Author Topic: Stopping smoking: when?  (Read 49059 times)

Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #175 on: February 22, 2011, 03:00:05 am »
Seeing a close relative die of cancer didn't work for me but when I started to feel unusual pains in my chest I stopped rather quickly and bought a new bike with my savings :thumbsup:
"100% PURE FREAKING AWESOME"

Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #176 on: February 22, 2011, 08:25:59 am »
at the end of the day you really have to want to pack up at a deep level in your mind to succeed. At least that's what I found. You really have to get to the point where you know the game's up. The party's over.

It is that simple finally.  If you don't have that deep "need" to give up then you won't succeed, so there's no real point in "trying".  You'll just put yourself (and others) through a lot of hardship during the on/off process to no end.  Remember, it's within your power to control this, but you need to be tough mentally.  The "just have one fag every few days" for whatever reason definitely won't work though. :hand:

The physical effects aren't particularly bad (at least they weren't for me - 40 a day for 30 years) - in fact giving up caffeine was more unpleasant!

Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #177 on: February 22, 2011, 08:34:26 am »
I have a son (18) who smokes. Any ideas how to stop him doing it?
In Boris we trust.

Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #178 on: February 22, 2011, 08:39:42 am »
I have a son (18) who smokes. Any ideas how to stop him doing it?

Wait until he decides to stop, then support him when he does. It's the waiting that's hard. Mrs S still smokes, shows no sign of stopping, and I've been waiting 9 years for her to stop now (I didn't qualify for an opinion before that because I smoked too) and it's tough.

itsbruce

  • Lavender Bike Menace
Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #179 on: February 22, 2011, 11:45:32 am »
I have a son (18) who smokes. Any ideas how to stop him doing it?

Take an active interest in smoking.  Subscribe to smoking magazines, eulogise about the coolness of it, smoke trendy cigars and cigarette brands yourself, invest in a Shisha pipe.  When he has his friends round and they go out for a smoke, go with them and join in; offer them some of your Ducados (Spanish black tobacco, makes your mouth go numb and your breath smell of manure).  You'll probably put them all off and their grateful parents can help you with your own recovery process.
I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked: Allen Ginsberg
The best minds of my generation are thinking about how to make people click ads: Jeff Hammerbacher

Pancho

  • لَا أَعْبُدُ مَا تَعْبُدُونَ
Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #180 on: February 22, 2011, 05:13:39 pm »
I've been off the fags for a while now. Hate it, to be honest.

I don't remember much in the way of physical withdrawal symptoms - or even psychological symptoms. Just don't like being a non-smoker - bunch of killjoy goody-goodies. I've always been very suspicious of clean living types; I imagine them watching homo erotic Nazi fitness propaganda films in the evenings.

OTOH, I do appreciate not having to skulk around the bins and the tax-avoidance aspect of giving up is heartwarming so it's not entirely bad, I suppose.

Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #181 on: February 23, 2011, 08:21:05 pm »
It is that simple finally.  If you don't have that deep "need" to give up then you won't succeed, so there's no real point in "trying".  You'll just put yourself (and others) through a lot of hardship during the on/off process to no end.  Remember, it's within your power to control this, but you need to be tough mentally

I think I am ambivalent about stopping. But I've realised that there will never be a time when I am not at least slightly ambivalent - there is no point in waiting for that to happen.

I've been off the fags for a while now. Hate it, to be honest.

I don't remember much in the way of physical withdrawal symptoms - or even psychological symptoms. Just don't like being a non-smoker - bunch of killjoy goody-goodies. I've always been very suspicious of clean living types; I imagine them watching homo erotic Nazi fitness propaganda films in the evenings

your thinking is very close to mine. Part of my ambivalence comes from this natural dislike of being a "killjoy goody-goody", and a disbelief that I could be turning out to be not only a non-drinker but a non-smoker too  :-\ 

CrinklyLion

  • The one with devious, cake-pushing ways....
Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #182 on: February 23, 2011, 08:28:14 pm »
Part of my ambivalence comes from this natural dislike of being a "killjoy goody-goody", and a disbelief that I could be turning out to be not only a non-drinker but a non-smoker too  :-\  

Don't worry - we'd still like you even in the extremely unlikely event that you did turn out to be a 'killjoy goody-goody'  :)

Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #183 on: February 23, 2011, 08:29:36 pm »
if you're ambivalent I can absolutely guarantee you won't be able to give up so I'm not exactly sure why you are giving yourself a hard time by "trying".

