Author Topic: Amusing translation errors  (Read 12721 times)

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #76 on: 27 November, 2020, 05:41:12 pm »
Here are lots of Germans saying squirrel and at the end Klaus saying Eichhörnchen

https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F161094258&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&visual=true&show_comments=true&color=false&show_user=true&show_reposts=false#
So what does
Quote
Scheißbuchfertigstellungbedürfnis
mean? Something along the lines of ''the need to finish a shit book''?
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Mrs Pingu

  • Who ate all the pies? Me
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Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #77 on: 27 November, 2020, 05:42:17 pm »
Ok I think I can say it if I do it really fast repeatedly ;D
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

fboab

  • It's a fecking serious business, riding a bike
Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #78 on: 23 December, 2020, 01:44:51 pm »
Quote from: Randonneurs Tokyo
注意 Cautions
Heavy traffic are expected at major route (national route). Please watch very carefully at city area where cars tends to go into shops and restaurants along the road. Please make much time for your riding plan. Please have enough sheep time, it will be very dangerous to ride without proper sheep.

https://randonneurs.tokyo/?p=11173

TSS is not Total Sex Score, Chris!

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #79 on: 23 December, 2020, 01:53:05 pm »
I have a merino baselayer, will that do?
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #80 on: 08 January, 2021, 01:13:50 pm »
Transliterating placenames can be tricky. There are rules or conventions but most well known places are exceptions, and then the conventions themselves are subject to change, eg Peking > Beijing. I've been reading a story set in nineteenth century Poland but translated from Yiddish. It mentions many small towns which, obviously, are given the Yiddish versions of their names. It's a bit odd seeing eg Lentshno instead of Łęczna, but of course most readers won't be familiar with these names at all, so that doesn't matter. In addition, the Yiddish names are more accessible for the English reader: Shebreshin looks quite readable, whereas Szczebrzeszyn might make you  ??? and  :o . But world events can change even the most anonymous small town in the middle of nowhere or Central Europe. When the translation was made, no one had heard of Tchiernobil...
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #81 on: 09 January, 2021, 01:58:56 am »
I usually have little trouble dealing with transliterated entities.

I'm often puzzled by names ending with ...cki.

Is that pronounced ski or key?

Seems like the named one chooses...

Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #82 on: 09 January, 2021, 07:59:31 am »
Its pronounced -tski.

The place I always find strange for transliterated placenames is the Czech Republic. Because historically both Czech and German were spoken there, all the towns have names in both languages. Unfortunately Czech contains sounds which don't exist in German, and vice versa, so the transliteration gets somewhat mangled. The town of Winterberg, for example, is awkward in Czech and comes out as Vimperk. Or in the other direction, Kroměříž is unpronounceable in German (or pretty much any language other than Czech) and ends up as Kremsier.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #83 on: 02 March, 2021, 12:50:05 am »
Just spotted a Chinglish translation of 'Live' and 'Neutral' (in the electrical sense) as 'Zero line' and 'Firewire'.  Put those on your tragic hipster toilet doors.   :thumbsup:
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Steph

  • Fast. Fast and bulbous. But fluffy.
Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #84 on: 02 March, 2021, 03:48:53 am »
Now, I admit I have advantages in that I am someone who picks up languages easily, as well as pronunciations, and I do lack the attitude seen in too many people I know*, but I found the immediate refusal to even attempt to pronounce this easy one depressing. All it is is a tongue click and a guttural voiced 'g'...

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-56182349


*I was attempting to explain how to pronounce Liechtenstein to a colleague, who is a tit. Attempting to explain the blindingly simple rule in German that 'ei' and 'ie' are pronounced (in essence) by simply saying the English name of the second letter, I was met with "You've got a degree in this shit. How are ordinary people supposed to remember?"

Actually listening to what I say would probably be a good starting point.
Mae angen arnaf i byw, a fe fydda'i

Beardy

  • What’s this do?
  • I’ve always wondered where this was
Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #85 on: 02 March, 2021, 08:12:05 am »
Now, I admit I have advantages in that I am someone who picks up languages easily, as well as pronunciations, and I do lack the attitude seen in too many people I know*, but I found the immediate refusal to even attempt to pronounce this easy one depressing. All it is is a tongue click and a guttural voiced 'g'...

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-56182349


*I was attempting to explain how to pronounce Liechtenstein to a colleague, who is a tit. Attempting to explain the blindingly simple rule in German that 'ei' and 'ie' are pronounced (in essence) by simply saying the English name of the second letter, I was met with "You've got a degree in this shit. How are ordinary people supposed to remember?"

