Author Topic: Trees  (Read 18105 times)

David Martin

  • Thats Dr Oi You thankyouverymuch
Re: Trees
« Reply #50 on: September 02, 2014, 05:11:19 pm »
DSC_2897 by davidmamartin, on Flickr

This is a well known tree.
"By creating we think. By living we learn" - Patrick Geddes

Riggers

  • Mine's a pipe, er… pint!
Re: Trees
« Reply #51 on: September 02, 2014, 05:23:28 pm »
"Robin Hood". Get in! Yes.
Certainly never seen cycling south of Sussex

Re: Trees
« Reply #52 on: September 22, 2014, 09:59:36 pm »
Gherkin tree

Re: Trees
« Reply #53 on: September 22, 2014, 10:00:56 pm »
Good tree.

Re: Trees
« Reply #54 on: September 22, 2014, 10:04:59 pm »
Good tree.

Naturally.  Must buy another jar soon.

RJ

  • Droll rat
Re: Trees
« Reply #55 on: September 30, 2014, 10:31:32 pm »

Re: Trees
« Reply #56 on: November 01, 2014, 09:08:55 pm »
A scary Northumberland tree, only a little late for Halloween.


Re: Trees
« Reply #57 on: November 01, 2014, 09:25:06 pm »
Great tree, shame about the moles, though in keeping with the ghoulish theme of Hallowe'en!

Never did understand gibbets: moles are practically blind anyway, so how on earth are they supposed to be frightened by this?  Maybe it's just the heroic molecatcher advertising his prowess.

Again, a great tree!

Re: Trees
« Reply #58 on: November 01, 2014, 09:50:57 pm »
the gibbet was the way that a gamekeeper or under keeper showed he was doing his job back in the day of the great estates, all "pests" would be hung in a prominent place, this way his lordship would see that the pest control was being carried out without having to come into any unnecessary contact with the grubby keepers it would also advertise the keepers skill in his job to all who passed by,  there was also quite a healthy "trade" of dead things between keepers. Although not illegal it is naturally frowned upon these days and people who partake in this pointless exercise are advised that if they must hang the pests up to do it out the way of the general public, there are of course all the old wives tales about hanging shot crows up to scare off the living ones, hadn't actually heard the one about the moles tho' but I would imagine it would be to do with the smell rather than sight ? :)

Re: Trees
« Reply #59 on: November 01, 2014, 09:59:43 pm »
Aye, Widdybank Farm in upper Teesdale, which is owned by the Raby Estate, used to be festooned with the things. It was like dead mole bunting.

It's now some sort of outdoor pursuit centre, and they're not there anymore. I guess it didn't fit in with the caretakers-of-the-land image the Rabies are trying to cultivate.

Re: Trees
« Reply #60 on: November 04, 2014, 10:27:15 am »
"The Rabies" - I love it!

Re: Trees
« Reply #61 on: November 04, 2014, 10:57:10 am »
Gherkin tree


Dawn Redwoods have been quite popular in London as a street tree since the early 1980s. I'm not sure that whoever planted them had any clear idea of how quickly they grow, as these in Carey Street demonstrate.

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@51.5147843,-0.1139101,3a,75y,90.45h,102.87t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sDbl8FqkjxKDTgTlLzkmf1w!2e0?hl=en

There's a veritable forest of them at Canary Wharf.
https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@51.5035569,-0.0202161,3a,77.8y,105.75h,96.8t/data=!3m5!1e1!3m3!1suCXVDSQoYMsAAAAGOtraPQ!2e0!3e11?hl=en

LEE

  • "Shut Up Jens" - Legs.
Re: Trees
« Reply #62 on: November 04, 2014, 04:18:17 pm »
Aye, Widdybank Farm in upper Teesdale, which is owned by the Raby Estate, used to be festooned with the things. It was like dead mole bunting.

I thought Robin Williams was superb in that.
Some people say I'm self-obsessed but that's enough about them.

