Author Topic: Some pro teams are now using clinchers !! - Gotta be good for us too  (Read 4857 times)

UnitedHealthcare is among the few top professional teams using clincher tires.
As reported on CYCLINGNEWS.COM



Rig of Jarkness

  • An Englishman abroad
But pro teams have used clinchers in the past - I remember Chiapucci using them in the Tour.  I just googled Chiapucci and Michelin and found this...CycleItalia: Tire wars: Clinchers vs Tubulars
Aero but not dynamic

There was a team (forget which one) which ran top-end tubulars sporting Michelin Pro Race 2 decals a few years ago.  I would be sceptical of any reports that pro teams are using clinchers in a major race.

Rhys W

  • I'm single, bilingual
    • Cardiff Ajax
I don't know exactly why the pros drifted back to tubs, but I reckon the ubiquity of deep-section carbon rims was a factor. It's hard to make a decent clincher hooked rim in carbon apparently - or maybe it's just easier to mould a sprint rim.

There was a French company who made tubs who were part of Michelin, so I don't think was an extreme bit of rebadging (apart from making punters think they were riding the same tyres as the pros). I can't remember the name now...

Isnt it, teams using tubs, more to do with being able to ride with a flat when using a tub. So when here is a puncture the rider can keep riding whilst waiting for the team car.

Rig of Jarkness

  • An Englishman abroad
It's hard to make a decent clincher hooked rim in carbon apparently - or maybe it's just easier to mould a sprint rim.

Sprint rims are significantly lighter than their equivalent clinchers, presumably because they require less material.
Aero but not dynamic

Rhys W

  • I'm single, bilingual
    • Cardiff Ajax
After seeing a brand new pair of Mavic Cosmic Carbones on yesterday's wet and windy clubrun, it's clear that there's a massive market for expensive wheels that will never see a race. I'm guessing the typical demographic started cycling after clinchers gained popularity over tubs, and doesn't want to (or can't) mess about with glue and stuff. So even if they are heavier and more difficult to make, they'll sell a shedload of them!


I can't see any proof in that link that "Michelin doesn't make tubulars"

Ribble sell michelin tubulars.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

IanDG

  • The p*** artist formerly known as 'Windy'
    • My Instagram
I don't know exactly why the pros drifted back to tubs, but I reckon the ubiquity of deep-section carbon rims was a factor. It's hard to make a decent clincher hooked rim in carbon apparently - or maybe it's just easier to mould a sprint rim.

There was a French company who made tubs who were part of Michelin, so I don't think was an extreme bit of rebadging (apart from making punters think they were riding the same tyres as the pros). I can't remember the name now...


Isn't there a problem with them blowing off the rim on long mountain descents when the rims get hot from braking?

Quote
I was once informed by a Banesto mechanic that Miguel Indurain preferred a clincher on his front wheel for mountain Grand Tour stages since, as a heavy rider and fast descender, he put a lot of heat into his front rim when braking and did not care for the possibility of melting tubular tyre cement. To obviate the possibility of the clincher coming off in case of a puncture, the mechanic would fit extra rim tapes to build up the rim well diameter, to the point that getting the tyre on required tyre levers...



Read more:
   Slack fitting clincher tyre?  - Maintenance - RoadCyclingUK

Ribble sell michelin tubulars.

Are you sure?


David Martin

  • Thats Dr Oi You thankyouverymuch
I can't see any proof in that link that "Michelin doesn't make tubulars"

Ribble sell michelin tubulars.

Where is KidJambo when you need him? I think he mentioned Michelin moving back into the tubular market. A pro Race 3 service course tubular would have to be very high up my list of very nice tyres..

And careful use of the search function gives.. What new tyres would you like to see?
"By creating we think. By living we learn" - Patrick Geddes

IanDG

  • The p*** artist formerly known as 'Windy'
    • My Instagram
Braking Heat on Steep Descents

Although tandems with their higher weight to wind drag ratio have this problem more often, steep mountain roads, especially ones with poor or no pavement require so much braking that single bicycles blow off tires from overheating. For tubulars the problem is not so much over pressure than rim glue melting as all pressure sensitive glues do with heating. As glue softens, tires slip on the hot rim and pile up on the valve stem. This is the usual indicator that tubular tire wheels are too hot. The next is that the tire arches off the rim in the area just before the stem.
This is a serious problem both for tubulars and clinchers because most clincher tires, given enough time on a hot rim will blow off if inflated to recommended pressure. Pressure that gives good rolling performance (hard) while tubulars roll off from lack of adhesion to the rim. The faster the travel, the more descending power goes into wind drag and the better the rims are cooled. Going slowly does not help, unless speed is reduced below walking pace.