Actually listening to what I say would probably be a good starting point.
Being deaf and dyslexic means that language has always been a challenge for me, even English and I’ve been trying to use that with varying levels of success for nearly 60 years. Being somewhat aspergic also adds my almost teenage tragicomic inability to read even the most basic of human emotion/body language to the mix so I in effect walk around in my own personal fog of confusion. Fortunately Sarah is mostly tolerant of my apparent stupidity and can get cross with people who start to treat me like an idiot because I’ve reacted in an unusual way to some attempt at their communication with me.
Sorting my life out, one shed at a time.

T42

  • *** fool in a hurry
Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #86 on: 02 March, 2021, 08:50:50 am »
Just spotted a Chinglish translation of 'Live' and 'Neutral' (in the electrical sense) as 'Zero line' and 'Firewire'.  Put those on your tragic hipster toilet doors.   :thumbsup:

The toilets in a restaurant we ate in once had a rooster on the door of the gents.  After my son had been, I asked him where it was.

Son: Round there at the back. You can tell it's the gents, it has a cock on the door.
MrsT: What's on the ladies?
Son: Dunno... a knocker?
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #87 on: 02 March, 2021, 10:46:44 am »
Now, I admit I have advantages in that I am someone who picks up languages easily, as well as pronunciations, and I do lack the attitude seen in too many people I know*, but I found the immediate refusal to even attempt to pronounce this easy one depressing. All it is is a tongue click and a guttural voiced 'g'...

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-56182349


*I was attempting to explain how to pronounce Liechtenstein to a colleague, who is a tit. Attempting to explain the blindingly simple rule in German that 'ei' and 'ie' are pronounced (in essence) by simply saying the English name of the second letter, I was met with "You've got a degree in this shit. How are ordinary people supposed to remember?"

Actually listening to what I say would probably be a good starting point.
By a spooky coincidence, in 2019 I spent a short time working with a trans woman called Steph who had recently moved from PE, as she called it ("So whereabouts in South Africa did you live?" "PE" "Umm... Pietermaritzburg?")
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #88 on: 11 March, 2021, 07:24:00 pm »

Not an error or a translation, just a FOREIGN LANGUAGE pun. Bać means fear, so the placard says "I fear fascism". Except it says more than that, because they've used the infinitive rather than the first person of the verb (go straight to Grammar thread, do not pass go, do not collect 200 złoty!). This makes it only one letter away from the verb jebać, so it also means "Fuck fascism".
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #89 on: 11 March, 2021, 07:38:23 pm »
When taking my degree course in the early-90s, I wrote an essay in Swedish about the First Gulf War. My point was supposed to be that we only made the effort because of the oilfields. Only I got my German & Swedish mixed up and used 'ölfält', which actually means 'beerfield', rather than 'oljefält'. Knowing me as she did, my lecturer thought it rather appropriate.
Haggerty F, Haggerty R, Tomkins, Noble, Carrick, Robson, Crapper, Dewhurst, Macintyre, Treadmore, Davitt.

Salvatore

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Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #90 on: 08 April, 2021, 10:28:52 am »
Transliterating placenames can be tricky.

You'd think that machine translation would have enough problems translating Finnish, with its 14 cases, non-gendered pronouns, vowel harmony, agglutinating and compound nouns etc etc etc, and you'd think that placenames would be comparatively easy. But no



This is from a couple of years ago, and I think it's improved now, but Jaala=Nottingham?
I also remember Moskova=London, even though Finnish has it's own name for London - Lontoon.
BTW Hki = Helsinki, Sln=Savonlinna
Quote
et avec John, excellent lecteur de road-book, on s'en est sortis sans erreur

Steph

  • Fast. Fast and bulbous. But fluffy.
Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #91 on: 08 April, 2021, 10:36:42 am »
Now, I admit I have advantages in that I am someone who picks up languages easily, as well as pronunciations, and I do lack the attitude seen in too many people I know*, but I found the immediate refusal to even attempt to pronounce this easy one depressing. All it is is a tongue click and a guttural voiced 'g'...

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-56182349


*I was attempting to explain how to pronounce Liechtenstein to a colleague, who is a tit. Attempting to explain the blindingly simple rule in German that 'ei' and 'ie' are pronounced (in essence) by simply saying the English name of the second letter, I was met with "You've got a degree in this shit. How are ordinary people supposed to remember?"

Actually listening to what I say would probably be a good starting point.
By a spooky coincidence, in 2019 I spent a short time working with a trans woman called Steph who had recently moved from PE, as she called it ("So whereabouts in South Africa did you live?" "PE" "Umm... Pietermaritzburg?")

PMBurg, or, as it became in Tom Sharpe's books, Piemburg
Mae angen arnaf i byw, a fe fydda'i