Author Topic: pannier bags  (Read 3564 times)

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
pannier bags
« on: July 09, 2012, 07:49:58 pm »
Previously on Ian's commute, his pannier bag was last seen bouncing down the road like a sack of angry leprechauns. This, and the current deluge, has reminded me that I need to invest in a replacement. I have an ancient set of Decathlon's finest but they've now passed the threshold where there is more duct tape to them than bag, and they're about as waterproof as a sieve. On the plus side, I can leave them on the bike without fear of anyone nicking them. On the negative side, all my stuff is going to fall out of the bottom.

I was impressed by the floating Ortlieb pannier in Mr G's picture the other day, which seems just the trick. However, being of tomcruisian proportions I ride a small bike and sometimes things don't fit on a small bike like they ought to (because they just zapped a grown-up bike with a shrink ray, the fiends!). I have this rack which has the distinction of having a fairly narrow top, but the side bits (yes, I believe this is the correct terminology) stick out. I don't want to replace the rack, standard non-adjustable ones tend not to fit unless I want a rack with a positively jaunty attitude. And I don't.

So, wise ones, will an Ortlieb (the funky QL1 fittings) fit? I see there's a QL2 which promises added positional funkiness, for more pounds, of course. I could troll around London looking for a shop that sells them, but frankly it's wet and I've animals to line up. Other suggestions, of course, appreciated.
!nataS pihsroW

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: pannier bags
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2012, 08:04:08 pm »
I doubt you'll have trouble making an Ortlieb fit the rack.  There's enough adjustability that they'll fit almost anything.  The question is going to be heel overlap, and that's a bit trickier.

AIUI the only advantage of the QL2 fittings over the QL1 is that they can be re-configured without the aid of allen keys.  Potentially useful if you've got multiple bikes with very different racks.  The other thing is that the 'Plus' flavour of Ortliebs are made of a lighter weight and more easily patched material (DAHIKT).

If you're commuting, then the roll-top closure Ortliebs may not be the best choice - ease of access to the contents may trump the ability to operate as a flotation device.

Also, be aware that the scrotes of That London at least have learned to recognise Ortlieb panniers and their super-quick-release mechanism, and may attempt to grab them while you're stopped at the traffic lights.  Some additional form of attachment may prove necessary.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: pannier bags
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2012, 07:34:12 am »
Can't answer the Ortlieb question as I have never tried them - the single compartment of the classic combined with my ability to destroy anything plastic on my commute has kept me away from them, my current fave is the Sue - oops, sorry, Carradice.

LEE

Re: pannier bags
« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2012, 07:40:48 am »
I doubt you'll have trouble making an Ortlieb fit the rack.  There's enough adjustability that they'll fit almost anything.  The question is going to be heel overlap, and that's a bit trickier.

AIUI the only advantage of the QL2 fittings over the QL1 is that they can be re-configured without the aid of allen keys.  Potentially useful if you've got multiple bikes with very different racks.  The other thing is that the 'Plus' flavour of Ortliebs are made of a lighter weight and more easily patched material (DAHIKT).

If you're commuting, then the roll-top closure Ortliebs may not be the best choice - ease of access to the contents may trump the ability to operate as a flotation device.

Also, be aware that the scrotes of That London at least have learned to recognise Ortlieb panniers and their super-quick-release mechanism, and may attempt to grab them while you're stopped at the traffic lights.  Some additional form of attachment may prove necessary.

A simple wire, passed through the "stop the quick-release mechanism from operating" hole will stop someone grabbing the panniers.  Basically same principle as Hand-grenade pin.

I never tried it but I don't think I dreamt reading about it in the instructions.

Ortleib every time.  Expensive initially but not so expensive over their lifetime.

Depending on how much you want to carry, check out their front panniers for use as rear panniers on smaller bikes.

Re: pannier bags
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2012, 09:11:16 am »
I have convinced my Ortliebs to go on to quite a wide variety of racks.  :). You may wish to check for heel strike first. I use the Ortlieb front panniers as my normal commuting ones at the moment and they go on all the racks I have, including the rather peculiar front rack on my Orbit, when I have the baby seat on the rear. They are very dry. :)
Quote from: Kim
^ This woman knows what she's talking about.

jogler

  • mojo operandi
Re: pannier bags
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2012, 09:19:15 am »


Depending on how much you want to carry, check out their front panniers for use as rear panniers on smaller bikes.

We have succesfully used this technique on my granddaughter's Isla bike.

Re: pannier bags
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2012, 09:35:41 am »
I doubt you're smaller than me, Ian - I'm 5' 10-and-a-half, and I can use full size Ortliebs on the back, on a drop sided rack. I do have 700 wheels - I suppose the pannier would sit a bit low on 26s, but it would still be ok, I think.