On steep descents, where rims stay too hot to touch for more than a minute, reducing tire inflation pressure is a sure remedy. However, tires should be re-inflated once the rims cool to normal. The blow-off pressure is the same for small and large tires on the same rim, it being dependent only on the opening of the rim width. Also, tires with a smaller air volume become hot faster than larger ones.

There is no way of descending continuously and steeply without reducing inflation pressure, unless there is an insulator between the tube and rim of a clincher. Insulating rim strips are no longer offered because they were an artifact of dirt roads that often required riders to descend so slowly that all potential energy went into the brakes and almost none into wind drag. These rim strips were cloth tubes filled with kapok, their insulating purpose being unknown to most people when they were last offered.

from here:

Descending by Jobst Brandt

Rhys W

  • I'm single, bilingual
    • Cardiff Ajax
Wolber is the tub company I thought were associated with Michelin.

And Ribble do indeed sell Michelin tubs, only 100 pairs released in the UK!

Wolber is the tub company I thought were associated with Michelin.

And Ribble do indeed sell Michelin tubs, only 100 pairs released in the UK!

Blimey!

Thor

  • Super-sonnicus idioticus
Quote
To obviate the possibility of the clincher coming off in case of a puncture, the mechanic would fit extra rim tapes to build up the rim well diameter, to the point that getting the tyre on required tyre levers...

He could simply have fitted Michelin clinchers to a Campag/Fulcrum rim.  You need a crowbar as it is.
It was a day like any other in Ireland, only it wasn't raining

David Martin

  • Thats Dr Oi You thankyouverymuch
Quote
To obviate the possibility of the clincher coming off in case of a puncture, the mechanic would fit extra rim tapes to build up the rim well diameter, to the point that getting the tyre on required tyre levers...

He could simply have fitted Michelin clinchers to a Campag/Fulcrum rim.  You need a crowbar as it is.

Too right - much embarassment on club runs when it takes ages to mend a flat.

..d
"By creating we think. By living we learn" - Patrick Geddes

It's true that Indurain used to use a front HP, exactly for the reasons described.

Quite a few teams have been sponsored by companies that only make "wired ons" tyres. They usually bow to pressure from teams to "make" (or more likely to have made), tubulars, especially for events like Flanders, Roubaix etc.

Some riders do buy their own "best wheels", or specialist wheels - usually riders who aren't in a position to apply loads of influence. Tubulars are then de-logo'd, to avoid upsetting the sponsor (see other thread on why sometimes tyres are de-logo'd).

Tyre manufacturers want to sell tyres, and sponsorship is about their marketing. Therefore teams will always have to use (or seem to use) what it is they are pushing. Tyres sell in large quantities, tubs are a much smaller and specialist market, and require specialist production. Which are sponsors going to push?

However, on a day when a rider is looking for the ultimate performance, what is that rider actually going to use?

Jakob

I've never raced, but in my limited experience, tubs offer superior performance and ride. For a given tyre-pressure, I think that tubs give a better natural suspension effect to the road.

Steve Kish

  • World's No. 1 moaner about the weather.
All of my racing was done on tubs, the best of which were Clements, now probably no longer trading. 

The sound of Clement No. 1 Seta Extras on a concrete road at 140psi was awe inspiring!
Old enough to know better!

All of my racing was done on tubs, the best of which were Clements, now probably no longer trading. 

The sound of Clement No. 1 Seta Extras on a concrete road at 140psi was awe inspiring!

Challenge tubs bear an uncanny resemblance to Clement. (but don't get into No1 seta extra territory) I've still got some Clements - I'm keeping them carefully but I doubt they'll last for ever. If I had some No 1 seta extras they'd be in bed with me!


Riggers

  • Mine's a pipe, er… pint!
<Frantically presses the alarm button under desk>

"Alright fella, you just stay calm. Help is on its way"
Certainly never seen cycling south of Sussex

IanDG

  • The p*** artist formerly known as 'Windy'
    • My Instagram
All of my racing was done on tubs, the best of which were Clements, now probably no longer trading.  

The sound of Clement No. 1 Seta Extras on a concrete road at 140psi was awe inspiring!

They made a nice sound on wooden boards too........

and then there was the 'ping' when you gave them a flick with your finger after you'd finished pumping them up.