Author Topic: Old pianos  (Read 18936 times)

Wowbagger

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #125 on: March 27, 2019, 01:47:07 pm »
"Silent" systems on acoustic pianos makes the keys marginally less sensitive, so I'm told. It is pretty marginal.

Feurich, as sold by Roberts, do fit a silent system. I think I played one of these in Vienna, where they are designed and some are manufactured, but I can't recall any particular problems with it. I played lots of different pianos in that showroom.

Bösendorfer have their own peculiar system which also records and the piano will faithfully reproduce the piece you have played. I've never tried this but it won't be cheap.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #126 on: April 04, 2019, 07:58:35 pm »
Thinking of old pianos reminds me of this clip:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vn-KEbvCckg

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Wowbagger

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #127 on: April 04, 2019, 09:17:03 pm »
Thinking of old pianos reminds me of this clip:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vn-KEbvCckg
Valentina Lisitsa is a wonderful pianist.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Wowbagger

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #128 on: April 08, 2019, 05:58:43 pm »
Yesterday Jan and I attended a recital/lecture in which the pianist was using an 1870-ish straight-strung Broadwood grand.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Old pianos
« Reply #129 on: April 08, 2019, 07:37:27 pm »
Is straight stringing getting trendy in a retro way?

Wowbagger

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #130 on: April 08, 2019, 08:53:36 pm »
Marcus Roberts isn't altogether against it. I think from a technician's point of view they are easier to work on, and whereas cross-stringing tends to improve the sound of the bass notes, he argues that the tenor/treble parts of the piano are where you play most of the notes and where those strings are longer you tend to get a better tone.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRUsieTk8Yw is informative.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Wowbagger

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #131 on: July 08, 2019, 11:58:12 pm »
https://www.robertspianos.com/ldetails.php?RP=2190701&make=Bechstein&model=7

That's an absolutely gorgeous instrument. My Bechstein, currently residing with my daughter, is a Model III, not so tall as the Model 7. The taller the upright, the longer the bass strings and the more resonant the tone. That video does that piano justice.

I played an even taller piano than that at the Bluthner showrooms last year. It was new, and I thought that the keys were heavy. However, I suspect that some of that may have become looser with playing. It had a lovely tone though.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Wowbagger

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #132 on: September 28, 2019, 01:13:21 pm »
I have just been playing an ancient Broadwood at Rufford Old Hall, Lancs. it is very similar to the piano I played a couple of weeks ago in a church in Rotherhithe, and also the piano used in a concert I attended in April. This one has wooden pedals, which makes me think it might be rather earlier than the 1880-odd that the staff suggested for its year of manufacture.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Wowbagger

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #133 on: December 03, 2019, 04:09:31 pm »
http://www.pianoauctions.co.uk/catalogue.php

I always take an interest in what is being sold and for how much.

Lot 74:

Quote
Bechstein grand piano (c1853) A grand piano in a rosewood case with carved scroll cheeks and leg supports; on turned octagonal legs and lyre pedals. This piano is believed to be the earliest known example of this maker.

 :o

Wikipedia states that Carl Bechstein set up shop in 1853.

Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Old pianos
« Reply #134 on: December 03, 2019, 04:30:20 pm »
Suspect David will wander off there. Hope he doesn't bid and returns to take me to vote...

Wowbagger

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #135 on: December 03, 2019, 06:32:45 pm »
I could drop in and have a gander. I did a couple of years ago when I was in the process of buying my piano. As it happens, Jon's trial has been put back to 12th December at Westminster magistrates' court. I could kill two (jail) birds with one stone!
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Wowbagger

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #136 on: December 05, 2019, 03:16:37 pm »


Not that old. A Bösendorfer Imperial Grand for sale in next Thursday's auction at Conway hall, London. Dated 1972, and expected to fetch about £20000. Count the keys: a full 8 octaves! I was under the impression that the 9 extra keys, all at the bass clef end, were either covered up* for normal use, or all black.

There are very few pieces that demand the use of the extra keys. The Bösendorfer company designed the piano for Busoni when he decided to transcribe Bach organ fugues for the piano. However, they do add extra richness to the harmonics when the sustaining pedal is depressed.

In my view, it's a strong contender for the best piano ever made. That photo looks as though it was taken in a concert hall. I don't recognise it.

*I suspect that that sloping part on the left hand end of the keyboard might fold over to cover the extra keys.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Old pianos
« Reply #137 on: December 11, 2019, 03:03:04 pm »
D will be off to view the pianos again today and will attend the auction tomorrow.

We have neither the money nor the space for another piano but....

I saw this https://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/13/garden/thinking-of-refinishing-your-own-piano-dont.html while doing some reading...

road-runner

  • is in Slovakia.
Re: Old pianos
« Reply #138 on: December 11, 2019, 05:36:43 pm »
I saw this ...

My goodness!

How about a yellow Samick Pop Art piano instead?


hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Old pianos
« Reply #139 on: December 11, 2019, 06:57:30 pm »
He's taken a shine to Lot 23, a 1924 Bechstein 6ft grand. I suspect it might need a complete rebuild as its estimated price is low. We've had our fingers burnt once with a piano of a similar age from elsewhere, at higher price. I just hope he doesn't bid for it or at least doesn't win it.

I REALLY don't want the 'Right Said Fred' saga we had with the Grotrian Steinweg!

