Author Topic: Cross Training: Running  (Read 203553 times)

annie

Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #100 on: March 18, 2009, 09:56:57 pm »
5 miles this morning.  Fresh and bright.  I think I went a little too fast though as I was on my own and not always very good at pacing myself. 

Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #101 on: March 18, 2009, 10:44:07 pm »
<please excuse if this sounds abrubt and rude, I'm trying to be helpful  :-[>

There's a couple of potential dangers for Chris I think ;-

You just get better at plodding, so you can run at 5mph for 30 mins, but don't get above that, and you are not utilising all your running muscles (hammies, glutes, calves, quads) and just relying on eg your hammies to pull you along so you get overdeveloped in that area.

So a suggestion - try varying it a bit more, walk a bit, do some jumping jacks, run a bit, hop on each leg, couple of squat jumps, bit of skipping, bit more walking, bit more jogging.

Then when the running bits get longer do some bounding up hills - just extending steps up a gentle hill to get the glutes firing.

Down side is that you'll feel a bit of a prat  ;D, but I think your running will pick up quickly.



"What a long, strange trip it's been", Truckin'

annie

Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #102 on: March 18, 2009, 10:54:03 pm »
<please excuse if this sounds abrubt and rude, I'm trying to be helpful  :-[>

There's a couple of potential dangers for Chris I think ;-

You just get better at plodding, so you can run at 5mph for 30 mins, but don't get above that, and you are not utilising all your running muscles (hammies, glutes, calves, quads) and just relying on eg your hammies to pull you along so you get overdeveloped in that area.

So a suggestion - try varying it a bit more, walk a bit, do some jumping jacks, run a bit, hop on each leg, couple of squat jumps, bit of skipping, bit more walking, bit more jogging.

Then when the running bits get longer do some bounding up hills - just extending steps up a gentle hill to get the glutes firing.

Down side is that you'll feel a bit of a prat  ;D, but I think your running will pick up quickly.





Apologies but I think this is likely to cause Chris huge problems.

Chris needs to build up a good base before he attempts intervals, sprints etc.  Hopping on one leg only works if your knees are 100% and are probably better off being done in the gym or at least on even and soft ground.

Running up hill with a long stride is also something that should be left for quite some time.  The most effective way to get up a hill whilst reducing the risk of injury is to use very short strides.

I can see where you are coming from but Chris just needs to learn to run first.  There is plenty of time to add in intervals/sprints/fartleks if he so wishes.


Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #103 on: March 18, 2009, 11:03:54 pm »
when you say "Chris needs to learn to run first", that's my point - he's not learning to run, he's learning to plod, what you call building a base will likely give him some bad habits that he will find difficult to break later.

And I'm not suggesting intervals, I'm suggesting a couple of hops, a couple of jumps, three or four bounds, to get all his muscle groups firing (and to have a bit more fun  ;D)


"What a long, strange trip it's been", Truckin'

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #104 on: March 18, 2009, 11:21:55 pm »
Chris probably should make sure his glutes are strong too - this is one of the things I've been told to work on by my physio.

Quote
Weak glutes also cause the hamstring and quadriceps muscles to overcompensate, which can lead to strains, says Jim Thornton, MS, ATC, PES, head athletic trainer at Clarion University in Clarion, Pa. And without a strong, working medius to align the femur, knee and ankle, you’re also more likely to overpronate your feet, which can cause plantar fasciitis (heel pain), Achilles’ tendinitis and shin splints. Inhibited gluteal muscles also lead to tight iliotibial bands, also known as ITB syndrome, and patello-femoral pain, or runner’s knee.

I haz the highlighted problems.  I'm working on the glutes every day as part of my knee rehab.  Glutes seem to be quite important.

Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #105 on: March 18, 2009, 11:22:29 pm »
Long summer evenings and crisp summer mornings are better.   :thumbsup:

(I wonder if this is why Kenya produces more world-class runners than Newfoundland?)

It could be that.
Or maybe that Kenya is at high altitude, so that Kenyans can have permanent altitude training.

Where do you runners keep your front door keys when you run? Do running vests or shorts have a pocket for them?
Or do you always have someone waiting for you at home, to let you back in again?

annie

Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #106 on: March 19, 2009, 06:31:37 am »
It would be nice to train the dogs to pass me the keys through the letter box, as this is never going to happen I have to settle for hiding them in a secret Pixie Place.

I do have a pocket in the back of my tri-suit but don't like the feeling of a key against my back or bottom.

Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #107 on: March 19, 2009, 08:52:05 am »
Long summer evenings and crisp summer mornings are better.   :thumbsup:

(I wonder if this is why Kenya produces more world-class runners than Newfoundland?)

It could be that.
Or maybe that Kenya is at high altitude, so that Kenyans can have permanent altitude training.

Indeed. Some of the best runners in history have been Finnish BTW.

PS I keep my keys at the back of my jacket in winter or in my shorts pocket in the summer.
Frenchie - Train à Grande Vitesse

Blah

  • Not sure where I'm going
Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #108 on: March 19, 2009, 09:43:17 am »
Where do you runners keep your front door keys when you run? Do running vests or shorts have a pocket for them?

Running specific shorts usually have a little pocket that sits just under the elastic band at the front (usually at 2o'clock if that makes sense), with space for one key.

I either do that, or just carry them in my hand when I'm running.

Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #109 on: March 19, 2009, 09:57:47 am »
If you want some fun then go down to one of the car parks at Richmond Park (or anywhere else people drive down to to go running) and watch the runners about to set off (or come back) from their run. Lots of them leave their car keys on top of one of the front wheels, or in one of those magnetic boxes that stick to the inside of the wheel arch. It's so obvious what they're doing when they're fiddling around by the wheel.

Just sitting on a bench opposite the car park watching them do this makes them very nervous. :)
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #110 on: March 19, 2009, 11:12:06 am »
I am surprised nobody has played tricks on these drivers!
Frenchie - Train à Grande Vitesse

Blah

  • Not sure where I'm going
Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #111 on: March 19, 2009, 01:15:58 pm »
If you want some fun then go down to one of the car parks at Richmond Park (or anywhere else people drive down to to go running) and watch the runners about to set off (or come back) from their run. Lots of them leave their car keys on top of one of the front wheels, or in one of those magnetic boxes that stick to the inside of the wheel arch. It's so obvious what they're doing when they're fiddling around by the wheel.

It's the same on any surfing/windsurfing/kitesurfing beach

border-rider

Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #112 on: March 19, 2009, 01:34:25 pm »

Where do you runners keep your front door keys when you run? Do running vests or shorts have a pocket for them?


In m hand, usually

Or if I'm going via the paper shop (as I often do) I'll wear a small rucksack with a key pocket

Manotea

  • Where there is doubt...
Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #113 on: March 19, 2009, 02:03:42 pm »
The thought of dropping a key or having it bounce out of a pocket brings me out in hives. I thread the key twice onto a shoe lace before tieing them. Absolutely secure.

Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #114 on: April 05, 2009, 10:35:22 pm »
Went to Sherwood forest last week and did the MTB XC course which is great, great fun for a run too (through the forest, on narrow trails); as it was during the week I didn't see more than two riders (and they were of the slow type too). Run it with a fit friend as well to make the experience even more fun!  :thumbsup:

If only I could loose more weight though, to run these faster! <sigh>
Frenchie - Train à Grande Vitesse

Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #115 on: April 15, 2009, 12:00:10 pm »
Just got some lovely Salomon running kit (they do some lovely stuff) to treat myself and keep me going!  :P

A trip to the Peak Districk is planned this WE I think!
Frenchie - Train à Grande Vitesse

Julian

  • samoture
Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #116 on: April 19, 2009, 10:52:46 pm »
I found out how to do intervals yesterday!  :thumbsup:

The novelty value may wear off quite soon though, cos it hurts. 

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #117 on: April 19, 2009, 10:59:46 pm »
I found out how to do intervals yesterday!  :thumbsup:

The novelty value may wear off quite soon though, cos it hurts. 

It will make the actual event hurt less though.  Interval training lets you achieve more in less time.  :thumbsup:

Jacomus

  • My favourite gender neutral pronoun is comrade
Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #118 on: April 22, 2009, 11:29:51 pm »
I've discovered that it isn't running that makes my knees weak - its cycling. During my 3 month lay-off the bike I started running.

No knee pain what so ever... get back on the bike and I can't run again :(
"The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity." Amelia Earhart

Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #119 on: April 23, 2009, 10:18:04 pm »
I found out how to do intervals yesterday!  :thumbsup:

The novelty value may wear off quite soon though, cos it hurts. 

It will make the actual event hurt less though. 

More accurately you will  likely hurt more during the event, but it will last less long. Depending how you calculate these things that may equate to less overall hurt  ;D
"What a long, strange trip it's been", Truckin'

Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #120 on: April 24, 2009, 11:42:30 am »
I found out how to do intervals yesterday!  :thumbsup:

The novelty value may wear off quite soon though, cos it hurts. 

It will make the actual event hurt less though. 

More accurately you will  likely hurt more during the event, but it will last less long. Depending how you calculate these things that may equate to less overall hurt  ;D

It will make you able to displace the pain barrier is the exact point I would say; i.e. run hard at a faster pace and for longer.
Frenchie - Train à Grande Vitesse

Blah

  • Not sure where I'm going
Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #121 on: April 24, 2009, 02:41:06 pm »
Intervals make you learn to love pain. It lets you know where the hurtbox is and how to stay in it for longer.

Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #122 on: May 27, 2009, 11:32:05 am »
Entered my first road race in a while for later in June... I will have little hard training as my hipe has lefted me grounded for a while but I'm getting back into it and it is only 5 miles...
Frenchie - Train à Grande Vitesse

Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #123 on: June 03, 2009, 11:03:24 am »
Did two woodland trail runs in the woods near Ruford over the week end. The bit if woodlands I run in is located on an incline and, although the area is small, it offered enough trails (grass, dirt, woodedd) and short climbs to entertain myself for up to 50 min. runs. With the heat it was a perfect way to end the days this WE. I wish I had such settings near where I live!
Frenchie - Train à Grande Vitesse

Re: Cross Training: Running
« Reply #124 on: June 11, 2009, 08:34:04 am »
Entered my first road race in a while for later in June... I will have little hard training as my hipe has lefted me grounded for a while but I'm getting back into it and it is only 5 miles...

Well, well, nothing spectacular but a healthy 35 min. (exact race time to be confirmed). The first 3 miles were a doddle; the 4th was pretty bad, mainly because I got my split time wrong and as I was starting to struggle a bit I was also worried I was slowing down way too much. It is quite a bit slower than I would have done the last time I raced over 8 yeras ago, but seeing as I am also 2 stones heavier and have become an occasional jogger rather than a regular runner I'm pleased! Cycling endurance does transfer into some running fitness in my case.
Frenchie - Train à Grande Vitesse