Author Topic: Pronunciation that makes you cringe  (Read 67818 times)

T42

  • Old fool in a hurry
Re: Pronunciation that makes you cringe
« Reply #650 on: June 16, 2020, 10:47:40 am »
Shame: GE&H is magnificent.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Pronunciation that makes you cringe
« Reply #651 on: June 16, 2020, 11:56:30 am »
Mary Anne Hobbs frequently has me shouting at the radio for her mangling of words, but she hit new heights last week when reading the title of a piece as "in E B minor".

I like Mary Anne Hobbs. She plays a good selection of music, and she has a good voice for radio. But she's just not very bright.
Was the next piece in D hash major?
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Re: Pronunciation that makes you cringe
« Reply #652 on: June 16, 2020, 01:05:37 pm »
Mrs Pcolbeck once had a new teacher in the class she is TA for that was straight out of college and was from the Home Counties.
He was trying to teach the kids spelling and pronunciation of new words by matching them with other words that rhymed.
The thing was that almost every pair of words he came up with may have rhymed in Surrey but in North Yorkshire they certainly didn't. Mrs Pcolbeck was crying laughing.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

nicknack

  • Hornblower
Re: Pronunciation that makes you cringe
« Reply #653 on: June 16, 2020, 01:16:36 pm »
Mary Anne Hobbs frequently has me shouting at the radio for her mangling of words, but she hit new heights last week when reading the title of a piece as "in E B minor".

I like Mary Anne Hobbs. She plays a good selection of music, and she has a good voice for radio. But she's just not very bright.
Was the next piece in D hash major?
Unlikely. That would be 9 'hashes' for 7 notes.
There's no vibrations, but wait.

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: Pronunciation that makes you cringe
« Reply #654 on: June 16, 2020, 01:23:11 pm »
Mary Anne Hobbs frequently has me shouting at the radio for her mangling of words, but she hit new heights last week when reading the title of a piece as "in E B minor".

I like Mary Anne Hobbs. She plays a good selection of music, and she has a good voice for radio. But she's just not very bright.
Mitchell and Webb. F hashtag minor.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p01mv2zh

(Interestingly (FSVO interstingly...) typing "F hastag minor" into google returned answers for F sharp)
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Re: Pronunciation that makes you cringe
« Reply #655 on: June 16, 2020, 01:47:23 pm »
Mrs Pcolbeck once had a new teacher in the class she is TA for that was straight out of college and was from the Home Counties.
He was trying to teach the kids spelling and pronunciation of new words by matching them with other words that rhymed.
The thing was that almost every pair of words he came up with may have rhymed in Surrey but in North Yorkshire they certainly didn't. Mrs Pcolbeck was crying laughing.
I once read a story of a teacher in similar circumstances whose class informed her that the opposite of "appear" was "down there"...

ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Pronunciation that makes you cringe
« Reply #656 on: June 16, 2020, 02:16:45 pm »
One of those things about growing up a bit pikey in the part of the UK that speaks a dialect that only resembles English to someone who's had an ear candling mishap is that you spend a life being corrected on pronunciation and other little details. Don't you mean?, they'll say, pedantically. As a child, I learned most everything from books so pronunciation often had to be guessed at using the peculiarly tuned phonetics of the region. It wasn't like I could ask my mum how to pronounce 'Achilles' or 'diplodocus' or somesuch and it was before the time you could hit a button and have the computer tell you. Or 'chorizo,' though that had yet to become a menu item, the most exotic thing in the early 1980's East Midlands still came in a box labelled Vesta (not that I was allowed, as it would 'make the house smell', presumably of something other than cigarette smoke and perpetual overcooking, the madeleines of my childhood).

People still do it today, especially with foreign words (and I think often they're making them up, or adding that signature English theatrical flourish). Generally, I smile tolerantly, wait till they turn their backs and murder them. OK, I wouldn't have have done the 'E B minor' – though all I remember from music lessons at my school was the xylophone didn't have a full complement of keys and the C was quite an important omission – but mostly because I used to attempt to play the guitar (I suspect less down to a deep, abiding love for music, but more because my misguided brain thought a series of badly played chords would somehow feature as an aphrodisiac for female company, but anyway, I could play all the notes flat).
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Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Pronunciation that makes you cringe
« Reply #657 on: June 16, 2020, 02:21:29 pm »
anyway, I could play all the notes flat).
If you play all the notes flat, you're making a hash of them.


Sorry.


Okay, I'm not really.
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Re: Pronunciation that makes you cringe
« Reply #658 on: June 16, 2020, 06:27:02 pm »
"A Scientist" on the anbaric distascope referring to those dangly things found in caves as "sta-LAGG-tites".  Get in the sea.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Re: Pronunciation that makes you cringe
« Reply #659 on: June 16, 2020, 06:58:03 pm »
One of those things about growing up a bit pikey in the part of the UK that speaks a dialect that only resembles English to someone who's had an ear candling mishap is that you spend a life being corrected on pronunciation and other little details. Don't you mean?, they'll say, pedantically. As a child, I learned most everything from books so pronunciation often had to be guessed at using the peculiarly tuned phonetics of the region. It wasn't like I could ask my mum how to pronounce 'Achilles' or 'diplodocus' or somesuch and it was before the time you could hit a button and have the computer tell you. Or 'chorizo,' though that had yet to become a menu item, the most exotic thing in the early 1980's East Midlands still came in a box labelled Vesta (not that I was allowed, as it would 'make the house smell', presumably of something other than cigarette smoke and perpetual overcooking, the madeleines of my childhood).

People still do it today, especially with foreign words (and I think often they're making them up, or adding that signature English theatrical flourish). Generally, I smile tolerantly, wait till they turn their backs and murder them. OK, I wouldn't have have done the 'E B minor' – though all I remember from music lessons at my school was the xylophone didn't have a full complement of keys and the C was quite an important omission – but mostly because I used to attempt to play the guitar (I suspect less down to a deep, abiding love for music, but more because my misguided brain thought a series of badly played chords would somehow feature as an aphrodisiac for female company, but anyway, I could play all the notes flat).
Vesta is still available in pretty much the same options as the 80s. As ready meals, by modern standards, they aren’t very ready.


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ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Pronunciation that makes you cringe
« Reply #660 on: June 16, 2020, 07:37:27 pm »
I never had one. I used to gaze at them wistfully in the supermarket only to be dragged away by my mother. To be honest, I was a bit scared too – I never had any kind of 'ethnic' food (not even pretend) till I got to university. We did have a Chinese takeaway when I was growing up (delightfully called the 'Chinky' by everyone, probably still is) though we never went. Obviously. Fish and chips once a week though.

My mother is a bit extreme, she lives entirely off cheese cobs and has done since about 1978 when she ate something she didn't like and decided why take another chance. She refuses to believe that olive oil is for anything but cleaning ears and the colour of curry sauce makes her physically sick. My fathers claimed aversion to garlic is only rivalled by Dracula. But Dracula, I feel sure, is never found halfway through noshing a table-sized family pizza.
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T42

  • Old fool in a hurry
Re: Pronunciation that makes you cringe
« Reply #661 on: June 17, 2020, 09:09:34 am »
Mary Anne Hobbs frequently has me shouting at the radio for her mangling of words, but she hit new heights last week when reading the title of a piece as "in E B minor".

I like Mary Anne Hobbs. She plays a good selection of music, and she has a good voice for radio. But she's just not very bright.
Mitchell and Webb. F hashtag minor.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p01mv2zh

(Interestingly (FSVO interstingly...) typing "F hastag minor" into google returned answers for F sharp)

We had a couple at school we called F sharp major and B flat minor.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.