestors who had 16 pregnancies: one had 19 children.
"A woman on a bicycle has all the world before her where to choose; she can go where she will, no man hindering." The Type-Writer Girl, 1897