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #140 on: December 12, 2019, 07:45:08 am »
Slightly off topic, but it's my Grade 8 piano exam today, and assuming it goes well, that means a trip to Ben Wheeler in Little London to have a look at replacing my tired 18 year old Yamaha Digital.
Eddington Numbers 125 (imperial), 168 (metric) 518 (furlongs)  111 (nautical miles)

PaulF

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #141 on: December 12, 2019, 08:24:50 am »
Slightly off topic, but it's my Grade 8 piano exam today, and assuming it goes well, that means a trip to Ben Wheeler in Little London to have a look at replacing my tired 18 year old Yamaha Digital.

Good luck!

Wowbagger

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #142 on: December 12, 2019, 10:00:43 am »
Slightly off topic, but it's my Grade 8 piano exam today, and assuming it goes well, that means a trip to Ben Wheeler in Little London to have a look at replacing my tired 18 year old Yamaha Digital.
Good luck indeed! What pieces are you playing?
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Old pianos
« Reply #143 on: December 12, 2019, 11:15:59 am »
Slightly off topic, but it's my Grade 8 piano exam today, and assuming it goes well, that means a trip to Ben Wheeler in Little London to have a look at replacing my tired 18 year old Yamaha Digital.

Good Luck!
David's gone to the auction; I don't know what will transpire. We might have some surplus keyboard instruments. You know where we are!

David has successfully eliminated an extraneous sound from the Kemble upright with silent system.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Old pianos
« Reply #144 on: December 12, 2019, 01:24:40 pm »
D did not get Lot 23, which went for £1000. I wonder if there are unseen issues.

Anyway, I'm relieved there's not turkey/white elephant in black, heading here YET!

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #145 on: December 12, 2019, 06:31:06 pm »
Slightly off topic, but it's my Grade 8 piano exam today, and assuming it goes well, that means a trip to Ben Wheeler in Little London to have a look at replacing my tired 18 year old Yamaha Digital.
Good luck indeed! What pieces are you playing?

Mozart - Allegro (1st movement) Soanta in B flat K570
This was the piece I found hardest after 40 years without piano lessons (I started proper study again in February) as it needed discipline (you mean I have to stick to a time signature) but actually went the best in the exam

Ireland  - Elegy from a Downland Suite
Right up my street and should have been my best piece until I made a horlicks of the crescendo at the end - but the rest of it went well.

Bartok - Allegretto (1st movement) from Suite Op 14
Great fun to play but it was a bit scrappy in places - hopefully the examiner will look at the substance rather than the form.

Scales and improvisation (its Trinity) went OK, but the sightreading was a dream - having struggled all year and been resigned to losing most of the marks on this bit, I got an adagio with no awkward chords and was able to play it pretty much intact and even put in a few dynamics.

So am now looking at the ACTL Diploma list - there are a few things on it that I've taught myself to play (not to exam standard) so wondering whether to take the easy route of brushing up past efforts, or leaping into totally new territory - fascinated by the idea of playing Regard de la Vierge from Messiaen's Vingt Regards
Eddington Numbers 125 (imperial), 168 (metric) 518 (furlongs)  111 (nautical miles)

Wowbagger

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #146 on: December 12, 2019, 09:33:33 pm »
Thanks. I shall have to look at those pieces.

I have concentrated so much in Bach, Beethoven & Mozart that I have never learned anything, or next to nothing, from some piano composers. I would include Brahms, Schumann, and Mendelssohn, and I have played very little 20th century music: I think just a couple of exam pieces, one by Bartok and another by Prokofiev. I have also neglected Haydn and Schubert, although I know the latter's Impromptus (Op 90) pretty well.

I have played a few of Chopin's preludes, and I have recently been learning the waltz, Op64 no2 in C sharp minor (op 64 no 1 is the Minute Waltz). I have recorded this for my pal Penny's birthday next week, but it is awaiting Dez editing out the mistakes!

Edit: if you ever fancy a trip to Saarfend to try out my Blüthner, let me know.

If you are preparing to buy an acoustic piano, the videos at https://www.robertspianos.com/ are very informative. I can't give Roberts my unqualified approval though, as there was a problem with my piano which took months to sort out and I felt their after-sales service was poor. There were mitigating circumstances in that one of their 8 staff, the second-in-command, was very ill and lucky to survive, but they didn't keep me properly informed as to why they were so slack in making good the faults on the piano (damper felts dropping off). They should have just dispatched another similar piano to me and taken the Bluthner back for the work to be done in house. It's lovely now, but it took at least 6 months of me tearing my hair out trying to get Marcus Roberts to respond properly.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Old pianos
« Reply #147 on: December 12, 2019, 09:45:30 pm »
<Things move slowly in the piano world> was told to David when we had MONTHS of tardy service from several people and places in 2015-2016.
This was a very costly and lengthy nightmare!

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

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Re: Old pianos
« Reply #148 on: Yesterday at 11:25:02 am »
<Things move slowly in the piano world> was told to David when we had MONTHS of tardy service from several people and places in 2015-2016.
This was a very costly and lengthy nightmare!

That's why I'm tempted to use a piano specialist who is based only a few miles from home.  Also wondering whether it is worth persuading Mrs CET that we should keep the ancient Yamaha digital for practice and ask the kind piano movers to take it upstairs to the spare room where there is a perfect piano-sized space....

Then I could get a purely acoustic device for the living room.

I'm beginning to think that pianos are like bicycles, where the number you need is n+1 where n = current number owned, constrained by d-1 where d = number of pianos that will result in separation...
Eddington Numbers 125 (imperial), 168 (metric) 518 (furlongs)  111 (nautical miles)