Author Topic: Blood donation  (Read 26334 times)

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Blood donation
« Reply #175 on: November 19, 2018, 03:45:45 pm »
As others have posted, you make up the volume PDQ but make sure you do drink a decent volume after donating.

I used to feel under par for the first 48 hours and take 10-14 days to feel fully 'back to normal'.

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #176 on: November 19, 2018, 04:11:17 pm »
I believe the policy now is that you get a pint of liquid (water or squash, not hot drinks) before donating, which has been shown to be more effective for keeping blood volume up and having issue free donations. Plus the drinks and biscuits afterwards.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Blood donation
« Reply #177 on: November 19, 2018, 04:47:10 pm »
Makes sense, given the minor issues I had in the past!

Set off at high speed en vélo, felt faint, went to shop, bought BIG bottle of pop, sat on floor, drank it then set off...

...no issues thereafter....

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #178 on: November 20, 2018, 10:34:37 am »
I normally go to a spin class straight after work on a Tuesday evening - if I donate at lunchtime, would that be likely to cause any problems? (Or is this one of those "it depends on how you react" things...?)

They don't recommend it: https://www.blood.co.uk/news-and-campaigns/the-donor-magazine-autumn-2017/before-you-donate/

Quote
Exercise – don’t do any vigorous exercise or heavy lifting the day of your donation, either before or afterwards. Keeping your body rested helps it to replenish lost fluids.

I used to donate at lunchtime and then 35 minute cycle home later that evening (which felt harder work than normal) and then play an hour of 5-a-side football later that evening (again it felt harder than normal). Never had a problem but I guess I could have just been lucky, I'm reasonably fit so I may not be affected by it as much as some.

If you ask anyone today (Blood Nurse or Spinning instructor) they'll almost certainly err on the side of caution and say no, and to take it easy for 24h.

(The mobile donation truck stopped coming so I have to go elsewhere to donate now and can't fit in with work.)
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #179 on: November 20, 2018, 10:46:40 am »
There are two positive outcomes of donating blood

1) it's good for others and society

2) you get regular blood checks

Everything else about it is not particularly good.
I belong to the 5% of "selfish blood owners", my AB+ is not particularly desirable and anyone with my blood type can take any other type, which makes it next to useless

So I never bothered

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #180 on: November 20, 2018, 12:19:12 pm »
Everything else about it is not particularly good.
I belong to the 5% of "selfish blood owners", my AB+ is not particularly desirable and anyone with my blood type can take any other type, which makes it next to useless

There are lots of non-clinical uses for donated blood: https://www.blood.co.uk/why-give-blood/how-blood-is-used/non-clinical-use/

I belong to the 5% of "selfish blood owners", my AB+ is not particularly desirable and anyone with my blood type can take any other type, which makes it next to useless

Without enough "not particular desirable" blood there may not be enough for all of the non-clinical requirements given that the really desirable blood would go for clinical usage as a priority. Them having too much blood is not going to be a problem.

It is a free choice at the end of the day though, doing it or not doing it is up to you.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #181 on: November 20, 2018, 12:34:07 pm »
Actually 2.5% of the population in the UK... much more common in Korea, apparently

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_type_distribution_by_country

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Blood donation
« Reply #182 on: November 20, 2018, 12:44:38 pm »
I can't remember ever transfusing blood of the 'wrong' blood group in any non-(DIRE)emergency.

I think there are reasons why this is the case, though I don't remember them accurately.

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #183 on: November 20, 2018, 02:40:23 pm »
Well, it didn't happen after all! The pop-up blood donation place near work was too busy, and the only time they could fit me in was too late. :( Might give the permanent place in town (where it's possible to actually pre-book appointments) a go.

Adam

  • It'll soon be summer
    • Charity ride Durness to Dover 18-25th June 2011
Re: Blood donation
« Reply #184 on: December 01, 2018, 06:34:16 pm »
There are two positive outcomes of donating blood

1) it's good for others and society

2) you get regular blood checks

Everything else about it is not particularly good.
I belong to the 5% of "selfish blood owners", my AB+ is not particularly desirable and anyone with my blood type can take any other type, which makes it next to useless

So I never bothered

I'm AB+, and several times when I've been donating, the nurses have commented about how pleased they were someone with that blood type was donating, specifically due it being rare.  Over the years I think I've also had 2 or 3 pleading letters asking me to specifically make a donation due to them wanting more AB+.