I tend to use my front pannier on the rear for commuting, but that's more because the big ones are so cavernous I'd fall in looking for my lunch.

On the security front, I have a stretchy net on the rack, and I fasten the Ortlieb roll top through it to prevent (or slow down) any theft attempts.


frankly frankie

  • I kid you not
    • Fuchsiaphile
Re: pannier bags
« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2012, 09:44:37 am »
One trick is to buy a spare pair of QL1 hooks (eg Wiggle stock them) and fit one to each pannier, so the panniers have 3 hooks.  Only 2 will quick-release with the handle, you'd have to manually release the 3rd hook to remove the pannier.

+1 for front panniers on the rear.
It's not dark yet but it's getting there.

Eccentrica Gallumbits

  • Rock 'n' roll and brew, rock 'n' roll and brew...
Re: pannier bags
« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2012, 10:07:25 am »
I doubt you're smaller than me, Ian - I'm 5' 10-and-a-half,
I know it's been raining a lot, but I'm surprised you've grown that much!  ;D
My feminist marxist dialectic brings all the boys to the yard.


Re: pannier bags
« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2012, 10:28:41 am »
hahaha - ok, ok, I may have accidentally grown 12 inches there.

I was going to say 'grown a foot' but that would just compound the confusion.

Poursuivant

  • a.k.a. Steve Murray
Re: pannier bags
« Reply #10 on: July 10, 2012, 10:36:10 am »
I use standard Ortlieb Back Roller Classics on the back of a 26" wheeled medium size MTB and have managed (easy peasy) to adjust their catches/clasps so that they sit right at the back of the rack with no risk of heel catching even with my humungous plates of meat (I'm 5' 9"-ish with size 11 and a half feet). I use a one of these: http://www.wiggle.co.uk/abus-combiflex-202-90cm-cable-bike-lock/ threaded between the two and intertwined with the rack itself to stop scrotal thievery at the lights.

I can't work out how to insert images ??? :facepalm:

Re: pannier bags
« Reply #11 on: July 10, 2012, 10:42:29 am »
I always use re-usable cable ties as an additional measure to secure panniers in case of failure/pannier jump.  Also provides security against quick theft as suggested here.  Very light, very easy, doubles up for other uses; whats not to like about this idea?

Re: pannier bags
« Reply #12 on: July 10, 2012, 11:15:50 am »
Well, I take my panniers on and off too often to be bothered with cable ties, I think - even reusable ones sound a bit fiddly?.

jogler

  • mojo operandi
Re: pannier bags
« Reply #13 on: July 10, 2012, 11:33:47 am »
I too have used cable ties but only when the panniers are fitted at the start of the day & removed at the campsite/hostel/B&B.

For intermittent on/off I use one of these

http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/abus-combiflex-201-retractable-16-mm-steel-cable-lock-70-cm-prod17333/

passed through the Ortlieb pannier back plate & rack.

I often take a single pannier into a shop with me & sometimes think one of these

http://www.ortlieb.co.uk/bike/bike-accessories/rucsac-adapter.html

would be usefull

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: pannier bags
« Reply #14 on: July 10, 2012, 12:05:12 pm »
Fortunately my packing style is to think of every item I may possibly need in the next 15–20 years and then put aall that in the bag (this may have something to do with why the last one broke off). Any scrote foolish enough to make a grab for the pannier bag will probably end up wrenching their arm off at the shoulder.

I'll dig out the measuring stick – other panniers fit without heel strike if the bag sits back on the rack, I was more worried about how low it would sit, with the lower, sticky-out bar on the rack. I wasn't clear on the distance between the upper and lower clasp, I could only find entire bag dimensions.
!nataS pihsroW

PaulF

  • "World's Scariest Barman"
  • It's only impossible if you stop to think about it
Re: pannier bags
« Reply #15 on: July 10, 2012, 12:10:39 pm »
On the Ortleib you can slide the hooks in a track to control how far forward/backward the pannier sits

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: pannier bags
« Reply #16 on: July 10, 2012, 02:41:43 pm »
Can't answer the Ortlieb question as I have never tried them - the single compartment of the classic

No longer the case, as of at least 2011's model.  They have an internal pocket with two compartments, one zipped.

See the photo in this post.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

PH

Re: pannier bags
« Reply #17 on: July 10, 2012, 08:07:40 pm »
Slanting the top rail on QL2 panniers does give quite a bit more heel clearance, though you might not like the jaunty angle.  I wouldn't want to guess if you need that extra, only one way to find out.
If you're looking for big panniers, you might also consider the Vaude Aqua Back, similar quality, construction and price as the Ortliebs, they taper a bit more so have more clearance where you need it.