Author Topic: "1 in 3 regular cyclists knocked off" (Or 1 in 2 in That London)  (Read 2164 times)

Re: "1 in 3 regular cyclists knocked off" (Or 1 in 2 in That London)
« Reply #25 on: November 20, 2012, 01:21:36 pm »
I can't really comment about London as I rarely cycle there. However. I've just spent 3 days up in Glasgow and was astounded by the number of cycle with cycle collisions and those who merely parted company from their own bikes without outside assistance

If I can try and identify some common factors I can state that they were:
1) all riding fixies
2) all wearing lycra
3) wearing lycra with a Sky logo on it definitely upped your chances of coming off

On second thoughts, perhaps I should have extended my survey from beyond the confines of the velodrome.

[EDIT - over the 3 days, 5 of the GB men's squad of 9 crashed... so that's just over 1 in 2 riders - sounds about right to tie in with London. Hang on - that was over 3 days... What time period did the original article quote?]

Re: "1 in 3 regular cyclists knocked off" (Or 1 in 2 in That London)
« Reply #26 on: November 20, 2012, 08:31:48 pm »
I've just had a couple of days working in that London.

Every time I go I end up feeling ashamed of the behaviour of a significant number of people on bikes (I won't call them cyclists, as I don't think that they probably share any philosophy with the people I ride with and have ridden with). If they rode like that in a road race they'd be disqualified; on a club run and they'd be asked to leave.

I passed Parliament Square twice a day. That's where the law makers are. What chance have we of any really supportive legislation when what they see day in and day out is some sort of two-wheeled anarchy?

One chap this morning was trying to edge over the line against a red, and to intimidate me (crossing on the green man) into giving way to him. I glared at him and he became abusive.

I'm sorry, I ride a bike, and have done for about 50 years. I've raced (with modest results) all over Europe, I've a history of club membership, I've contributed to cycling as an official and in clubs, I've helped out newcomers with kit and advice - and I have nothing at all in common with these people, and I resent the effect they are having on my image as a cyclist.

If it's only 1 in 2 cyclist in London who are coming off then they are damn lucky. From my observation, many aren't being "knocked off" - they are riding in a careless and crazy manner, which may lead to collisions.

To be honest, most drivers seemed to be much more tolerant than they are around here. The black cab I had was fantastic in my view, anticipating the thoughtless changes of lane and direction by some people on bikes.

Re: "1 in 3 regular cyclists knocked off" (Or 1 in 2 in That London)
« Reply #27 on: November 20, 2012, 09:12:11 pm »
My view entirely.

I used to get wound up by the Matthew Parris/Nigel Havers stuff, but I can see where they are coming from having witnessed the same utter twattery you describe.

It is a shame that we get the backwash from this out here.


Re: "1 in 3 regular cyclists knocked off" (Or 1 in 2 in That London)
« Reply #28 on: November 20, 2012, 09:14:52 pm »
... Every time I go I end up feeling ashamed of the behaviour of a significant number of people on bikes (I won't call them cyclists, as I don't think that they probably share any philosophy with the people I ride with and have ridden with).

  ...

To be honest, most drivers seemed to be much more tolerant than they are around here. The black cab I had was fantastic in my view, anticipating the thoughtless changes of lane and direction by some people on bikes.

I'm afraid that's fairly typical of London, although it seems to get worst at the busier times, presumably as a form of peer pressure.

I deliberately avoid commuting at typical busy times, to avoid both the increased number of motorised road users, but also the greater numbers of unpowered two wheelers.

Cycling along Queenstown Road, which has a high incidence of both, due to the focusing nature of Chelsea Bridge to cross the Thames, if I cycle along the road at peak times, I get continuously overtaken by cyclists ignoring red traffic lights, which I then overtake a couple of minutes later, until I stop at another red light, and the cycle continues.

When I get to Embankment on the north side of Chelsea Bridge, a noticeable majority of cyclists will go straight through the lights on red, albeit relatively safely (but illegally).  A small handful will go through ludicrously dangerously, and another small handful (including myself) will actually wait for the light to go green, behind the white line.  Out of a dozen cyclists arriving at the red lights, it's not unusual to only have two or three waiting for them to change.  It does depend on the traffic levels.  If there are a lot of cars driving across on their green phase, you will of course get most of the cyclists waiting for the lights to change, but a lot will still edge across the white line to get as far forward as they can, which is still effectively jumping the red light (and often still a bit dangerous, and inconsiderate, the white line isn't back from the junction because it looks prettier that way).

The redeeming characteristic, is as you say, that car drivers have learnt to tolerate a lot of this behaviour.  Of course, there are equally a few insane car drivers who decide that in exchange for the badly behaved cycling, they're allowed to behave aggressively towards cyclists, ignoring the fact that in both cases, the people who will end up paying the most, are the cyclists.  Unfortunately, even if that's only one in a thousand cars, given the large number of cars on the road for much of the day, I'll still meet several of them on every commute.

It obviously mostly works, and I don't believe the rate in the original article is a realistic metric of actual accidents, and incidence of near misses (being very close to almost being an accident).
Actually, it is rocket science.