Author Topic: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop  (Read 51665 times)

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #325 on: January 06, 2018, 09:01:34 pm »
It's been quite a busy week in the workshop at work - Inspection & Maintenance contractors in for fixed machines - lathes,bandsaws,etc (I've had to sort out some problems challenges they found), 45 ukelele kits to machine, and lots of clearing up. Not much time for work on the Speedy.

I did find time to get a bit done on the seat:-

More coats of wax and a coat of mould release spray...



...then a gelcoat...



...and a few layers of glass mat and polyester resin.





Working with composites is much more difficult than most people imagine - it took 3 hours to get to that stage and cleared up.  :facepalm:

By the next day the resin has set, and can be given a haircut with scissors...



...before being trimmed with a jigsaw and sanded to the edge of the original seat.



The next stage is to separate the original seat from the mould.



We are still at the 'will it? won't it?' stage of getting it out...

 :-\
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Torslanda

  • Professional Gobshite
  • Just a tart for retro kit . . .
    • John's Bikes
Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #326 on: January 06, 2018, 11:43:32 pm »
Rims. A popular conversion is to 406. It changes the castor angle slightly but Redshift (#176 was originally built with Moulton rims) doesn't experience any odd handling and she's had hers over 15 years. Also means you can fit Kojaks, halving the cost of tyres

The SA hubs were modified with bigger inner bearings, I believe the axles were bespoke items, too.
VELOMANCER

Well that's the more blunt way of putting it but as usual he's dead right.

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #327 on: January 07, 2018, 10:28:23 am »
I wish I had know that the 406 conversion works - I'd read that the frame geometry was altered when the production models went to that size.
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #328 on: January 07, 2018, 01:37:04 pm »
Using 406s is probably an even bigger money saver than that.  Saturday: my grate frend Mr Sheen fits a brand new pair of Wolbers to his Speedy.  Sunday: racing at Eastway.  By the end of the day both tyres were shagged, even though he swapped left and right during the lunch break.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #329 on: January 07, 2018, 07:21:28 pm »
I was more concerned about it affecting the centre-point steering than castor angle.
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Torslanda

  • Professional Gobshite
  • Just a tart for retro kit . . .
    • John's Bikes
Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #330 on: January 08, 2018, 09:40:33 am »
ISTR reading that speedy has neither centrepoint NOR Ackermann steering.

BICBW...
VELOMANCER

Well that's the more blunt way of putting it but as usual he's dead right.

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #331 on: January 08, 2018, 11:21:21 am »
ISTR a chap called Burrows writing "if you want to start an argument with a trike designer ask him whether he uses Ackermann steering geometry".

Note to self: find out what my chum Mr Bird is using on his long-gestating racing trike.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #332 on: January 08, 2018, 03:26:56 pm »
I remember the same Burrows gentleman shouting to Dave Wrath-Sharman, who was riding one of the first Greenspeed trikes in the UK, to "Try pulling just one brake on, then", and being very annoyed that Mr Wrath-Sharman raised one arm above his head, locked one wheel and kept a completely straight path. (I believe this was at a Wolverhampton BHPC meet)

I'd guess the Wincheetah doesn't have perfect centre point or Ackermann, but has an element of both. I would expect with larger front wheels it would be even less centrey point, unless you did something stupid like dishing the wheels...
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #333 on: January 08, 2018, 04:17:14 pm »
Mr Wrath-Sharman raised one arm above his head, locked one wheel and kept a completely straight path.
Howzat possible? Sounds like the "active yaw control" witchcraft that Mitsubishi used to make the Evo turn in faster than a 4wd car has any right to.

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #334 on: January 09, 2018, 01:21:23 pm »
Back in the Olden Days a trick used by Windcheetah racers was to slacken the RH brake cable right off to aid turn-in for the Eastway hairpin.  It was important to rebalance the brakes before riding home :D
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #335 on: January 09, 2018, 08:35:13 pm »
Well the seat popped out of the mould. I used a 80mm wide strip of 6mm MDF (offcut) shoved down, around the curve between the seat and the mould. A few areas of filler stuck fast and I'll have to clean these off and 'dress' the mould before I can make a new seat. I will probably repair the original seat with carbon/glass tape and Kevlar resined on the inside.



The shape would also probably work well as a front fairing too. If the new seat turns out OK, I might make a fairing too.  :D

As the speedy doesn't have any capabilty to carry anything, I fancy making a tailbox for it too, but that can be done once the machine is restored to roadworthyness-ness.

Next, I need to decide on 369 or 406 (17" OR 20") wheels...  :-\
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #336 on: January 09, 2018, 08:39:48 pm »
Mr Wrath-Sharman raised one arm above his head, locked one wheel and kept a completely straight path.
Howzat possible? Sounds like the "active yaw control" witchcraft that Mitsubishi used to make the Evo turn in faster than a 4wd car has any right to.