The consistent message from this thread that you will only give up when the time is right for you.  From your last couple of posts it's pretty clear that you aren't at that stage yet so why not just enjoy the tabs until/if you reach the given time.

Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #184 on: February 23, 2011, 08:35:57 pm »
if you're ambivalent I can guarantee you won't be able to give up so I'm not exactly sure why you are giving yourself a hard time in "trying".

I don't completely agree with that.

It depends on how you think of it. If you need to do the whole "I'll never smoke EVER again!" then yes, that leaves little room for ambivalence. But stopping incrementally like I did, half a day, then a day, then a week at a time, there's more room for ambivalence - there's more slack in the regime.

It's a process, during which you gradually convince yourself that the change you are asking for, is possible.

Pancho

  • لَا أَعْبُدُ مَا تَعْبُدُونَ
Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #185 on: February 23, 2011, 08:38:44 pm »
if you're ambivalent I can absolutely guarantee you won't be able to give up so I'm not exactly sure why you are giving yourself a hard time by "trying".

I was (and am) ambivalent about quitting but I haven't lit up for some time - I am continually surprised that I'm not smoking.

But even when I smoked heavily, I always used to give up once a year (choose religious fast of your preference) - just to prove to myself that I wasn't totally enslaved.

Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #186 on: February 23, 2011, 08:38:57 pm »
I haven't turned into a killjoy goody-goody - I might have been a bit of a git when I was trying to quit, but a couple of years later, I don't evangelise about stopping smoking, or lecture people who smoke around me.  Well, except when smokers block pub doorways.

I figured it was about freedom of choice - I (eventually) quit when I wanted to, but that didn't mean everyone else had to.  

Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #187 on: February 23, 2011, 08:41:42 pm »
I haven't turned into a killjoy goody-goody

Me neither. But not a day goes by when I don't thank myself for going through the pain to get where I am now. March 26th will be 9 years  :thumbsup:.

fboab

  • It's a fecking serious business, riding a bike
Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #188 on: February 23, 2011, 09:40:14 pm »
I work on the principle that if the world is divided into smokers and non-smokers, I'd fall into the smoking half.

I'm just not doing it at the moment. And haven't for the last 3 years. And have no plans to, for the foreseeable.

TSS is not Total Sex Score, Chris!

Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #189 on: February 23, 2011, 10:42:17 pm »
I was fairly ambivalent about giving up when I did - it took a few years for me to be definite about it.
Quote from: Kim
^ This woman knows what she's talking about.

Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #190 on: February 23, 2011, 10:50:53 pm »
I work on the principle that if the world is divided into smokers and non-smokers, I'd fall into the smoking half.

I'm just not doing it at the moment. And haven't for the last 3 years. And have no plans to, for the foreseeable.

Exactly. I hated the Allen Carr crap about "You're already a non-smoker!". No, I'm (currently) an ex-smoker. I can't ever be a non-smoker again.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

itsbruce

  • Lavender Bike Menace
Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #191 on: February 23, 2011, 11:30:18 pm »

I've been off the fags for a while now. Hate it, to be honest.

I don't remember much in the way of physical withdrawal symptoms - or even psychological symptoms. Just don't like being a non-smoker - bunch of killjoy goody-goodies. I've always been very suspicious of clean living types; I imagine them watching homo erotic Nazi fitness propaganda films in the evenings

IIRC, J. G. Ballard once wrote a short satire to that effect for the Guardian (or possibly the Observer, can't remember).  The idea was that one year, when there was a particularly long summer in the Mediterranean, the bronzed and toned masses of tourists decided not to go home.  They ended up as an anarcho-fascist society, bullying and plundering the working population of southern Europe.


