Author Topic: Amusing translation errors  (Read 10581 times)

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
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Portaloos for Brexit

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #76 on: November 27, 2020, 05:41:12 pm »
Here are lots of Germans saying squirrel and at the end Klaus saying Eichhörnchen

https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F161094258&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&visual=true&show_comments=true&color=false&show_user=true&show_reposts=false#
So what does
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Scheißbuchfertigstellungbedürfnis
mean? Something along the lines of ''the need to finish a shit book''?
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Portaloos for Brexit

Mrs Pingu

  • Who ate all the pies? Me
    • Twitter
Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #77 on: November 27, 2020, 05:42:17 pm »
Ok I think I can say it if I do it really fast repeatedly ;D
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

fboab

  • It's a fecking serious business, riding a bike
Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #78 on: December 23, 2020, 01:44:51 pm »
Quote from: Randonneurs Tokyo
注意 Cautions
Heavy traffic are expected at major route (national route). Please watch very carefully at city area where cars tends to go into shops and restaurants along the road. Please make much time for your riding plan. Please have enough sheep time, it will be very dangerous to ride without proper sheep.

https://randonneurs.tokyo/?p=11173

TSS is not Total Sex Score, Chris!

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #79 on: December 23, 2020, 01:53:05 pm »
I have a merino baselayer, will that do?
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Portaloos for Brexit

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #80 on: January 08, 2021, 01:13:50 pm »
Transliterating placenames can be tricky. There are rules or conventions but most well known places are exceptions, and then the conventions themselves are subject to change, eg Peking > Beijing. I've been reading a story set in nineteenth century Poland but translated from Yiddish. It mentions many small towns which, obviously, are given the Yiddish versions of their names. It's a bit odd seeing eg Lentshno instead of Łęczna, but of course most readers won't be familiar with these names at all, so that doesn't matter. In addition, the Yiddish names are more accessible for the English reader: Shebreshin looks quite readable, whereas Szczebrzeszyn might make you  ??? and  :o . But world events can change even the most anonymous small town in the middle of nowhere or Central Europe. When the translation was made, no one had heard of Tchiernobil...
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Portaloos for Brexit

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #81 on: January 09, 2021, 01:58:56 am »
I usually have little trouble dealing with transliterated entities.

I'm often puzzled by names ending with ...cki.

Is that pronounced ski or key?

Seems like the named one chooses...

Re: Amusing translation errors
« Reply #82 on: January 09, 2021, 07:59:31 am »
Its pronounced -tski.

The place I always find strange for transliterated placenames is the Czech Republic. Because historically both Czech and German were spoken there, all the towns have names in both languages. Unfortunately Czech contains sounds which don't exist in German, and vice versa, so the transliteration gets somewhat mangled. The town of Winterberg, for example, is awkward in Czech and comes out as Vimperk. Or in the other direction, Kroměříž is unpronounceable in German (or pretty much any language other than Czech) and ends up as Kremsier.