Back in the mid '90s, Greenspeed absolutly nailed tadpole trike steering geometry. It's the trike I would have chosen at the time, had I the money to buy one.
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Torslanda

  • Professional Gobshite
  • Just a tart for retro kit . . .
    • John's Bikes
Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #337 on: January 10, 2018, 11:11:43 am »
Not stopping you from fitting a tailbox but I happen to have a Speedy rack in the shed. #justsayin'
VELOMANCER

Well that's the more blunt way of putting it but as usual he's dead right.

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #338 on: January 10, 2018, 12:39:56 pm »
Not stopping you from fitting a tailbox but I happen to have a Speedy rack in the shed. #justsayin'

<Like>
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Torslanda

  • Professional Gobshite
  • Just a tart for retro kit . . .
    • John's Bikes
Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #339 on: January 11, 2018, 12:01:57 am »
 :thumbsup:
VELOMANCER

Well that's the more blunt way of putting it but as usual he's dead right.

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #340 on: January 14, 2018, 04:20:05 pm »
The spokes for the rear wheel were delivered last week, so, one evening earlier in the week, I laced the wheel. Today's dry (but cold) weather gave me an oppotunity to get the frame out and give it a clean...



...loosen the clamps and drift out the old bearings...



...and fit the new bearings and rear wheel, ready for trueing (it doesn't fit in the normal jig.



An old seatpost was used as a drift to drive the new bearing on/in, but that was a job that needed three hands, so no photos of it being done.



 :thumbsup:

If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #341 on: January 16, 2018, 08:45:18 pm »
Bollocks - another image hosting service FAAAAAAAAAAAAAAIIIIIIIIIIILLL.  :facepalm:
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #342 on: January 16, 2018, 08:47:14 pm »
Last night was mostly spent unspoking a 406 rim (one of a pair of front rims), so that I can measure and order spokes to build them on the drum brakes.

 
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #343 on: January 17, 2018, 10:07:50 pm »
No pictures update:

  • Supplier phoned to check spoke order, and says front wheel spokes (155mm) ordered last night are in stock and will be dispatched today.  :D
  • Most of bondo left on seat mould sanded off  with a small sanding drum on rechargeable drill  :D - lots of hand sanding to do yet.  :-\
  • Rear wheel tensioned and trued  :thumbsup:
  • Gave up trying to fit the tyre - it's not easy when the wheel is fitted to the trike frame and the tube is a bit bulky for the tyre.  :facepalm:

Edit: ...and photos of Kart and Windcheetah uploaded on to another photohost.  >:(
Still have all the Botophucket ones to do.  >:( >:( >:(
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #344 on: January 19, 2018, 08:48:36 pm »
Remember these bits?







Well, a colleague's husband works for the Welding Institute...

He also has a home workshop and is a keen amateur welder...

He got a new TIG welding setup in November...

Before Christmas, I asked my colleague if he would take a look at the bits and let me know if he thought a welded repair was possible. The answer came back that it should be possible, and would I like him to have a go at it?  :D ;)

I've just got them back:









If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #345 on: January 20, 2018, 09:23:40 pm »
Niiiice.
 ;D

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #346 on: January 20, 2018, 09:53:12 pm »
 :thumbsup:

Spokes for the front wheels arrived on Friday too.  :)

One wheel laced this afternoon, and the old 17" rim stripped from the hub.

I may need to replace a bearing in this hub, and now that it will fit on the lathe, I'll probably skim the surface of the drum too.
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #347 on: January 22, 2018, 11:04:39 pm »
The bearing in the front hub brake had completely seized, so it's been drifted out and a new one ordered. The hubs take 28mm bearings - I think the bike Sturmey Archer brake hubs are 26mm Od bearings, so I think Mike/AVD use the wheelchair version of the hubs, designed to have 12mm ID bearings (the Speedy axle is 12mm on the inboard end, tapering to 10mm on the outside.

The seat is now going to be the hold-up on making progress with the trike. Working with composites needs a heated workshop, and quite a bit of time in one session. Home workshop is unheated (and toooo cluttered) and at work, I can only do short 'lunchtime' sessions. I'm hoping to 'save some lunchtimes up' to be able to have an afternoon session during half term.
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #348 on: January 23, 2018, 07:10:36 pm »
Castings painted and will now be left for the paint to harden off.  :thumbsup:





 :D

If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #349 on: January 31, 2018, 10:59:56 pm »
With a busy week at work, and Mother-in-law being hospitalised at the weekend (now slowly improving), progress on the Speedy has been slow.

  • Stuck bits of filler sanded off the seat mould. I need to fill a couple of small bits and then start rubbing smooth with wet & dry paper and waxing.
  • Both front wheels now built. Seized bearing replaced and I tensioned and trued them this evening.
  • Trackrods removed and the ends unseized lubed and replaced with the spacers in the right place.

Last week I grabbed a bit of stainless steel sheet from the skip. Today I guillotined a strip off...



...bent it round a bit of 2" tube...



...turned and tapped a brass boss...



...and silver soldered it on the strip.

This is to make a clamp-on replacement for the broken spoon-brake mount.



Alot of riders remove the spoon parking brake, but I like that such a radical bike employs such ancient technology - and Mike designed an elegant component, so I want to reinstate it.  :smug:
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...