your thinking is very close to mine. Part of my ambivalence comes from this natural dislike of being a "killjoy goody-goody", and a disbelief that I could be turning out to be not only a non-drinker but a non-smoker too  :-\ 

Nah!  You can take all the money you save from not smoking and spend it on even more booze and even looser women.
I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked: Allen Ginsberg
The best minds of my generation are thinking about how to make people click ads: Jeff Hammerbacher

Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #192 on: February 23, 2011, 11:56:30 pm »
It's been over 10 yrs now for me, but the last couple of years I've been flirting with the idea of starting again - not serious flirtation but thoughts that come from negative thinking borne out of some really bleak darkness that has descended over the psyche during that time. I'm no stranger to a blackness of the soul but when it bites really hard the negativity really gets ramped up and all the self-destructive thoughts comes cascading into the mind seemingly without end, and mixed in with all those are thoughts relating to smoking. It's been kind of interesting to watch it happen actually. Kind of amusing almost. Certainly not threatening.

But I'm comfortable with those thoughts. No problem. We ride with them. Just like a crave - we go with the discomfort. Just place yourself right there in the middle of it and be with it. How bad can it really be? My experience is, unpleasant as it may be, if you can do that, sit right in the middle of it, embracing without fighting, it often changes. They come and they go.
Garry Broad

Titan yer Tummy

  • The little yellow crayon! What's this all about?
Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #193 on: February 25, 2011, 08:58:48 pm »
This is a very interesting thread.

There are some tales of incredible bravery in the face of the ghastly weed. Each success is offset by a story of those who fight and lose but live to fight another day.

Nobody wants to smoke and anyone who says they do is either raving mad or a barefaced liar. Many people here and elsewhere tell of trying to give up; I have yet to hear of a case of someone trying to take the habit up without success.

Those of you who still smoke should take heart from those who have written about their triumphs. Many of you who have yet to succeed will do so and then realise what a true achievement quitting is.

I note this thread has been going a long time. I found this the other day which wasn't published when the topic was started. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/retailandconsumer/8246569/The-year-smoking-will-die-out-around-the-world-table.html

Finally, just remember for those of you who have given up you have a claim to something which no non- smoker can ever lay claim to. You took on the beast and you WON.

TyT (2352 hrs Saturday 29/9/1979 and I was as pissed as a handcart)

Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #194 on: February 25, 2011, 09:04:00 pm »
Threads that involve folks overcoming adversity will always look amazing, especially to those who have never had to do it.

A "How I beat Cancer" thread (apt though it may be) would probably blow this thread away in terms of impact.

nicknack

  • Hornblower
Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #195 on: February 25, 2011, 09:07:23 pm »
(2352 hrs Saturday 29/9/1979 and I was as pissed as a handcart)

Saturday in 1979? I would have been pissed too.
There's no vibrations, but wait.

Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #196 on: February 25, 2011, 09:10:03 pm »

Finally, just remember for those of you who have given up you have a claim to something which no non- smoker can ever lay claim to. You took on the beast and you WON.


You make it sound like you had no choice in starting to smoke.

Titan yer Tummy

  • The little yellow crayon! What's this all about?
Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #197 on: February 25, 2011, 10:28:25 pm »
Don't you think you are kind of missing the point??

Tyt

Auntie Helen

  • 6 Wheels in Germany
Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #198 on: February 25, 2011, 10:48:46 pm »
A "How I beat Cancer" thread (apt though it may be) would probably blow this thread away in terms of impact.
I'm not sure of that actually; I think some of these stories in this thread have been very admirable and impressive.
My blog on cycling in Germany and eating German cake – http://www.auntiehelen.co.uk


Clandy

Re: Stopping smoking: when?
« Reply #199 on: February 25, 2011, 11:48:36 pm »

Finally, just remember for those of you who have given up you have a claim to something which no non- smoker can ever lay claim to. You took on the beast and you WON.


You make it sound like you had no choice in starting to smoke.

This is true. The thing is I was a smoker for twenty one years, and now ten years after stopping I'm a smoker who doesn't smoke. Kicking the habit is probably one of my proudest achievements. Why? Because nicotine is more addictive than heroin, and I beat it.