Author Topic: Cartoons and their influence  (Read 8260 times)

Kim

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Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #25 on: February 06, 2012, 08:08:57 pm »
Most have already been mentioned, but I have particularly vivid memories of a couple of episodes of Ulysees 31 (which was probably some of the first television I ever watched, at the age of 4-and-a-bit), where I actually understood the plot in all its vivid disturbingness.  It was like staring into the Total Perspective Vortex or something.  Sirens!  Sisyphus!  Eeek!


Has anyone mentioned Belle and Sebastian or The Mysterious Cities of Gold yet?  That's well into what I'd describe as 'anime' rather than 'cartoons', but were both very special.  I re-watched MCOG a few years ago thanks to the electric internet, and it totally holds up.
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Wowbagger

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Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #26 on: February 06, 2012, 08:14:16 pm »
I'd almost forgotten what was probably my favourite: "Ah! Ludwig!"

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Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #27 on: February 06, 2012, 08:17:44 pm »
Am I the only one who remembers "Mary, Mungo & Midge" then  ???      I've watched most of the previously mentioned shows but have a special affection for "The Wombles" & "Paddington", which I don't think are cartoons in the technical sense.
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BrianI

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Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #28 on: February 06, 2012, 08:26:36 pm »
Yae cannae hae cartoon nostalgio wi'oot the theme tune tae "Glen Micheal's Cartoon Cavalcade" 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=arI42_bLlHo
Sunday afternoons on STV ftw!

 ;D

Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #29 on: February 06, 2012, 10:18:26 pm »
Am I the only one who remembers "Mary, Mungo & Midge" then  ???      I've watched most of the previously mentioned shows but have a special affection for "The Wombles" & "Paddington", which I don't think are cartoons in the technical sense.

No, I remember MMandM. Looking back, I realise I was fairly intrigued by the concept of a tower block, because I don't think ever I'd seen one for real at that age.

How could I forget the Pink Panther!  I can still sing the theme song, the one with the boy arriving in the car, and the Panther and Clouseau getting out...  When nephew Oli was a baby, my sister left me to watch him while she did some cooking, and I sang that to him as a lullaby.

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border-rider

Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #30 on: February 06, 2012, 11:47:41 pm »
Mr Ben

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ludwig

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Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #31 on: February 07, 2012, 06:48:50 am »
"Ah Ludwig" is where I got my name. Crystal tips and Alistair was suitably weird . Noggin the Nog was as dark as Scandinavia in winter but also melancholy in that lovely way that smallfilms made their signature. I remember seeing an Ivor the engine where a bluebottle landed on the set and they just left it in . I heard Oliver postgate mention it once in interview. Mary mungo and midge was about as basic as animation gets I guess but was a staple for lunchtimes (when I used to run home for lunch).
Tom and Jerry was laugh out loud funny and violent as hell. A double bill was bliss. It's a travesty that they were ruined by cheaper production methods and poor writing in later versions. Pink panther was clever and the little detective was good. I so wanted to drive that car that was on the opening credits.

What do young kids watch now?

CrinklyLion

  • The one with devious, cake-pushing ways....
Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #32 on: February 07, 2012, 07:48:15 am »
Well, a particular favourite of my two is 'almost naked animals'.

Srsly.

Utterly bonkers.

ETA
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Almost_Naked_Animals
Quote
The cartoon is set inside a tropical resort called the Banana Cabana.[3] All of the cabana's staff members and residents are funny animals who have shaved off their fur and wear only underwear. A dog named Howie is the manager and leader of the cabana. Each episode follows Howie and his "misfit" crew having strange adventures in the Banana Cabana.

Eccentrica Gallumbits

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Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #33 on: February 07, 2012, 07:53:41 am »
I loved Mr Ben. I think my favourite was the one with the submarines hunting a monster, so he disguised each submarine as a monster so they saw each other, thought they'd seen the monster and went away and left the monster in peace.

I also liked Bod although it was very peculiar.
My feminist marxist dialectic brings all the boys to the yard.


AndyK

Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #34 on: February 07, 2012, 07:58:07 am »


What do young kids watch now?

My nephew is addicted to Spongebob Squarepants. I can't see the appeal, but then I'm oooolllldddd.

