Author Topic: A random thread for food things that don't really warrant a thread of their own  (Read 183575 times)

T42

  • Tea tank
Re: A random thread for food things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
« Reply #3225 on: September 28, 2019, 08:06:54 am »
Gawd. MrsT's ditched all her untea-bags, and tells me I should too. Bugger that, as a 72-year-old card-carrying diabetic with coronary problems I'll probably be dead in five years anyway.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Re: A random thread for food things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
« Reply #3226 on: September 30, 2019, 01:32:02 am »
Leaf tea *is* nicer - I just generally can't be arsed.

T42

  • Tea tank
Re: A random thread for food things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
« Reply #3227 on: September 30, 2019, 08:51:32 am »
Exactly.  I switched to Whittard's finger-lifting good stuff a couple of years back but cleaning out the infuser was a bore and it was giving me gastritis anyway. Twining's bags may be rubbish but it's quick and it doesn't wear hobnail boots. Whittard's orders dept was staffed by dead slugs, too: run out of tea in March and your next cup'd be in May.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: A random thread for food things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
« Reply #3228 on: September 30, 2019, 12:49:15 pm »
Ditching your tea bags because of microplastics seems an unwarranted overreaction, whether it's for health of body or oceans.
A cup of tea is the perfect bridge between real life and cake.

I've never seen the material mentioned on a packet and I've only ever noticed one that was obviously plastic (I can't remember the brand but it was something fairly fancy: Tea Pigs perhaps?) so I'm assuming many contain plastic, probably in a mixture with paper, without it being obvious. Until recently, when someone told me they shouldn't go on compost for this reason, I'd assumed they were all paper.

Tea pigs are made from corn starch and paper. Always have been.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Our house has been permeated by the pleasant aroma of parkin.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

<checks date>

Nope, it's not April Fool's Day, so what (and I cannot emphasise this enough) the hell were The Glenlivet thinking?

https://foodanddrink.scotsman.com/drink/the-glenlivet-unveil-innovative-capsule-collection-of-glassless-cocktails/

I'll leave the tweet here so you can have a giggle at some of the replies:

https://twitter.com/TheGlenlivet/status/1179447297807147009
"Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And when you look long into an abyss, the abyss also looks into you." ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

Kim

  • Timelord
Nope, it's not April Fool's Day, so what (and I cannot emphasise this enough) the hell were The Glenlivet thinking?

That they might be able to increase sales by targeting the Tide-pod-eating demographic and/or causing some outcry on social media?

Anyway, this seems like a worthy subject for a Ralphy/Manx Beard Club collaboration.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

fuaran

  • rothair gasta
There are similar things for capsules of water, in a kind of seaweed stuff. I've tried them in a race.
Probably makes sense as an alternative to single-use plastic bottles or cups. Not sure how the environmental impact compares to glass bottles?

They had a weird texture, need to chew on them a bit, or just spit out the 'skin'.
Also means you get all of the liquid in your mouth at once. Isn't the point of a quality whisky to sip on it slowly, and smell the flavours? Though looks like the Glenlivet ones are some sort of cocktail, not just whisky.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Meanwhile, a medical  Twitterfriend is wondering who/why WHAT anybody should apply these at 'the other end'...

Though looks like the Glenlivet ones are some sort of cocktail, not just whisky.

Yes, they are cocktails, so as suggested by Kim and in the Twitter replies, they are not aimed at those who prefer to drink their whisky properly.

Meanwhile, a medical  Twitterfriend is wondering who/why WHAT anybody should apply these at 'the other end'...

The tabloid outrage over people getting wrecked by using them as suppositories is a matter of when, not if.  :demon:
"Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And when you look long into an abyss, the abyss also looks into you." ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

barakta

  • Bastard lovechild of Yomiko Readman and Johnny 5
I shared this with a whisky loving friend for the lolz, his rant was suitably scathing... Apparently the contents are pretty crap too.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
I am not surprised! I am not particularly fond of whisky and my medical Twitterfriend isn't a whisky buff AFAIK but wanted to sip and savour, which isn't really possible with a capsule.

