Author Topic: Readers' Instruments  (Read 48525 times)

nicknack

  • Hornblower
Re: Reader's Instruments
« Reply #300 on: April 10, 2019, 02:24:06 pm »
[ Instead bringing a trumpeter and saxophonist who were way too loud and rendered her guitar practically inaudible chiz. 
Ha!
Finally!!!
 ;D
There's no vibrations, but wait.

menthel

  • Jim is my real, actual name
Re: Readers' Instruments
« Reply #301 on: June 03, 2019, 12:48:38 pm »
Not a new instrument but thoughts on a new one. I know some of you here can actually make such things!

I would like to take a telecaster body and attach to it a suitably manufactured 5 string banjo neck. Would such a thing be possible? I think having the neck made is probably the only way to do this but the scale etc are relatively close so tuning etc should be possible.

PaulF

  • "World's Scariest Barman"
  • It's only impossible if you stop to think about it
Re: Readers' Instruments
« Reply #302 on: June 03, 2019, 01:07:37 pm »
Not a new instrument but thoughts on a new one. I know some of you here can actually make such things!

I would like to take a telecaster body and attach to it a suitably manufactured 5 string banjo neck. Would such a thing be possible? I think having the neck made is probably the only way to do this but the scale etc are relatively close so tuning etc should be possible.

No experience but I've seen where people have converted electric guitars to a tenor (4 string) guitar. The 3 issues I see are: 


  • scale length (which you identified);
  • the neck width since a banjo neck will be narrower than a guitar so you'll need to either have a neck that widens to fill the neck pocket, of course if you're getting a custom neck made you can specify that in
  • the strings may not be perfectly over the poles of the pickups so you may get a weaker signal. But since we're talking banjos that's probably a benefit ;D
To make intonation easier you might want to consider a 25.5" neck (Telecaster standard) - I don't know what length a banjo neck normally is - otherwise if you can't compensate with the bridge you may need to move it which will be messy.

PaulF

  • "World's Scariest Barman"
  • It's only impossible if you stop to think about it
Re: Readers' Instruments
« Reply #303 on: June 03, 2019, 01:10:26 pm »
P.S. Obligatory banjo joke



;D

menthel

  • Jim is my real, actual name
Re: Readers' Instruments
« Reply #304 on: June 03, 2019, 01:13:38 pm »
Not a new instrument but thoughts on a new one. I know some of you here can actually make such things!

I would like to take a telecaster body and attach to it a suitably manufactured 5 string banjo neck. Would such a thing be possible? I think having the neck made is probably the only way to do this but the scale etc are relatively close so tuning etc should be possible.

No experience but I've seen where people have converted electric guitars to a tenor (4 string) guitar. The 3 issues I see are: 


  • scale length (which you identified);
  • the neck width since a banjo neck will be narrower than a guitar so you'll need to either have a neck that widens to fill the neck pocket, of course if you're getting a custom neck made you can specify that in
  • the strings may not be perfectly over the poles of the pickups so you may get a weaker signal. But since we're talking banjos that's probably a benefit ;D
To make intonation easier you might want to consider a 25.5" neck (Telecaster standard) - I don't know what length a banjo neck normally is - otherwise if you can't compensate with the bridge you may need to move it which will be messy.

My Deering is 26 1/4 but for standard open G anything from 25 1/2 to 27 seems to work, at least that is what my research indicates! I think it should be ok. As for the pickups something lipsticky or railey might better suit but if I can use the tele bridge and get the string run correct from the headstock that might just negate any misalignment. I have been thinking about this for a while, I just don't have any manual skill to carry it off!

Edit: https://www.eaglemusicshop.com/prod/5-string-banjos/Gold-Tone-EB-5-Electric-Banjo-with-Gig-Bag.htm
This has a 25 1/2 scale length, so it is obviously possible!

menthel

  • Jim is my real, actual name
Re: Readers' Instruments
« Reply #305 on: June 03, 2019, 01:14:24 pm »
And as for banjo noises, it should make it sound basically like an electric guitar.  ;)

PaulF

  • "World's Scariest Barman"
  • It's only impossible if you stop to think about it
Re: Readers' Instruments
« Reply #306 on: June 03, 2019, 02:06:07 pm »
And as for banjo noises, it should make it sound basically like an electric guitar.  ;)

:)

Yes, my electric mandolin sounds pretty much like an electric guitar so I’d expect the banjo to sound similar but with the benefit of banjo tuning.

Joking aside I quite like the sound of a banjo. Have you head the new Rhiannon Giddens?

menthel

  • Jim is my real, actual name
Re: Readers' Instruments
« Reply #307 on: June 03, 2019, 02:53:07 pm »
And as for banjo noises, it should make it sound basically like an electric guitar.  ;)

:)

Yes, my electric mandolin sounds pretty much like an electric guitar so I’d expect the banjo to sound similar but with the benefit of banjo tuning.

Joking aside I quite like the sound of a banjo. Have you head the new Rhiannon Giddens?

I have not, I will give it a go later.

Re: Readers' Instruments
« Reply #308 on: June 03, 2019, 02:56:38 pm »
That Mr Richards has made a decent living playing a Telecaster with only 5 strings in an odd tuning.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

menthel

  • Jim is my real, actual name
Re: Readers' Instruments
« Reply #309 on: June 03, 2019, 03:09:21 pm »
That is the other option, cheap Tele, banjo strings and a spike at the 5th fret to bring the high G into the right tuning...

Would be a good proof of concept before doing anything drastic.

Re: Readers' Instruments
« Reply #310 on: June 04, 2019, 08:32:28 am »
Blimey.  How does Seasick Steve manage with an old hub cap and a bit of broomstick?

Steph

  • Fast. Fast and bulbous. But fluffy.
Re: Readers' Instruments
« Reply #311 on: June 13, 2019, 07:32:10 am »
Not connected with photos...

Noticed my old mandolin was sounding a bit dull on the A and E strings, and on inspection those have cut into the frets. It is just the first five or six frets, because I rarely play past second position. Thoughts/costs of fixing?
Mae angen arnaf i byw, a fe fydda'i

PaulF

  • "World's Scariest Barman"
  • It's only impossible if you stop to think about it
Re: Readers' Instruments
« Reply #312 on: June 13, 2019, 08:03:36 am »
Hard to say without looking. You may get away with a fret dressing but if they're very worn the dressed frets will be lower than the undressed ones which could cause buzzing depending on how high your action is set.

From the price list at London Guitar Hospital https://guitarhospital.co.uk/pricelist.php it looks like £40-50. That's for a guitar but a mandolin shouldn't be much different

PaulF

  • "World's Scariest Barman"
  • It's only impossible if you stop to think about it
Re: Readers' Instruments
« Reply #313 on: August 01, 2019, 08:40:26 pm »
I only went out for new strings



Andrij

  • Андрій
  • Ερασιτεχνικός μισάνθρωπος
Re: Readers' Instruments
« Reply #314 on: August 01, 2019, 10:22:01 pm »
Yes, dear, I did buy new strings.  Guitar?  No, that's just the packaging.
;D  Andrij.  I pronounce you Complete and Utter GIT   :thumbsup:

T42

  • Tea tank
Re: Readers' Instruments
« Reply #315 on: August 02, 2019, 07:49:27 am »
Got to have something to straighten them with.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.