Tim Hall

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Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #35 on: February 07, 2012, 08:21:43 am »
Bod lives on here:  When something doesn't match (pair of socks, set of tools, couple of widgets)  I've been known to say "That's not snap".

I remember an episode of Blue Peter where they showed us how a new cartoon series was made. Paper cutouts were moved bit by bit, pressed under a sheet of glass, and photographed. That was Crystal Tips and Alistair.


What about Joe?  He lived in a transport cafe which his parents ran. When it all went horribly wrong they said "Oh Joe!" inna catchphrase stylee.

Moving forward to more recent times - Duckman. Seriously odd cartoon about a private eye duck and his sidekick Cornfed.
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Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #36 on: February 07, 2012, 08:34:42 am »
Despitte my fondness for the classics of my childhood, I think the wittiest cartoon was Dangermouse.  The humour worked on two levels, just as The Simpsons does now.

mattc

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Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #37 on: February 07, 2012, 10:00:05 am »
Moving forward to more recent times - Duckman. Seriously odd cartoon about a private eye duck and his sidekick Cornfed.
Of course, Duckman! :facepalm:  (i was trying to remember that during the Ren and Stimpy posts)

Great for us fans of detective noir :D Got shown even less (and at more ridicalous times) in the UK than R&S did.

I remember a genius chaotic fight scene enacted entirely in the dark (i.e. a black screen). Just actors voices and silly sound effects for about a minute. I guess you had to be there ...
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Wowbagger

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Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #38 on: February 07, 2012, 10:04:51 am »
Despitte my fondness for the classics of my childhood, I think the wittiest cartoon was Dangermouse.  The humour worked on two levels, just as The Simpsons does now.

That was always my younger son's favourite.

Not exactly a cartoon, but The Magic Roundabout, by the same token, was always a good hors d'oeuvres for the 6 o'clock news.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Biggsy

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Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #39 on: February 07, 2012, 10:26:05 am »
Which cartoons did you watch as a child? And how strongly do you remember them?

(We didn't have a TV at home until I was 10, so my memories of the few cartoons I watched are still vivid.  I've never been a big fan of animation in general).

Tom and Gerry - influenced me to bash my brother.  Road Runner - influenced me to ride my bike too fast.

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Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #40 on: February 07, 2012, 10:49:39 am »
T&J; there's a horribly noticeable reduction in quality. The Fred Quimby films were so much better than the later ones.

Despite the fact that I enjoyed them, and would happily watch as much as I could find, I'd forgotten about Roobarb and Custard, Crystal Tipps and Alistair /i] andThe Pink Panther.

My sister, who is four years younger, watched and enjoyed a completely different set of films; Huckleberry Hound, Yogi Bear andPixie and Dixie. I didn't like them.

I've always been ambivalent about Hanna and Barbera, some of their output was, to me crap.

Nobody has mentioned the Andersons' puppet films. I put most of the in the same category of junk as Doctor Who (having lit the touch paper I'll stand well back). However, I really liked Fireball XL5.




AndyK

Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #41 on: February 07, 2012, 10:56:42 am »
Others I recall are Jamie And His Magic Torch, Hector's House, The Arabian Knights (as part of the Banana Splits Show on a Saturday morning).

clarion

  • Tyke
Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #42 on: February 07, 2012, 11:00:40 am »
My earliest love on television was the sublime Pogle's Wood.  In fact, I loved all the Firmin/Postgate oeuvre, with the exception of Bagpuss (on the basis that Professor Yaffle got a raw deal, even though he was often right (much like the Postgate family friend Bertrand Russell, on whom he was (affectionately) modelled)).

Other cartoons I never wanted to miss were Mr Benn, Captain Pugwash and Roobarb and Custard. 

Animations included Magic Roundabout and the Wombles, though Paddington never appealed (despite the fact that I adore Michael Hordern's voice - his Lear is the definitive one for me, and his Jeeves was the standard to aspire to).