I can't donate any more, so there's a vacancy. ;)
“Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving.” -Albert Einstein

Salvatore

  • Джон Спунър
    • Pics
Re: Blood donation
« Reply #185 on: December 01, 2018, 07:10:35 pm »
AB- "One doesn't like to hog it all"

https://youtu.be/zcZChdM0OiI?t=160
Quote
et avec John, excellent lecteur de road-book, on s'en est sortis sans erreur

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #186 on: December 02, 2018, 07:35:59 am »

I can't donate any more, so there's a vacancy. ;)

I cycle 25-30 miles a day to work and back... it's not a doddle ride at 10 mph around the flat streets of the capital. I can't really afford to have a couple of weeks of being tired and out of breath.
Slowing down means my commute becomes more dangerous, as more cars would take their chances at overtaking around bends... if I keep 20-25 mph they seem to be OK to wait until they find a suitable gap.

The vast majority of people out there do nothing physically demanding and could probably afford to donate blood more than I can.  :thumbsup:

Adam

  • It'll soon be summer
    • Charity ride Durness to Dover 18-25th June 2011
Re: Blood donation
« Reply #187 on: December 07, 2018, 08:44:41 pm »

I can't donate any more, so there's a vacancy. ;)

I cycle 25-30 miles a day to work and back... it's not a doddle ride at 10 mph around the flat streets of the capital. I can't really afford to have a couple of weeks of being tired and out of breath.
Slowing down means my commute becomes more dangerous, as more cars would take their chances at overtaking around bends... if I keep 20-25 mph they seem to be OK to wait until they find a suitable gap.

The vast majority of people out there do nothing physically demanding and could probably afford to donate blood more than I can.  :thumbsup:

Fair enough - that sort of speed you'll need all your blood.  At 15 mph commuting & doing long rides a few days later, I didn't really notice much effect.
“Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving.” -Albert Einstein

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #188 on: December 08, 2018, 03:09:12 pm »
Fair enough - that sort of speed you'll need all your blood.  At 15 mph commuting & doing long rides a few days later, I didn't really notice much effect.

There's more... my dad became a donor and a couple of years later he developed a heart enlargement that doctors could not explain. Eventually with therapy things improved, but it changed his life.
Sometimes I have this simplistic view of the circulatory system as "basic plumbing" and I can see how suddenly removing a large quantity of fluid from the system can damage a pump...

It's stupid, but it's there at the back of my mind

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: Blood donation
« Reply #189 on: December 08, 2018, 03:35:30 pm »
Fair enough - that sort of speed you'll need all your blood.  At 15 mph commuting & doing long rides a few days later, I didn't really notice much effect.

There's more... my dad became a donor and a couple of years later he developed a heart enlargement that doctors could not explain. Eventually with therapy things improved, but it changed his life.
Sometimes I have this simplistic view of the circulatory system as "basic plumbing" and I can see how suddenly removing a large quantity of fluid from the system can damage a pump...

It's stupid, but it's there at the back of my mind

Seems unlikely as there are thousands of donors and millions of donations are year.  If it does worry you, go and donate platelets. It takes longer but they put most of the blood back and you'll need to find a platelet donation centre.
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: Blood donation
« Reply #190 on: December 08, 2018, 03:35:43 pm »
Sometimes I have this simplistic view of the circulatory system as "basic plumbing" and I can see how suddenly removing a large quantity of fluid from the system can damage a pump...

It's not a closed system thobut:  Blood vessels change volume all the time to regulate pressure and body temperature.  Kidneys remove fluid to regulate the concentration.  The digestive system adds fluid as it becomes available in the bowel.

AIUI, never having given blood, the idea is to only take what can be compensated for by the normal mechanisms without affecting the blood pressure.  They get more than a bit twitchy if you exhibit signs of hypotension (as some people are apt to do at the sight of needles, irrespective of any change in blood volume).
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #191 on: December 11, 2018, 05:33:14 pm »
Fair enough - that sort of speed you'll need all your blood.  At 15 mph commuting & doing long rides a few days later, I didn't really notice much effect.

There's more... my dad became a donor and a couple of years later he developed a heart enlargement that doctors could not explain. Eventually with therapy things improved, but it changed his life.
Sometimes I have this simplistic view of the circulatory system as "basic plumbing" and I can see how suddenly removing a large quantity of fluid from the system can damage a pump...

It's stupid, but it's there at the back of my mind

As Kim said, it's not that simple.

Assuming you've not had a splenectomy your spleen will contract after a donation to replace a bunch of the red blood cells you donated. Your kidneys will hang on to a bit more of the water you drank before and after the donation to replace total body water lost, some of which makes up blood volume. All you're really missing then is some white blood cells and platelets that your bone marrow makes pretty quickly, and some blood proteins that your liver makes. Any weakness you felt exercising would be very temporary as the body homeostatic mechanisms put all this right very quickly.