Author Topic: Compact Disc degrading  (Read 806 times)

YahudaMoon

  • John Diffley
Compact Disc degrading
« on: August 26, 2011, 07:39:45 am »
Hi. I sell a lot of 12" LP Albums on Discogs and have a very large personal collection

I have always thought about dealing CD's, I only own a handful of CD's DVD's, they have never been my thing.

Anyway I have Albums going back as long ago as the early 1960's The old flip back sleeve editions and they sound as good as the day they came out if they have been looked after. Even if they have fingerprints you can restore vinyl with cleaning products. Even washing up liquid works

I've recently come accross stories on Discogs of peoples horrors to get a CD out after years in the jewel case that the CD is unplayable, Totally degraded. Whats killed them is finger prints. Also they can degrade even if not seen the light of day and have a short life span. A bit like tape ?

The biggest killer of CD's apparently is the oils in a fingerprint reacting with the CD. No cleaning products can restore ?

Has anyone had these problems with CD's degrading in this way ?.

Thanks John

tiermat

  • According to Jane, I'm a Unisex SpaceAdmin
Re: Compact Disc degrading
« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2011, 07:42:26 am »
Not pre-recorded ones, but certainly with ones I have burnt myself, and not from the surface.

the edges tend to go first, and can be seen as the metallic layer peeling away from the plastic.

Having said that, CDs were sold to us as being indestructible. utter BS if you ask me....
I feel like Captain Kirk, on a brand new planet every day, a little like King Kong on top of the Empire State

YahudaMoon

  • John Diffley
Re: Compact Disc degrading
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2011, 07:45:37 am »
Hi. No these are not copies or bootlegs. Actual real ones. Your not allowed copies on Discogs

redshift

  • High Priestess of wires
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Re: Compact Disc degrading
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2011, 07:57:25 am »
The only verified incidents I've come across have been the result of a label side scratch.  The label side seems to contain fewer layers than the playing side, and is thinner as a result.  Scratches on this side can expose the aluminium surface, which then happily oxidises.  The BBC used to teach operators to handle the discs by centre and edge only just like vinyl, and always return them to their cases. Don't pile discs one on top of the other.  Other problems can be caused if the disc has a colour printed label surface.

I have a copy of a notorious edition of The Terminator on DVD, for which the company actually had to arrange for free returns and replacements.  The label inks migrated and crept round to the playing surface, causing the discs to be sticky to the touch and unplayable.  I never got round to sending mine back, but found out that you could just wash the whole disc with washing up liquid and lo! it playeth!  Mind you, I've not tried that recently - it may be in rag order in the box now.
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YahudaMoon

  • John Diffley
Re: Compact Disc degrading
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2011, 08:11:26 am »
Hi. Thanks. Yeah I've just discoverd not all CD's are the same (not copies).

They use different types ?

I think the rule is as you say. DO NOT TOUCH YOUR CD'S !!

nicknack

  • Hornblower
Re: Compact Disc degrading
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2011, 08:40:53 am »
I don't. I rip them to the pc and after that they don't see the light of day.
There's no vibrations, but wait.

AndyK

Re: Compact Disc degrading
« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2011, 09:04:36 am »
I store a lot of photographic negatives. I would never entrust anything valuable to CDs.

http://www.rense.com/general52/themythofthe100year.htm

Biggsy

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Re: Compact Disc degrading
« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2011, 09:24:03 am »
http://www.rense.com/general52/themythofthe100year.htm

That's about CD-Rs.  They're physically different from commercial CDs.
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CommuteTooFar

  • Inadequate Randonneur
Re: Compact Disc degrading
« Reply #8 on: August 26, 2011, 12:50:02 pm »
Hyperion record company were using a duplicator that made the substrate of an unsuitable plastic that degraded overtime. Hyperion will replace such discs free of charge.
 

Rhys W

  • I'm single, bilingual
    • Cardiff Ajax
Re: Compact Disc degrading
« Reply #9 on: August 26, 2011, 10:40:41 pm »
The only verified incidents I've come across have been the result of a label side scratch.  The label side seems to contain fewer layers than the playing side, and is thinner as a result. 

If you have a dead cd, look closely on the playing side while you press a fingernail on the label side.  :o

(Not sure this applies to manufactured CD or just CD-Rs, but it's an eye-opener)

Re: Compact Disc degrading
« Reply #10 on: August 27, 2011, 07:49:12 am »
http://www.rense.com/general52/themythofthe100year.htm

That's about CD-Rs.  They're physically different from commercial CDs.

It's also rense dot com. Your one stop shop for all things swivel-eyed, conspiratorial and David Icke related.

IOW ... it's the TROOOF!!!!!!!! they don't want you to know about. And it's probably run by 8' shape-shifting lizards.
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