American cartoons were odd ones.  I saw Tom & Jerry regularly, and loved them.  Later, I'd watch Top Cat (without realising the Sgt Bilko parallel) and the Pink Panther.  There were other US cartoons, which I was aware of, but rarely saw.  including Disney, oddly enough.  Disney only appeared as feature films at the cinema and snippets on the compilation shows at holidays.  We were familiar enough with Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck, Goofy et al, but I can't remember a single cartoon, barring the endlessly referred Steamboat Willie.

Then there was Scooby Doo.  I don't know why, but I did like it, and watched it every week, even if it was a repeat.  Even when they included guest stars who meant very little to us, like Mama Cass, or the Three Stooges.  Of course, as someone mentioned above, Crappy Doo ended the programme completely.

As I grew up, Dangermouse came along, which was an outstanding piece of work.  But I don't really remember any other cartoons from that period which appealed to me.

Then there was a break from TV for me until I had kids.  So a great many things passed me by, though Thomas the bleedin Tank Engine and Superted both drove me to complete boredom from video.

There are cartoons I will never get, like Ren & Stimpy, Angry Beavers, Beavis & Butthead, Family Guy and South Park.  But others I have encountered through my kids which really appeal, like The Simpsons and Animaniacs, which are intelligent and witty rather than just crass and banal.
Getting there...

clarion

  • Tyke
Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #43 on: February 07, 2012, 11:30:45 am »
I did mean to comment on the Supermarionation, which was an influence.  I don't recall the early shows, but I do recall Stingray, Captain Scarlet, Thunderbirds and Joe 90.

I didn't like the last of these, but the others were firm favourites.  It's a catchphrase round here, 'Stand by for action!  Anything could happen in the next half hour', though I don't have the bongos to complete the effect.
Getting there...

Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #44 on: February 07, 2012, 11:44:52 am »
Nobody has mentioned the Andersons' puppet films.

Maybe because they are not cartoons. Thunderbirds had a big influence on me as I have done much in life to help others, just as the Tracy family did.

In my defence, the thread had already drifted into stop-motion animation. Where do we draw the line?

Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #45 on: February 07, 2012, 11:49:01 am »
Nobody has mentioned the Andersons' puppet films.

Maybe because they are not cartoons. Thunderbirds had a big influence on me as I have done much in life to help others, just as the Tracy family did.

In my defence, the thread had already drifted into stop-motion animation. Where do we draw the line?

If there are no lines drawn it's not a cartoon.

AndyK

Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #46 on: February 07, 2012, 12:01:45 pm »
Nobody has mentioned the Andersons' puppet films.

Maybe because they are not cartoons. Thunderbirds had a big influence on me as I have done much in life to help others, just as the Tracy family did.

In my defence, the thread had already drifted into stop-motion animation. Where do we draw the line?

Thunderbirds etc. aren't stop motion.

Biggsy

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Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #47 on: February 07, 2012, 01:11:33 pm »
Cartoons I like now: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=simon%27s+cat - nearly but not influencing me to replace my late cats.
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Cudzoziemiec

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Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #48 on: February 07, 2012, 10:25:28 pm »
Thanks to people above for reminding me of the wonderful Mr Ben and Ivor the Engine. Quite different but both lovely. Oh, and for the correct spelling of Roobarb and Custard! I've got the sig tune going through my mind now. Did-dee-dee-dee, did-dee-dee-dee, boing-oing-oing-oing, boing-oing-oing-oing.
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Re: Cartoons and their influence
« Reply #49 on: February 07, 2012, 10:43:18 pm »
Bod lives on here:  When something doesn't match (pair of socks, set of tools, couple of widgets)  I've been known to say "That's not snap".


Bod also sometimes harboured a tiny piece of anarchy that I liked. Remember the Alberto the Frog and his Animal Band segment? Every week, Alberto solved a problem and was offered a reward - and he invariably said "Weeeeeeeeellllllllllllllllll, I wouldn't say no to a milkshake". What flavour? At this point various of the animals tried to guess the flavour - the mice said "He's going to say Chocolate", the Hippos said "He's going to ask for strawberry" etc.  Usually, one or other of the animals was right. But sometimes, just sometimes, he surprised us all and asked for a flavour that hadn't been guessed. I liked those times best. It's about as anarchic as I got as a child!
If I had a baby elephant, it could help me wash the car. If I had a car.

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