Author Topic: My stolen bike  (Read 3724 times)

bobajobrob

Re: My stolen bike
« Reply #25 on: June 30, 2008, 03:52:42 pm »
It is not an act of theft. The chap who 'bought it off a bloke in the pub' has not legally purchased it, nor legally owns it. Despite whatever 'good faith' he may have had.

..d

Try telling that to the police when they see you smashing a d-lock off ;D

What are the rules on "citizens arrest"? Could you somehow use that to detain the person who is handling stolen goods (your bike) and the evidence (your bike) until a policifer arrives?

More than likely the police'd turn up and arrest both of you ::-)

Julian

  • samoture
Re: My stolen bike
« Reply #26 on: June 30, 2008, 04:01:44 pm »
Blip, me old chum, why do you persist in trying to reason with the unreasonable?

If some dodgy chap, who almost certainly knows full well his bike is stolen even if he wasn't personally responsible for nicking it, has your bike, don't go and talk to him!  What do you think he's going to say?  "Oh, sorry, old man - my mistake.  Do have back your velocipede and I sincerely apologise for the confusion."  No, he's going to tell you to f- off and back it up with violence.  Stick a sod off big D-lock round your bike, walk inside McDonalds and refuse to engage at all until the police arrive, other than to apologise and assure him that if it is indeed your mistake you'll buy him a coffee.  End of.

As to the rest of the floating dreg-ends of society - yes, some cyclists will be crap.  Some drivers will be useless cretins.  Some kids will be on suspiciously nice looking bikes.  But why does it always have to be you who approaches them to intervene?  Why do you always try to engage these people in dialogue?  You must know by now it's a fruitless exercise.  And, like Karen says, making yourself that unpopular in a local area is a big mistake.   :-\

Torslanda

  • Professional Gobshite
  • Just a tart for retro kit . . .
    • John's Bikes
Re: My stolen bike
« Reply #27 on: June 30, 2008, 07:19:19 pm »
See, there you go. If you wait long enough a smooth talking, eloquent lawyer will be along to say everything I said only ever so nicely and in such a reasonable tone.  ::-)

Thanks, Liz. I've been trying to tell him that for 12 months  ;D

luv'n'stuff

J
VELOMANCER

Well that's the more blunt way of putting it but as usual he's dead right.

ABlipInContinuity

Re: My stolen bike
« Reply #28 on: June 30, 2008, 07:45:57 pm »
What do you think he's going to say?  "Oh, sorry, old man - my mistake.  Do have back your velocipede and I sincerely apologise for the confusion."  No, he's going to tell you to f- off and back it up with violence. 

If I hadn't have been restrained at the time, the scumbag would not have cycled away on my bike with himself intact.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: My stolen bike
« Reply #29 on: June 30, 2008, 10:27:54 pm »
What do you think he's going to say?  "Oh, sorry, old man - my mistake.  Do have back your velocipede and I sincerely apologise for the confusion."  No, he's going to tell you to f- off and back it up with violence. 

If I hadn't have been restrained at the time, the scumbag would not have cycled away on my bike with himself intact.

And a crime against the person is, in my book, worse that a crime against property every time ... especially if it involves risk to yourself. These kids have probably grown up with violence and are likely to be quite good at it. Middle-class softies like us just aren't up to that sort of stuff, so don't get involved.

If the bike is yours, you can prove it is yours, if it's been locked up by someone else, and that person doesn't turn up when you are knocking their lock off it, I think you are probably in the clear. On the other hand, do you insure your bikes? Isn't the point of insuring bikes to take the hassle out of the situation as much as is humanly possible when some nefarious git gets his grubby mitts on your property?

We all know the anger, outrage and heartbreak of being burgled or whatever, but even if you get your goods back, the chances are that they are soiled in some way. Years ago, our garage was broken into just before Christmas. The contents of the freezer and my son's bike were nicked (he hadn't had it long and had paid for it himself). I felt bloody angry but consoled myself with the thought that whoever had nicked my Tesco turkey probably couldn't afford one of their own, or a bike as a present for their son, so I was unwittingly indulging in an act of charity.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

diapsaon0

  • Advena ego sum in terra
Re: My stolen bike
« Reply #30 on: July 01, 2008, 10:23:39 am »
I felt bloody angry but consoled myself with the thought that whoever had nicked my Tesco turkey probably couldn't afford one of their own, or a bike as a present for their son, so I was unwittingly indulging in an act of charity.

No, more likely he flogged them in a pub and used  the money to buy crack  ::-)

N
Advena ego sum in Terra

ABlipInContinuity

Re: My stolen bike
« Reply #31 on: July 01, 2008, 10:44:38 am »
<snip>

And a crime against the person is, in my book, worse that a crime against property every time ... especially if it involves risk to yourself. These kids have probably grown up with violence and are likely to be quite good at it. Middle-class softies like us just aren't up to that sort of stuff, so don't get involved.

<snip>

Said scumbag had already lacerated my face in order to make his escape (with my bike). I was therefore quite happy to bring him down.


The mistake I made was in procrastinating and ringing the police when I should have just ridden off on it.


In any case, it should all be over soon (that also includes the ongoing intimidation from the original robbery) as we are not holding on until the lease expires but moving as soon as we find another place that is suitable outside the area. Then this chapter can be closed.

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: My stolen bike
« Reply #32 on: July 01, 2008, 11:28:16 am »
Not read all the thread but got an idea.

I'd contact the police complaints as this was a violent theft and ask why it was not dealt with properly.

Wibble

Re: My stolen bike
« Reply #33 on: July 01, 2008, 11:37:34 am »
The only true solution is a Transit with false plates, shotguns and a trip to a very cold dark and deep lake but it ain't gonna happen.

A local Manchester cycling campaign were doing similar things a good few years back, with the blame pinned on gangs/drug dealers.  Nearly got caught after a particularly infamous hit (google turns up a some articles, if you know what to search for) but the police investigation never got anywhere.  The operatives involved left the campaign and a name change made the organisation respectable again.


Glad you're okay Blip.  +1 to the 'concerned for you' comments, tho if you had biceps as big as yer thighs it'd be the oiks I'd be worried about!

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: My stolen bike
« Reply #34 on: July 01, 2008, 02:42:13 pm »
Said scumbag had already lacerated my face in order to make his escape (with my bike). I was therefore quite happy to bring him down.

"An eye for an eye just makes the whole world blind." Mahatma Ghandi.

the full quote please..  an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth will make the whole world blind and toothless - I believe without google.

Re: My stolen bike
« Reply #35 on: July 01, 2008, 03:02:57 pm »
Who is this Ghandi bloke? Is he somehow related to Gandhi?
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."