Author Topic: Running a marathon  (Read 3363 times)

annie

Running a marathon
« on: November 30, 2008, 11:03:36 pm »
I know at least one person on the forum that has run a marathon or two.

Any tips for a first timer?

Edinburgh in May :-\

andygates

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Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2008, 11:07:40 pm »
Just halfs here, slow ones at that.  Marathonners tell me the full monty is quite different...
It takes blood and guts to be this cool but I'm still just a cliché.
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cometworm

Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2008, 12:15:18 am »
One thing. And one thing only.

Do

Not

Skip

The

Long

Runs.

Whatever else you do, or don't do, make sure you do the long training runs. They're amazingly difficult to get time for in a normal, busy adult's life, especially if you're a bit of a procrastinator, like me.

It's the difference between finishing with a sense of accomplishment and elation, and limping home after 5h 15m of sheer unadulterated misery. Speedwork, lucky running socks, hydration strategy, walking breaks, whatever. Nothing else matters. Do the long runs.

groucho

  • Humph!!
Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #3 on: December 01, 2008, 09:25:09 am »
Find a running partner for those long runs so neither of you dodge 'em.
Make sure your kit - shoes, socks, shorts everything is broken in before the event.
You will have 'tapered down' and will be feeling pretty fit but do not get carried away on the day by going too fast - pace yourself!
Drink plenty.
Don't worry when Elvis or the hippos overtake you. Run your own pace!
Don't keep up with that good looking bloke! Pace yourself!

Pace yourself!

Faith, hope and gluttony.........

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Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2008, 09:35:30 am »
Do at least one half-marathon race in preparation.  Try to fit in some 10ks too.

Do at least one 20mile training run.  And concentrate on building up distance (not speed) during your training.

Taper before the race.

Train regularly, but you don't need to run every day if you are cycling good distances.

Cut back a bit if you feel an injury coming on.  Stretch regularly.  See a sports physio if you think there are problems.

Enjoy it! 

annie

Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2008, 12:10:48 pm »
Lots to think about, thank you.

I regularly run 6-9 miles and a few weeks ago started to run 11 miles once a week.  I missed that 11 miler on Sunday as I was recovering from the audax on Saturday.

I intend to keep plugging away with the base miles, come rain or shine.  Cycling and the gym on top of that, also swimming and yoga. :-\

Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2008, 03:33:59 pm »
I've only done halves, and no longer run as it was affecting my hip.

However, I did manage 2 great north runs, and about 3-4 halves in training.

I learned this:

10 miles is easy, the last 3 hurt.

Getting tendons and joint's toughened up is the main thing to do when training. I did my runs barefoot, and it was easy until the downhills, then not having padding really took it out of my knees. I think it would have been a stroll if I'd worn good shoes.

The big events are very slow. If you want to run a 1hr50 in the GNR, you'd better be capable of a 1hr40 on a clear road.

You can do a half with no training if you take an energy drink or powder with you. But it is an awful lot easier if you actually train.

Don't try adding (white) maltodextrin powder to an ordinary bottle of water while running. Most of it will end up all over your face and you will like you've been snorting gack.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2008, 03:37:44 pm »
I have a better idea.  Don't run one, skate another one like Berlin.  Not only much faster and less strain on the body, but you'll be able to skate another one the next day, unlike most of the runners.  LOL, OK, just kidding.  I'm in awe of anyone able to run a marathon.
Your Royal Charles are belong to us.

Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2008, 07:45:56 pm »
I cant run for toffee but just wanted to wish you well in your training  ;D

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #9 on: December 01, 2008, 07:59:35 pm »
Lots to think about, thank you.

I regularly run 6-9 miles and a few weeks ago started to run 11 miles once a week.  I missed that 11 miler on Sunday as I was recovering from the audax on Saturday.

I intend to keep plugging away with the base miles, come rain or shine.  Cycling and the gym on top of that, also swimming and yoda. :-\

"Flexible you are"

annie

Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #10 on: December 01, 2008, 09:01:27 pm »
Lots to think about, thank you.

I regularly run 6-9 miles and a few weeks ago started to run 11 miles once a week.  I missed that 11 miler on Sunday as I was recovering from the audax on Saturday.

I intend to keep plugging away with the base miles, come rain or shine.  Cycling and the gym on top of that, also swimming and yoda. :-\

"Flexible you are"


You bad man.

Yoda?? :-*

Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2008, 09:22:43 pm »
Lots to think about, thank you.

I regularly run 6-9 miles and a few weeks ago started to run 11 miles once a week.  I missed that 11 miler on Sunday as I was recovering from the audax on Saturday.

I intend to keep plugging away with the base miles, come rain or shine.  Cycling and the gym on top of that, also swimming and yoda. :-\

"Flexible you are"


You bad man.

Bad man, you are.

Yoda?? :-*


FTFY :thumbsup:


All this advice can be applied to riding the LEL too. Especialy "Don't skip the long runs rides" and run ride at your own pace. Which are probably the most important. The eating and drinking should come naturally.

Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #12 on: December 01, 2008, 09:44:04 pm »
A few years now since I did a marathon  :(  Hope this is of some use to you

Get yourself a mag like Runners World.   You need to run a 10 by christmas then up the mileage for your long run by 1 or 2  a week until you get to 20 or 22.  Why did I buy the mag you ask?  Look at the events in the back and pick two or three which fit in with your schedule.  I remember doing events like Watford 1/2 marathon, Rutland mini marathon, Ashby de la Zouch 20 etc.   They are great events because you get used to 'race' conditions and you just feel so good having done an event and got a gong or a t-shirt.   

My regime after new year used to be:

Monday         rest day
Tuesday        progressed from a 4 to a 7 varying my runs home from work
Wednesday  progressed from a 6 to a 13 local road club evening run
Thursday       rest day
Friday           progressed from a 5 to a 10 mile run home from work
Saturday      rest day 
Sunday         Progressed from a 10 to a 22 (not inc the marathon itself)

Weekly mileages went from 25 in early Jan to 52 by mid March.   I then had an easy week, another 52, then taper off ready for the marathon.   In the week before the marathon I did a 15 on the Sunday, 10 on the Tuesday, 7 on the Thursday and nothing then until the event.   Don't be tempted to over train when you feel ill, and don't over carbo-load in the last 24 hours.   :)

Kit:  Get yourself another pair of shoes now and alternate them.  This way you'll have two pairs of shoes broken in and at different wear rates.  The benefit?  Well, if you have a shoe crisis just before the event you can rely on the other pair.    Get socks, shorts, singlets or whatever and wear them.  Get used to them.  Don't use new kit on the day, ever.

Oh, and get some safety pins and / or a tri number belt for your race number.

Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #13 on: December 02, 2008, 01:09:34 pm »
Everything PB said!

There are training schedules available on the RunnersWorld UK website and loads and loads of advice on their forum.

When I ran a marathon in 2005 I made sure I had run at least 18 miles in training 2 or 3 times prior to tapering.  These were hard but on the day of the event everything came together and reaching 20 miles was such a milestone there was no way I was going to let a mere 10K more beat me.   

The secret is good preparation and to just aim to enjoy yourself, no more.  You'll have an idea of a time but no use beating yourself up if it slips during the race.  Your first race is a personal best so you can always aim to beat it some other time!

Good luck. 

Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #14 on: December 04, 2008, 08:08:18 pm »
Is there a running club/Jogging club near you ? If so ask if you could train with them.11 miles is not that far of a half marathon,is there one you could enter soon ?Try to get used to drinking while running,its not as easy as it sounds.Gradualy increase the long run over the next 12 weeks up to aboult18 miles or so.Plus do another longish run of about 7-9 miles mid week if you can.Every 4 weeks or so ease off a bit.Run on grass ,parkland if you can.Carry on cycling its easier on the joints.Enjoy yourself :)and good luck.

Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #15 on: December 04, 2008, 08:48:24 pm »
I've done 4 or 5 half marathons, and 1 full.

Get your name printed on the front of your running shirt. Spectators actually bother to read the name and shout out encouragement directly at you. In the final couple of miles, the fact that someone is calling your name is a great spur.

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #16 on: December 04, 2008, 08:55:56 pm »
Even better - you can describe your mood as you run!

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Gus

  • Loosing weight stone by stone
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Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #17 on: August 06, 2014, 05:24:59 pm »
I'm going to bump this tread.

After loads of talking and fun this weekend with fellow riders from last years Africa trip,
I've decided that my next goal will be Edinburgh Marathon 2015.  :facepalm:

I have 9 months of hard training and weightloss ahead of me  :o
I'm not unfit but just overweight obese. Any good advice other than those posted will be appriciated.  :thumbsup:

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

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Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #18 on: August 11, 2014, 10:51:30 am »
I started running as a side line to cycling at the end of 2011 and ran my first marathon in 2013.  I still run, as a side line to cycling.  If that's your plan, then read on, if not, pick up Runners World.

There are three things that you need to run a marathon.

1) Aerobic fitness - as a cyclist you will be aerobically fitter than a runner, especially if you ride up a fair number of hills.
2) Endurance - ditto - because cycling doesn't bash your body about 100 times a minute as your feet strike the ground - you can ride for several hours and still walk afterwards - something that is very difficult to do if you run for such a length of time.
3) Have a good running technique.....

That's the hard one.  Now for my dislike of the advice that tends to be given by running magazines.  They assume that you are going to achieve (1), (2), and (3) by running.  But if you cycle 2 -3 times a week and you run four times a week you will have no chance for rest.  Also, if you run four times a week you will have a maximum of 48 hours to rest those poor legs (and the rest of your body) from bashing the ground 100 times a minute.  Also, on the shorter runs that they suggest you have more chance of getting away with a poor running technique and developing habits that will injure yourself.