I'd HATE to be confronted with a fixed-dose mouthful of ANYTHING!

T42

  • Tea tank
Those considering the rectal approach should first look up "enema" in the dictionary.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Those considering the rectal approach should first look up "enema" in the dictionary.

Gwyneth Paltrow joke goes here ==>
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Apropos of looking at a knife/set of knives as a gift I wandered into Nisbets. While I was there I discover that my knives appear to be quite costly these days. eg let's look at a paring knife for £50. I noticed that the Rockwell of those is quoted as 56, and, while I wouldn't actually swear to it being as how long ago I bought them , I'm sure that the rating for mine when I bought them was 59. Anyhow, I carried on poking around and discover that they do make a 61 Rockwell, in carbon steel.  How much for that paring knife ???

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
<Punctuation grumble>
(click to show/hide)

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
<Punctuation grumble>
(click to show/hide)

Doubly so when they got it right elsewhere on the same page.  To the Reëducation Camps, Nisbets.  Knive's and fork's will be provided.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

You know that bit on YouTube where Mr Tube decides that you want to watch things linked to recent searches? It appears that there is nothing more I would like than to watch knife sharpening videos. OK, ok., I've actually watched a couple now so I will be offered them to the end of time.

Anyhow, there was one that I thought was worth passing on, with Mino Tsuchida, who is "Mr Global". It occured to be that calling his company "Global" does have hints of "Welease Wodger!" about it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SIw5ChGOADE

T42

  • Tea tank
MrsT has bought a Brita jug.  She says it makes the tapwater taste better but I can't notice any difference.  What I can notice is this bloody thing squatting on a 3-litre chunk of fridge for about a litre of water.  It's a lousy pourer, too.

On a further grumble, she's also bought "reusable greaseproof-paper food wraps" that look like something you'd expect to find in a retirement-home waste bin, wrapped round a turd.  The things are, of course, opaque, so that you have to unwrap them to find out what's in the dish they're covering.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

It's true - tapwater does taste better if you keep it in the fridge.
Quote from: tiermat
that's not science, it's semantics.

It's true - tapwater does taste better if you keep it in the fridge.
We have discovered this. We have a nice glass bottle with a clip lid. Fill from tap, put in fridge.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

All that’s happening is the gassing off of residual chlorine. How much depends on your local water treatment plant but usually around 3ppm max. And of course colder things “taste” less strong.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Mrs Pingu

  • Who ate all the pies? Me
    • Twitter
Weirdly I prefer my tap water warm. To the extent that I'll drink it semi warm out of the kettle. I think that's more to do with sensitive teeth and brain freeze though.
Plus up here in the northron wastes we have delicious water without all that mank you have in certain areas darn sarf.
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
The level of residual chlorine in tap water is below what you'd likely smell (and the smell usually attributed to chlorine is actually the reaction products of chlorine and organic materials, of which there should be little to none in tap water, that's why swimming pools smell, chloramines are pungent). I've sniffed actual unadulterated chlorine so you don't have to, but it doesn't smell like bleach, but it does smell like ouch*. The taste in tap water is usually attributable to the mineral content (in part from the source, leaching from pipes, and flocculents etc. used in processing). Cooling will simply reduce the taste. We have a filter in our fridge, I mostly don't bother (the pipework also goes mouldy quite quickly, I'd rather have mould-free direct from the tap thanks.

*one of my many ian-does-stupid-for-money student jobs was bleaching flour**, which is done with either chlorine gas (made in a special machine, that I was the completely underqualified captain of) or peroxide, which was too safe for the place I worked, desperate students being willing to do anything.

**flour mills are awesomely dangerous, flour dust is extremely explosive, there are dangerous chemicals everywhere,  and the rats are the size of cows, and the noise they make when they go through the rollers will haunt your dreams.
!nataS pihsroW