Author Topic: Blood donation  (Read 31419 times)

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Blood donation
« Reply #75 on: November 19, 2013, 11:37:23 pm »
My lifetime ban still hasn't been lifted.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Eccentrica Gallumbits

  • Rock 'n' roll and brew, rock 'n' roll and brew...
Re: Blood donation
« Reply #76 on: November 20, 2013, 12:41:03 pm »
Tattoos are a problem. Piercings and tattoos are frowned on by NBS, so every time someone gets a tat, they can't donate for 4 months.
It's a year in Scotland.
My feminist marxist dialectic brings all the boys to the yard.


nicknack

  • Hornblower
Re: Blood donation
« Reply #77 on: November 20, 2013, 12:42:34 pm »
My lifetime ban still hasn't been lifted.

Not dead yet then?
There's no vibrations, but wait.

fboab

  • It's a fecking serious business, riding a bike
Re: Blood donation
« Reply #78 on: November 20, 2013, 02:44:47 pm »
Tattoos are a problem. Piercings and tattoos are frowned on by NBS, so every time someone gets a tat, they can't donate for 4 months.
It's a year in Scotland.
I read mrc's post and thought "it was a year when I had mine done, they must be more desperate these days".... but I was in Scotland then.
TSS is not Total Sex Score, Chris!

zigzag

  • unfuckwithable
Re: Blood donation
« Reply #79 on: December 18, 2014, 08:00:36 pm »
did my first donation couple of days ago (a combination of non-cycling season, blood.co.uk leaflet through the door and a bloodmobile nearby), all went fine. the next time they are around is in april, but i haven't promissed them on that.

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #80 on: December 21, 2014, 10:14:06 pm »
I'm really struggling these days and I've just about given up trying. I can't book sessions far in advance because I'm not normally sure where I'll be working on any given day until a few days before, maybe a week at most. My attempts during the last couple of years at booking an appointment this far in advance have been unsuccessful due to all appointments being booked. Twice I've attended a session anyway and it was most unsatisfactory, I felt like a second class donor with my form firmly at the bottom of the pile with everybody who had appointments going on top. The reason this happens is because at each session people come to donors having their drink and biscuit inviting them to book an appointment in 3 or 4 months time. So, all the appointments are filled long in advance, possibly in many cases by people who have more flexibility about when they donate.

I've given this feedback to the service and I was phoned back but they're unable to offer a solution and frankly don't seem too bothered. Happily, it must mean they're not as short of donors as their adverts sometimes suggest. Hopefully I'll be able to start donating again when I retire.

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #81 on: December 22, 2014, 10:59:33 am »
Thanks for the prompt, I had forgotten when I last donated and found I am now due to give again.

As I have moved house I have had to search for the next appropriate and accessible session, looks like the 24th on my way home from work.

Salvatore

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Re: Blood donation
« Reply #82 on: January 05, 2015, 09:35:42 am »
A case of the coughs, snuffles and sneezes means I've had to cancel this afternoon's appointment.

I seem to be stuck on 25. I couldn't donate in the autumn because of the heart palpitations in Germany in the summer. Or rather because of the time to check that the Herzrythmusstörungen shouldn't stop me donating. The NHSBT had to consult my GP and she (and they) had to refer to report from the Stadtkrankenhaus in Brilon, or rather my translation of it, which says I am perfectly healthy as far as their extensive tests could determine*. Anyway, eventually they decided I can donate and I have a letter which says so.


*coincidentally the report from the German hospital says the same thing
Quote
et avec John, excellent lecteur de road-book, on s'en est sortis sans erreur

zigzag

  • unfuckwithable
Re: Blood donation
« Reply #83 on: January 29, 2015, 06:51:45 pm »
received a letter today stating that i apparently am "uniquely valuable as a platelet donor" due to my a- group. i did some reading upon that and it's a more complex process of draining, processing and transfusion of blood. the nearest platelet centre is 12 miles from my home. any platelet donors here?

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #84 on: January 29, 2015, 08:35:28 pm »
That's interesting, I'm A-ve too and I'd never heard anything about platelets.

My donation last Tuesday takes me to 30.
What's this bottom line for anyway?

Mike J

  • Guinea Pig Man
Re: Blood donation
« Reply #85 on: January 29, 2015, 08:59:55 pm »
I've considered it but the platelet centre is too far to get to easily on a regular basis unfortunately.

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #86 on: January 29, 2015, 09:26:16 pm »
When I was a student, and local to the nearest platelet donor centre, I was a 1+1 donor. Basically a unit of plasma and a unit of red blood separated at the point of donation. It's slightly slower than normal but the chairs are more comfortable and it will always be by appointment so that there is a machine available.

Platelet donors need to be tested for their platelet count to be suitable. Its an extra vial when you give an ordinary donation. Because they are not taking whole blood a platelet donor can be more frequent than the 12 weeks for men.

The 1+1 is also the reason why I am nearly 70 donations, as for 4 or 5 years in Birmingham every donation counted as two, one red blood and one plasma.

ETA: unfortunately my nearest centre is now ~40 miles away so no go there.