Re: Trees
« Reply #63 on: November 04, 2014, 04:36:16 pm »
I found a good spot to photograph this 50 metre tall Giant Redwood near Ullapool. There's a site devoted to redwoods in the UK.
http://www.redwoodworld.co.uk/picturepages/ullapool2.htm



Re: Trees
« Reply #64 on: November 04, 2014, 05:07:38 pm »
The A835 is lined with big trees close to the Lael Forest Garden.


Vince

  • Can't climb; won't climb
Re: Trees
« Reply #65 on: December 07, 2015, 12:02:21 pm »
216km from Marsh Gibbon

Re: Trees
« Reply #66 on: June 21, 2016, 11:01:55 am »
_1020278 by Mike Clampitt, on Flickr

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
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Re: Trees
« Reply #67 on: June 21, 2016, 11:12:50 am »


Bah!
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Riggers

  • Mine's a pipe, er… pint!
Re: Trees
« Reply #68 on: August 11, 2016, 09:20:26 am »
Cork trees in a garden we stayed at in Costa Brava recently.

Certainly never seen cycling south of Sussex

Torslanda

  • Professional Gobshite
  • Just a tart for retro kit . . .
    • John's Bikes
Re: Trees
« Reply #69 on: August 11, 2016, 08:12:32 pm »
Searches in vain for a picture of...

'Number 4. The Larch'
VELOMANCER

Well that's the more blunt way of putting it but as usual he's dead right.

Andrij

  • Андрій
  • Ερασιτεχνικός μισάνθρωπος
Re: Trees
« Reply #70 on: August 11, 2016, 08:42:31 pm »
Cork trees in a garden we stayed at in Costa Brava recently.



Here are some other Cork trees.


Fitzgerald Park
;D  Andrij.  I pronounce you Complete and Utter GIT   :thumbsup:

Cudzoziemiec

  • Waking up now, put the kettle on!
Re: Trees
« Reply #71 on: August 13, 2016, 05:00:32 pm »
I do not ride a great big Mercian, gangster tanwalls, fixed cog in the back.

Re: Trees
« Reply #72 on: October 23, 2016, 06:01:45 pm »
Some nice Autumn colour, this one's a Red Oak.


Aunt Maud

  • Le Flâneur.
Re: Trees
« Reply #73 on: October 24, 2016, 06:52:43 am »
Not a single tree, but a Hornbeam coppice with Oak standards at Cranham, Essex.

I used to play in this wood when I was 10 years old and it didn't look then like it does now, as it had been coppiced some 10 years earlier and was overgrown with underwood.

I went on a visit a couple of weeks ago for the first time in 40 years and there has been a startling transformation.



There's a distinct wood bank which surrounds the wood and has the bank on the inside and ditch on the outside, which is typical for coppiced woodland, as it would need to be fenced in. There would have been a hedge on top of the wood bank to keep the deer and livestock out so as to preserve the valuable coppice shoots. All the hedgerow species are still there and make for an interesting contrast to the Hornbeam and Oak in the wood.

Wood Bank.



OK you say, what's remarkable about all this ?....

Well, the woods around Cranham appear in The Domesday Book, and the Hornbeam stools are a good 6 feet or more in diameter with their centre having decayed away, which makes the stools look like they're rings of trees and indicates that they have been cut many times. All of the stems in the same ring share the root system and DNA as the original tree.

The railway from Southend to London (built in 1885) splits the wood in two, so the wood easily pre-dates that, and there's an even older faint wood bank inside the existing coppice, suggesting that it's an ancient managed woodland and easily several hundred years old. It just goes to show that a tree doesn't necessarily need to be big, for it to be ancient.

Large Hornbeam Stool.



Looks like it's more than ready for another cut and a bit of hedge laying.

Re: Trees
« Reply #74 on: October 24, 2016, 11:05:48 am »
Fascinating - thanks!