For the running technique start off by getting the rights shoes.  I go to a serious running shop (Alton Sports) where they video you running and make sure that you have shoes that support you in the right way when you are running.  Second - follow the advice repeated many times above

Do the long runs. 

In fact, that is all I do. ( I have a long term injury where the tendons at the top of the inner leg attach to the pelvis (one of those things that generally go under the term a 'groin strain'.  Running makes this injury complain, but after four or five days its fine.  In fact running once a week seems to strengthen that area.  But that stops me from following the runners weekly approach of 4 runs a week).

Its on the long runs where you will get into a good balanced run.  You will also test those muscles which cycling doesn't reach, typically the ones that give sideways stability.  You will also find that that 100 times a minute bashing jars up the body and the long runs build the endurance that help you deal with that.  If you are just starting out that long run might just be 2 miles (that's where I started in November 2011), but then builds progressively from there.   I'm a few weeks into building up to my next running challenge, which is more than I thought it was going to be as they've upped the distance this year from 33 to 45 miles).    So this morning was a 14 mile run (after 7, 9, and 12 in the previous 3 weeks).  In my previous training pattern I would have dropped back to 12 miles next week and then progressed with 14, 17, and 19, to gradually build up my body's tolerance to running and deal with point 3 above, but this time, knowing my running legs a bit better, will progress to 17 next weekend.

The final bit is stretching.  I'm not a big one for stretching after a bike ride but am very discipline after running - because of the 100 bashes a minute factor the legs can get quite badly jarred and the muscles tense up accordingly.  So this morning after nearly two hours running I spent 25 minutes stretching.  Mostly hamstring and quad stretches, a few calf stretches, some specialised stretches taught to me by a physio for my dodgy groin and then a foam roller to ease out the tension in the IT band (that bit that goes down the side of the leg and isn't used much in cycling but is critical for running).

But running will still be a sideline to cycling - the big goal is Paris-Brest-Paris in 2015.
Eddington Numbers 125 (imperial), 170 (metric) 520 (furlongs)  112 (nautical miles)

Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #19 on: August 11, 2014, 10:56:02 am »
Stretching and warm up before running too.   All too easy to get a strain after a few minutes running which puts you out for a couple of weeks.

Gus

  • Loosing weight stone by stone
    • We will return
Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #20 on: August 14, 2014, 08:14:11 am »
Thanks for the advices  :thumbsup:

I'm stretching several times a day at present, getting back into my routine with stretching before meditating to easy the the body.
Right now I'm walking for ~5 minutes then jogging a couple of minutes before trying to up the speed to actually run.

Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #21 on: August 14, 2014, 08:23:40 am »
Personally I would never jog.  Walk or run at whatever pace you can manage.   It doesn't take many weeks to get to 5k continuous running just by persisting but not overdoing it.

Tip:  Don't time yourself until you can run 5k without stopping.   You'll just be heaping pressure and expectation upon yourself.

Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #22 on: August 14, 2014, 09:11:24 am »
My tips from training for a marathon in April:
  • Vaseline. You'll find out where chafes during your long training runs. Applying vaseline once it starts to hurt helps to prevent it getting too much worse, but if you know where you chafe, then applying before (and reapply during) the run will make things a lot more pleasant.
  • Run slower in order to sort your breathing out. This was the hardest part for me. Find a comfortable rhythm.
  • Wait a couple of hours after eating before running. Your insides may be more settled than mine.
  • Eat early on the long runs to avoid hitting the wall.
  • Make sure your trainers are big enough. Mine were fine for the 20 mile run, but I lost a couple of toenails following the event itself.
  • Get a training plan like those on the Hal Higdon website. They tend to assume you have a baseline of running fitness. I didn't, and built up my runs for 2 months prior to starting the plan. I intended to start the plan being able to run 10miles. I only got to about 8 and it was hard work.
  • It's mostly a mind game. You can run much further without stopping if you have the will power.
  • Walk if you have to, but try not to walk for too long because starting to run again will be really difficult.
  • Having a training partner was very motivational. I think I'd have cut short or sacked off some of the long runs otherwise.
All the best! Crossing the finishing line was an awesome feeling!


Gus

  • Loosing weight stone by stone
    • We will return
Re: Running a marathon
« Reply #24 on: August 14, 2014, 07:16:41 pm »
Thanks again for the advices.

  • I've found a 30 week program for marathon, that means I've got 8 weeks to get my body use to running up to 5 miles. I do not consider that to be a problem.
  • Running partner : Hard to get, I work on all hours  :sick: But I have a couple of possiblities I can contact and hope the will run with me from time to time.
  • Vaseline - I know the tricks from my army days
  • Mindgame - My motivation is : Sometimes I feel like giving up, then I remember I have a lot of motherfuckers to prove wrong. Giving up is not an option, Injury is not giving up !!
  • Chris S I'll try to find that book