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #87 on: February 02, 2015, 10:55:49 am »
I used to be a platelet donor in the late 80's (it was called white cell donation then and as far as I remember was mostly O- people). It involved spending a couple of hours lying down with blood bring removed from one arm, processed through an IBM separator and the unwanted fraction put back into the other arm. Most of the afternoon off work and a couple of nurses to chat to, what's not to like?
“There is no point in using the word 'impossible' to describe something that has clearly happened.”
― Douglas Adams

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Blood donation
« Reply #88 on: February 02, 2015, 12:14:21 pm »
White cells are not platelets!
Platelets are not cell but are needed for blood to clot.
White cells are mainly involved in fighting infection.

I think platelet donation is more common and possibly less time-consuming.

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #89 on: February 02, 2015, 01:09:23 pm »
Ta for the correction. It was a long time ago!
“There is no point in using the word 'impossible' to describe something that has clearly happened.”
― Douglas Adams

offcumden

  • Oh, no!
Re: Blood donation
« Reply #90 on: February 05, 2015, 04:08:03 pm »
I'm booked in for my first platelet donation in a couple of weeks' time, having been assured that 'creaming off' part of my vital juice does not constitute a threat to my status as a highly-tuned athlete  ;D

We shall see.

btw - to those above who complained of the needle insertion being more painful than formerly - I noticed the same thing a few years ago when they stopped routinely using an anaesthetic.  Apparently you can now request an anaesthetic, but who wants to appear a wimp ;)

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #91 on: February 05, 2015, 04:14:55 pm »
I've been a donor for 30 years and never been offered an anaesthetic.  I have noticed trends that appear and disappear.  A few years ago you were encouraged to use alcohol wipe stuff on your hands, just before you picked up the centuries old magazines  - that's gone now.  In the last year or two I've been frowned at severely for refusing their offer of a large drink of water before giving blood - I hope that disappears or they stop frowning at me.

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #92 on: February 05, 2015, 04:21:08 pm »
I'm fairly sure our lot threaten to not let you donate if you don't take the drink.

(Not a problem for me - I normally neck it, then get funny looks from the staff when I want another. The blood does seem to come out in double-quick time when you're well hydrated though, so I tend to make sure I've had a couple of big mugs of tea before going to donate as well.)

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #93 on: February 05, 2015, 04:32:48 pm »
I got odd looks on Christmas eve when they saw my cycling clothing, shoes, helmet etc. Before they stuck the needle in the the duty nurse was summoned to confirm he was happy. His face when I explained it was a 6 mile ride home and taking it easy I would be home inside 40 minutes...

I had to reassure him that I have previously utility cycled after giving blood without ill effect before they would proceed.

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #94 on: February 05, 2015, 04:39:31 pm »
The staff in the local mobile units recognise me now - last time they looked at the funny shoes a bit oddly, then looked at me, nodded and said "you've done this before, haven't you?"

I tend not to mention distance, just stick to "oh, it's only 20 or 25 minutes - I'll take it easy."

offcumden

  • Oh, no!
Re: Blood donation
« Reply #95 on: February 05, 2015, 04:46:57 pm »
When I asked about the need to have a large drink beforehand I was told it was not about being well-hydrated but to fill your stomach, which apparently helps to ensure there's a good blood flow by increasing pressure in the abdomen, or something.  Related to the buttock-clenching advice, I suppose!

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #96 on: February 05, 2015, 04:48:50 pm »
The staff in the local mobile units recognise me now - last time they looked at the funny shoes a bit oddly, then looked at me, nodded and said "you've done this before, haven't you?"

I tend not to mention distance, just stick to "oh, it's only 20 or 25 minutes - I'll take it easy."

I'd just moved house so it was my first donation at that location...

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #97 on: February 05, 2015, 06:52:29 pm »
I'm a platelet doner in Lancaster and usually attend every month.It takes a little longer than just blood circa 90 mins .The time passes quite quickly (read a book, watch afternoon telly, you are in a reclined position) .The staff are pleasant, thankful and keep you supplied with drinks and snacks .The feeling that you have done a sick person a favour is worth the time spent travelling etc.The Blood people are looking out for fit people to donate.Seems like a no brainer for cyclists.

arabella

  • no se porque yo no lo se
Re: Blood donation
« Reply #98 on: February 06, 2017, 09:30:29 pm »
younger guy just made his first donation.

I am A+.  one child is A- and the other is O+, so I can have their blood but they can't have mine.  This seems wrong, somehow.
In the dark, all views are the same.

Re: Blood donation
« Reply #99 on: February 13, 2017, 08:08:29 am »
I'm o pos, a useful blood to have since it can go in a lot of people. I got told 83% of uk population but that sounds a bit high to me.

Not sure of the number of donations but I've got a 25 to 49 card for a long time now. Stopped donating because of difficulty getting in. Appointments fill up and I've even been turned away once with an appointment. I'm afraid I've become annoyed with the service near me. Nothing to do with a case of stitched without anaesthetic giving me a phobia over needles at all. I have given blood a few times after that fear kicked in. Have never even flinched at having needles stuck into me until those stitches, even fought a nurse to watch a cannula going in. Nurses shouldn't slap your face away several times when you're a kid right? Still i got to watch the needle going in.

Anyway, what do you think the service should do in busy donation centres? Appointments for almost all so those who cannot guarantee being free have to make sure they're first in or no donation. What would you suggest they do? No appointments? Guaranteed donation even if they have to b stay late? More sessions in busy areas? More donation beds and staff? they've lost me years ago because of this. I wasn't even 40 years old so had potentially 30 plus years of donation left in me back then. At 3 times a year that's 90 pints.