Author Topic: Bread machine baking  (Read 6592 times)

hellymedic

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Re: Bread machine baking
« Reply #25 on: October 28, 2017, 10:45:05 pm »
Given how stiff I think Woolly's dough would be, I reckon an industrial-strength mixer is needed. I know NOTHING about mixers but methinks a weak little 'domestic' motor would BLOW!

Re: Bread machine baking
« Reply #26 on: October 28, 2017, 11:04:13 pm »
Something like a 1200W or 1400W Kenwood Chef, or similar, ought to have enough grunt, but you're looking at £300-£400+ brand new.
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Re: Bread machine baking
« Reply #27 on: October 29, 2017, 08:11:52 am »
We've got one of these.

Not the cheapest but it produces consistent results and a loaf shaped loaf.

Max loaf size is 600g of flour with 380g of water.

I had a series of those, they all got replaced under guarantee at 11 months as the motor failed - it was used at least once a day but only rarely for rye dough. So probably not tough enough for Wooly's purpose. The motors on the Panasonics have been much more hard-wearing and some models have a rye-dough specific paddle. You can make a larger amount of dough if you're only using it for the knead & first prove stage, but probably not as much as 2 kg.
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Re: Bread machine baking
« Reply #28 on: October 29, 2017, 09:14:02 am »
Something like a 1200W or 1400W Kenwood Chef, or similar, ought to have enough grunt, but you're looking at £300-£400+ brand new.

+1 for the Kenwood, but make sure it is on very secure footing before making heavy dough.  Our first try was maybe a bit too thick, for it detached from the bowl and clumped asymmetrically on the dough hook. The mixer walked off the worktop and the repair cost 147€.

Great mixer, though.
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Re: Bread machine baking
« Reply #29 on: October 29, 2017, 10:39:41 am »
For a 100% rye recipe I'm not sure I'd trust any domestic machine. I know that one of the best kitchen workouts around is kneading the stuff.
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Re: Bread machine baking
« Reply #30 on: October 29, 2017, 10:59:05 pm »
Something like a 1200W or 1400W Kenwood Chef, or similar, ought to have enough grunt, but you're looking at £300-£400+ brand new.

+2 I brought a 2nd hand one off ebay a few years ago(would guess at it being late 70's early 80's), on the recommendation of a friend who had a new machine as well as the one she got as a wedding present in early 80's she said when I was thinking of getting one look as 2nd hand as her old one was much better. I had a slight issue with one I picked up off ebay for circa £50 as the speed controller wasn't working properly (googling suggest common issue with older machines) I got it fixed for not a lot at wilkinsons in Skipton. My understanding is the older ones are better made & have parts that are fixable & you can get more gadgets if you so desire

woollypigs

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Re: Bread machine baking
« Reply #31 on: October 30, 2017, 06:04:48 am »
Had a look at it, it is a Kenwood Chef, though can't see the W's. It was making a very high pitched squeeky sound from the day we got it, Not just I'm loud sound more like I'm broken sound.

I'll have a look out for a secondhand one with  some oomph.
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Re: Bread machine baking
« Reply #32 on: November 04, 2017, 07:58:27 pm »
Try getting it repaired at http://www.kenwoodchefrestore.co.uk

As you can see here I got my mum's old one refurbed with a more robust motor.
https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=93931.0
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slope

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Re: Bread machine baking
« Reply #33 on: December 25, 2020, 02:26:14 pm »
Thread resurrection!

Considering upping my laziness and efficiency - buying a bread machine that is.

My default bread is heavily seeded and wondered if this is likely to present any problems?

Current loaves are 50/50 strong white/strong wholemeal = 650g + 200g total of 50/50 pumpkin/sunflower seeds.

I see some Panasonics have little hoppers for seeds etc, but can't ascertain their capacity.

Any advice would be gratefully appreciated.

Wowbagger

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Re: Bread machine baking
« Reply #34 on: December 25, 2020, 02:50:06 pm »
Our first bread maker had a seed dispenser, but I rarely used it. A pal had an identical one, and he did, and he reckoned that the non-stick surface of the bucket had been abraded away in short order. That was many years ago and they may well be a lot better.

I have just made an 80% rye loaf (the other 20% was strong white) and it's really good. Pretty puddingy, but then that's what you want with rye bread. I also added some sugar and used three times as much yeast as I would have done for a white/wholemeal mix.
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Re: Bread machine baking
« Reply #35 on: December 25, 2020, 05:18:59 pm »
I have a Panasonic SD255.  It has a fruit/nut/seed dispenser that the instruction manual reckons holds a maximum of 150g of dried fruit/nuts.

I don't have 200g of seeds to measure it for you but the hopper's dimensions are approximately 36*75*100mm

slope

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Re: Bread machine baking
« Reply #36 on: December 25, 2020, 05:58:15 pm »
Thanks JonBuoy :thumbsup: