Author Topic: A random thread for food things that don't really warrant a thread of their own  (Read 204623 times)

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Tonight I'm going to attempt to roll a burrito.

It's much like disposing of a dead midget in a rolled-up rug, I suppose. But that's the only practice I've had to date.
!nataS pihsroW

ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Tonight I'm going to attempt to roll a burrito.

It's much like disposing of a dead midget in a rolled-up rug, I suppose. But that's the only practice I've had to date.

Just imagine how you might roll a cigar on the thighs of a Cuban maiden
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens


About £36 and a silicone handle?

Quote
Carbon Steel is lighter and easier to use than cast iron

The only way it is lighter is if it is thinner.

If it is thin, then it won't hold temperature as well when food is added to the pan - there is a reason why much good cookware is thick (or has thick bottoms).

Professional kitchens use stainless anyway.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Cudzoziemiec

  • Waking up now, put the kettle on!
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Quote
Carbon Steel is lighter and easier to use than cast iron

The only way it is lighter is if it is thinner.

If it is thin, then it won't hold temperature as well when food is added to the pan - there is a reason why much good cookware is thick (or has thick bottoms).

Professional kitchens use stainless anyway.

A pressed steel frying pan is an essential in the kitchen, only reason you might think it's not is that (a) you haven't tried one (b) you're going by a load of modern kitchens that don't know what they are missing out on.

A steel pan is the ultimate for steaks or anything that needs searing, then turning the light down has immediate effect, it's why any decent wok is steel. A frying pan is also typically thicker giving more heat spread than a wok (and obviously  greater structural integrity) Another use is pancakes, although I suspect cast iron would be better. They are also everlasting, mine is now around 40 years old and in perfect condition, if you exclude the base bowing out after Mrs Ham left it on the light for an hour a few years ago ;)

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
You can also decisively spang any uninvited demonic guests who pop out of the Hell portal under your hallway.
!nataS pihsroW

Kim

  • Timelord
If it is thin, then it won't hold temperature as well when food is added to the pan - there is a reason why much good cookware is thick (or has thick bottoms).

The flip side[1] of this is that it's hard to find a lightweight pan (if you struggle to lift heavy ones) that isn't optimised for cheapness.  We recently went frying-pan shopping, and ended up with the cheap nasty Sanisbury's one, simply because it was a fraction of the weight and the cheap plastic handle was much easier for barakta to grip than the better quality ones.  It will undoubtedly need replacing in a couple of years when either the non-stick fails or the handle falls off, but pans are easier to replace than shoulders and elbows.


[1] Pun intended.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
I have a relatively expensive non-stick pan. I have a much cheaper, but very heavy, cast iron pan which is great for omelettes. It does take quite a while for the cast iron to reach the desired temperature. The non-stick pan is aluminium with a steel sheet beneath it so that it works on an induction hob.

The trick with omelettes is that the pan has to be very hot when you pour the eggs in so that they really sizzle for a couple of seconds. Then they won't stick.

The reason that ferrous pans retain their heat for such a long time, and take so long to warm up, is that iron is basically not that great a conductor of heat, compared to a lot of metals. Says he, stating the bleedin' obvious...
Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

T42

  • Old fool in a hurry
Gas is best for omelettes - you can keep the pan moving over the flame and tip it to guide the egg flow without it losing heat.  It's also good for flambéeing crèpes. Or anything else if you're not careful.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Waking up now, put the kettle on!
When we needed a new frying pan, I was all for buying a heavy and probably expensive cast iron one, but Mrs Cudzo went to Credit Cruncher and came back with a cheap non-stick one for a fiver. That won't last ten minutes, said I. It's still going, complete with it's teflon. That was eight years ago.
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star


Got given a tin of these.  Really hard to open with a tin opener.  Had to prep the fish, dehead and remove innards.  Now how to cook them.

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
When we needed a new frying pan, I was all for buying a heavy and probably expensive cast iron one, but Mrs Cudzo went to Credit Cruncher and came back with a cheap non-stick one for a fiver. That won't last ten minutes, said I. It's still going, complete with it's teflon. That was eight years ago.

Have you managed to use it yet?  ;D
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.



Got given a tin of these.  Really hard to open with a tin opener.  Had to prep the fish, dehead and remove innards.  Now how to cook them.

I would hazard that tinned herring is already cooked! And you're probably expected just to eat the flesh off the outside, leaving the head attached and innards inside.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
I thought that was the point of tinning. You put the fish in the can. Heat the can. Get cooked and sterile fish that has a very long shelf-life.
!nataS pihsroW

Somewhat in the "what I have learned today" spirit, the chilli sauces I brought back from Mexico are available off eBay at reasonable cost https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Mexican-Chilli-Sauce-El-Yucateco-Salsa-4-Bottles-Saver-Pack-4-x-120ml/182623223261 , I recommend them to the house (especially the black label)

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
I see Sainsbury's have a brand for their cheaper canned goods; it's 'Hubbard's', no doubt in homage to Old Mother Hubbard.

I've not seen any bones for dogs...

Another Thing I Have Learned. What happens if you forget to turn up the heat when you deep fry falafel (having turned it right down while preparing) and the oil temperature drops. They disintegrate. Completely and absolutely and spectacularly.

nicknack

  • Hornblower
Another Thing I Have Learned. What happens if you forget to turn up the heat when you deep fry falafel (having turned it right down while preparing) and the oil temperature drops. They disintegrate. Completely and absolutely and spectacularly.
BTDTGTT
 :facepalm:
There's no vibrations, but wait.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Waking up now, put the kettle on!
I see Sainsbury's have a brand for their cheaper canned goods; it's 'Hubbard's', no doubt in homage to Old Mother Hubbard.

I've not seen any bones for dogs...
Got some of their tinned tomatoes as I was buying anyway, and 28p v 45p. Slightly more liquid but otherwise indistinguishable.
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Another Thing I Have Learned. What happens if you forget to turn up the heat when you deep fry falafel (having turned it right down while preparing) and the oil temperature drops. They disintegrate. Completely and absolutely and spectacularly.
BTDTGTT
 :facepalm:

That is one ***** greasy t-shirt  ;)

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
I see Sainsbury's have a brand for their cheaper canned goods; it's 'Hubbard's', no doubt in homage to Old Mother Hubbard.

I've not seen any bones for dogs...
Got some of their tinned tomatoes as I was buying anyway, and 28p v 45p. Slightly more liquid but otherwise indistinguishable.

Both sorts unavailable for today's imminent delivery here.

T42

  • Old fool in a hurry
Wonderful aroma has just reached my office - MrsT's baking bread again.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Mrs Pingu

  • Who ate all the pies? Me
    • Twitter
I see Sainsbury's have a brand for their cheaper canned goods; it's 'Hubbard's', no doubt in homage to Old Mother Hubbard.

I've not seen any bones for dogs...
Got some of their tinned tomatoes as I was buying anyway, and 28p v 45p. Slightly more liquid but otherwise indistinguishable.

Both sorts unavailable for today's imminent delivery here.
I couldn't order the Hubbard's, clicked on the 45p jobs and then what actually arrived was a subtituted pack of Napolina at god knows how much per can.
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.