Author Topic: "Accessible" olympic sports  (Read 7705 times)

barakta

  • Bastard lovechild of Yomiko Readman and Johnny 5
Re: "Accessible" olympic sports
« Reply #75 on: August 08, 2012, 08:48:22 pm »
I'd be interested to see medals by country not just "by population" as I've seen but by things like GDP and indeed rich/poor divide.  I'd also be interested to see if there's differences within different countries for male/female and other factors between amount and availability of sponsorship!

Pancho

  • لَا أَعْبُدُ مَا تَعْبُدُونَ

Marco Stefano

  • Apply some pressure, you lose some pressure...
Re: "Accessible" olympic sports
« Reply #77 on: August 08, 2012, 10:49:23 pm »
Inspired by the limpics, my son now wants to take up rowing as cross-training for rugby.

:thumbsup:

d.

Something to start with...

http://concept2.co.uk/training/rugby

citoyen

  • Occasionally rides a bike
Re: "Accessible" olympic sports
« Reply #78 on: August 08, 2012, 10:53:51 pm »
Nice. I'd better not show him that though - he'll be demanding a Concept 2 for Christmas...  ;D

d.

Pingu

  • Put away those fiery biscuits!
  • Mrs Pingu's domestique
    • the Igloo
Re: "Accessible" olympic sports
« Reply #79 on: August 08, 2012, 11:20:48 pm »
I'd be interested to see medals by country not just "by population" as I've seen but by things like GDP and indeed rich/poor divide.  I'd also be interested to see if there's differences within different countries for male/female and other factors between amount and availability of sponsorship!

http://c4news.itn.co.uk/

Re: "Accessible" olympic sports
« Reply #80 on: August 08, 2012, 11:36:25 pm »
The Olympic movement is global. The countries with the most medals are mainly wealthy. UK facilities in all sports are beyond the wildest dreams of most potential athletes in poor countries. We're fixated with school sports in the UK, yet most European countries (and all the Asian countries I know of) don't do sport in school at all - it is addressed by local clubs. The model in the USA is the opposite, with school-to-college sport at the centre of funding, scholarships and local TV schedules. Every street and field in Australia and New Zealand is bursting with joggers, exercisers and teams sports - yet NZ is currently miles more successful than Oz by population. I suspect (IMHO) that the macho culture in Oz is undermining women's sport.

The Olympic movement, I think, is trying to get more medal success across more countries - that needs co-operation and accessibility. The tiny size of some contingents in the athletes' parade at the opening ceremony was shocking.

Any suggestions about how to fix that?

Why is it shocking? Maybe competitive sport is not important in some cultures, or they might have other things to get on with. Or it could be they are content with their place in the world and aren't looking for international prestige.

Maybe medal success should be left to those countries that feel they have something to prove, that have low esteem and a inferiority complex. Or they might want to divert attention from divisive internal social and economic problems, and are prepared to spend hundreds of million £ on state sponsored sports people so that some people can wave flags and feel good about themselves by proxy.

Regulator

  • That's Councillor Regulator to you...
Re: "Accessible" olympic sports
« Reply #81 on: August 08, 2012, 11:54:10 pm »
Wrestling is accessible.

Iran have won three gold medals so far.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/olympics/2012/medals/sports/wrestling

The USA Olympic squad will probably invade the Iranian team accommodation, claiming that the medals are made of yellow cake illegally obtained from Niger...
Quote from: clarion
I completely agree with Reg.

Green Party Councillor

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: "Accessible" olympic sports
« Reply #82 on: August 09, 2012, 11:10:09 am »
IOC levies on rich IOC members (as a condition of participation), to be spent on financing athletes from poor countries.

Allow athletes to represent one country in non-Olympic competitions, but revert to their country of birth for the Olympics, so not cutting off (though it might reduce) the flow of money from rich countries poaching poor country athletes.
But some of those athletes might be refugees from, or have been renounced by, their country of birth. In some cases their country of birth might not even exist anymore!
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Re: "Accessible" olympic sports
« Reply #83 on: August 09, 2012, 02:56:27 pm »
I said allow, not require.
"A woman on a bicycle has all the world before her where to choose; she can go where she will, no man hindering." The Type-Writer Girl, 1897