Author Topic: A random thread for cycling things that don't really warrant their own thread  (Read 30412 times)

I used the Woolwich Free Ferry today, for the first time since they took delivery of their made in Polska boats.
Well impressed with the electromagnetic mooring system.
Two huge f*ck off electromagnets (about 6ft2) mounted on hydraulic arms fitted to a pontoon which rises with the tide on dolphins.
Boat comes up to the pontoon and bumps into the fenders.
Hydraulic arm extends the magnets so they come into contact with the hull.
Switch on the current, and the boat becomes locked to the pontoon.
Most excellent work. :thumbsup:

I used the Woolwich Free Ferry today, for the first time since they took delivery of their made in Polska boats.
Well impressed with the electromagnetic mooring system.

Clever stuff. I found this informative:
https://mampaey.com/magnetic-auto-mooring-at-the-woolwich-ferry/


LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
I am familiar with the Cavotec Moormaster pneumatic system but magnetic mooring is a new one for me.

http://www.cavotec.com/en/your-applications/ports-maritime/automated-mooring

The fast turnaround and reduced crew involvement of these mooring systems is worth real money for ferries but less so for most other port operations. An exception is for exposed berths where ship movements from waves slow down cranes. Some container ports use these systems to hold the ship steady, making it easier and faster for crane operators. Another exception are oil/gas terminals where you want to be able to get ships away quickly in the event of an emergency.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

bhoot

  • MemSec (ex-Mrs RRtY)
The fast turnaround and reduced crew involvement of these mooring systems is worth real money for ferries but less so for most other port operations.
I think though for the Woolwich ferry the turn around time is significantly longer than the old "just hold it against the pier with the engine running" technique. It certainly feels like it takes an age for the ferry to finally manouvre into exactly the right position and for the magnets to extend. And of course the barriers are now fully interlocked, whereas on the old boats the crew operated them and they would be pretty much open by the time the ramp has descended.
Someone will now doubt come along with actual figures which show it's actually no slower but it definitely seems that it is.

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
I meant when mooring systems are compared with using mooring lines and bollards. Nothing is faster than just keeping the ferry nudged up against the fenders but that is fairly fuel-hungry and relies on the engines doing their thing to prevent motorists ending up wet. Mooring systems keep working for a time even when the power stops. I suspect that a risk assessment of "what happens when the ferry's engine stops at the wrong time" was a big factor in the change.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

The fast turnaround and reduced crew involvement of these mooring systems is worth real money for ferries but less so for most other port operations.
I think though for the Woolwich ferry the turn around time is significantly longer than the old "just hold it against the pier with the engine running" technique. It certainly feels like it takes an age for the ferry to finally manouvre into exactly the right position and for the magnets to extend. And of course the barriers are now fully interlocked, whereas on the old boats the crew operated them and they would be pretty much open by the time the ramp has descended.
Someone will now doubt come along with actual figures which show it's actually no slower but it definitely seems that it is.
Inclined to agree with this.
It did seem to take quite a while for everything to be sufficiently tickety-boo for the ramp to drop.
And, as mentioned, everything seems to be interlocked, with significant time-lag between any actions.
Doubtless, for safety.
As well as running the service with fewer crew.
In a similar way, the now fully automated lifts at the Greenwich Foot Tunnel, have significant time-lag between, say, landing and all of the lockouts checking that it is safe to open the doors.
Progress, eh?

ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
New Guiness WR for Tandem around the world,

Now we know how Covid 19 spread so quickly  ;D

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-oxfordshire-53567668
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens