Author Topic: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014  (Read 38921 times)

Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #550 on: September 15, 2014, 03:19:51 pm »
Hi all, a quick write up, still tired so some of it might not make sense at all. Will scrub up for Arrive - and I need help with some of the names!

+++++++++++++++++++++

After an early drive up from London I spent the first leg sorting out how fast I felt like riding, and spent a lot of it with a lovely couple from Wiltshire doing their first 600 too. I am not sure I have ever seen such well looked after and turned out bikes, made my trusty Kinesis CX bike look like the the worst house on the best street. On learning of their plan to get to Sleaford for their hotel I was a little horrified. At our pace that was going to take a long time (about 5:30AM as it turned out).

Did next big run up to Spalding and Boston into the wind with a nice chap from up north, a previous pbp/lel er who had managed about 90km this year and was planning to ride through. Madness. Hope you made it!

The best thing about this leg was that I had never ridden it before, I suspect local knowledge would have made it a real slog. My favourite bits were ‘40 foot bank’ which may have once been that before the road took the top 30ft off that, and ‘Peak Hill’ the signed climb to the top of that bank. Must check that one of Strava, surely the only signed hill which has no discernible beginning or end and doesn’t require a single gear shift.

We parted ways at Boston as I had previously scoped out a large ASDA on the edge of town. At this time of day it was a horrible place to be, but they had the sort of things I need - Gluten Free Chocolate Croissants no less. Score!

Being a colonial I did notice that Boston was near to New York and I figured there must be a list somewhere of once-great English towns gone to seed that have now great Colonial analogs. Boston would certainly be near the top of the ‘gone to seed’ part of that list. It’s the kind of place that Londoners like myself just forget exist. And the kind of place that the Conservative party wished would just go away. How much public services would be left in a town like that?

Grateful to turn out of the wind on the ride over to Goole, tt was here, as the fatigue was beginning to kick in in, that I had my encounter with ‘The Red King’ (to be recorded in another story).

I hooked up with a couple of the Irish contingent including ‘young one leg’ suffering with ITB trouble. Also tagging in this group was a guy who looked like he had started a local 25 mile training run and kept going (young, fit!) and ‘The Secret Smoker’ - you know who you are!

As I was hoteling in Goole this meant that sleep was rapidly approaching. Getting into the service station around 11:15 I reckoned I had to be out of the road about 3:30 to make life easy for myself. Premier Inn did it’s usual whammy of being excellent and rubbish at the same time. Yes I could take my bike into my room. No the water was not hot enough. Needless to say, I slept ok.

Setting back out from Goole I got a chance to try out my new Exposure Strada light. I bought this as I would be commuting on a range of bikes this winter and my dynamo is only on the Kinesis. All those who have the CYC60 will know the little oblong of white light you get which is, lets face it, completely adequate except for the lack of spread. But add in an Exposure running at 40% on ‘dip’ and it’s perfect with the exposure doing broad and the B&M doing ‘deep’. Lovely. I hadn’t intended to use this combo like that but it will be my default night setting now I think, having easily enough juice for all night on that power setting.

At Gainsborogh I caught up with the Team GoGo and team Irish, Young One Leg having progressed from Sore to Really F**cking Sore. I set off alone on this leg and plugged away, feeling ok enough but still with a bit of apprehension as my last solid meal had been a Jacket Potatoe in Whittelsey, other than that I had been following my primary food strategy which was ‘shove something in your gob every hour, regardless’. So far so good, but sometimes you know you can feel that meltdown coming, like a small obscure comet about to take out the planet. Well the comet had just come on the interstellar radar. ‘Real food’ was needed.

Now I have to confess that being a colonial and only having lived in the UK for fourteen years I have some strange ideas about the UK. Let me embarrass myself by sharing with you my perception of Lincoln. Now I have a very good friend from Lincoln who, as all those with a certain kind of ambition have done for hundreds of years, fled to London as soon as their age would let them, so my impression of Lincoln was not great. This, combined with my ignorance of geography of anything north of Cambridge, meant that I pictured it as a hideous, scratchy carbuncle on an otherwise flat, scorched plain. So it was with a degree of surprise that I came into on a lovely ridge. With views. And there is a nice cathedral, cute shops, an art gallery I had heard of. It may have been the tiredness but I actually thought that I could spend a day there looking around and it wouldn’t be a waste. Playing the inverted colonial name game I realised there is a Lincoln in New Zealand and it’s a dump (well in Kiwi terms anyway). I have a theory forming...

I already can’t remember the ride through to Sleaford which must mean that I was in need of breakfast. I got passed by a small group, no one I knew, so I graciously let them by.

The look on the already-harassed looking gentleman’s face in the Wetherspoons was not good. The phrase ‘Gluten Free’ often stresses out proprietors. They think you’ve being fussy or difficult just for fun. To their credit Wetherspoons actually has an allergens chart and I basically just read out everything that I could eat off the breakfast menu. He looked confused then just said, ‘That’s a veggie breakfast, just without toast.’ That’s what I’ll have then. ‘You know’, he said, ‘We should just do a gluten free breakfast!’. I couldn’t agree more.

After a pleasant breakfast with three others who had all, like me, slept over in Goole, I trundled out into the morning. I guessed there would be riders back by now, but I was content with my pace and  the comet had disappeared back into the outer reaches of deep space. Someone had said ‘once you reach Chatteris you’ve broken the back of it.’ Well it must be true, so I set off to do some violence.

This was probably the most challenging of Sunday’s sections. Mostly -zag - tailwind with the occasional - zig - stong cross or head wind, I as careful not to blast the downwind sections so that there was something in the tank for when the purple line on the Garmin turned left. Several people later mentioned one particular straight that turned almost fully back into the wind as being a distinct highlight, and I would have to agree.

Chicken dinner in the Green Wellie. Felt like a good idea at the time. Anyway, a chance to catch up on some other peoples progress as I had been solo since setting off from Goole. The Judith Swallow group was chatting away on one table, Tom and the Alpe de Huez on another. I chatted with a man who lived in Guernsey and had to catch the boat to Northern France to do his Audaxing, DIY. Also his first 600. The couple from Wiltshire where there too, traveling maybe fifteen minutes ahead. The upside to their very very long night being a short day today. ‘Young one leg’ came in, now ‘You Can’t Imagine’ sore. Poor guy had gone beyond the 1000 yard stare, it seemed like he had been looking, unblinking, at the sun for a thousand years.

This being my first 600 I was surprised at how the people that I had been riding with maybe an hour from the start where the same ones I was keeping time with 500km later. Of course it makes sense, mathematically, but it was odd, and then comforting. Even though I was riding by myself and keeping my own pace, I still had the feeling of riding with others. And then looking around the cafe I realised also that there were mostly first-timers in the room, but also the Judith Swallow group who had done this, well, quite a bit. Ahhhhhh, I thought, this is what it’s about - it’s probably not that much of a challenge for them, but they are still just riding along in good company watching the world go by.

I shared the ride into Cambridge with Judith’s group and got sent to the front as I had a purple line machine for the purposes of navigation. It was a little unnerving piloting them through, but I don’t think I made too bad a hash of it.

Gracefully letting them launch an attack and escape off the front on the road to Saffron Walden, I stopped for a last chocolate milk before Great Dunmow.  I knew it was a it lumpy and that I would need to keep my own pace. I knew I would make the end now, no problem, but I was prepared for it to be slooooow.

What I hadn’t counted on was every Audi in the world pouring down the road beside me. Welcome back to Essex. Man I hate that kind of road, the ones that are ‘made for cars’. No verge, fast bends and impatient locals. I was even overtaken down the hill on the main square of Thaxted where I was doing 25mph. Just because the guy could I guess. In this sort of situation I find my adrenalin goes up and I - pointlessly - lift my pace. I spent the last 7 miles from Thaxted saying a private black mass for the inventor of the SUV and really wanting this bit to be over.

The Anchor, at last. Wherein the very lovely people who probably just about run me off the road where now having dinner with their mothers. Outside where Judith’s group, the Alpe De Huez, Couple from Wiltshire looking like they had taken a turn on the tow path for an hour and Mr Guernsey. I wasn’t sure where Young One Leg was and hoped he was ok. And what about Team Gogo? What kind of hell where they in? How would you feel to put in that amount of effort and not make the time cut?

After a cup of tea and a while spent listening to stories around the table, I thanked Tom, packed a small feeling of accomplishment into my saddlebag and drove back to London, job done. First and Essex SR.  I am not naive enough to imagine that that was a properly tough ride but still felt good - I didn’t collapse, didn’t bonk; numb thumbs about the worst of it.. Now, what to do next I wonder?

 


Brymbo 2.0

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Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #551 on: September 15, 2014, 03:45:54 pm »
Saw this on the BBC website, assume it was to do with this ride:
Quote
Reply #288
We were invaded by cyclists here in the middle of the Fens on Saturday - but they all stopped off in the town for lunch, which I've never seen done before. It wasn't a race as such, more of a touring assembly. When we have a race it's a real pain because they shut the town centre off and make it very difficult to get about - and they sometimes don't tell you which roads they are shutting.
(under this story)
Presumably a resident of Whittlesey or Boston.  Some of the comments under that story are depressing, though.
So a group of people lunching in a small town is unusual and newsworthy to a resident?!
The Small Town must be very quiet!

Buying a Mars bar from a sweet shop will be news next...
There were several pinch points where groups of riders would encounter locals.  At the Moon in Boston the interested locals were astonished as the group on one table said they were heading for Goole (that far!?).  Holt's Spar in Kirton must have thought Christmas had arrived early given the number of riders and bikes in their courtyard  (I overdid it on the fig rolls here, carrying  both packs all the way back to the finish and only eating 3 biscuits).  At Wetherspoons in Whittlesey I ordered Sunday morning breakfast and was given a receipt, unrequested, with "Here's your receipt"; I fancy they'd got used to being asked.
The present is a foreign country: they do things differently here.

huggy

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Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #552 on: September 15, 2014, 04:52:50 pm »
Huggy, Tomsk, Ada, and Ali ready for the off. 0630 after clearing the hall of 100+ randonneurs had eaten breakfast, dropped off bags, and stolen pens.

Nice write up Del, I should have you cycle round all rides with me as official chronographer  ;D

Noteworthy observations have been made by others, my contribution is that at about 400km in the 5* Audax hotel at checkout time my bike transformed itself from a machine to go out and enjoy myself to a tool of transportation to get me home. A resolution formed itself in my head that any thoughts of PBP and further rides beyond 300km would be consigned to dark & dusty recesses not to be seen again...today, on body recovery bounce back a dim light is shining itself to those dark recesses  :facepalm:
mid-Essex beer & bikes videographer and occasional publisher of events

Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #553 on: September 15, 2014, 05:19:09 pm »
Thanks to Tom for organizing the ride. I had a good time and certainly enjoyed the weather a lot more than last year  :)

After managing to be late and starting 45 mins behind the pack, I rode most of the first day on my own, with company only on the last stretch into Goole. Getting lost in Cambridge wasn't much fun, plus I almost ran over a kamikaze Japanese tourist, but I enjoyed the new last section and its lack of a headwind  ;D

I've got a few pics that I'll post later; I trust someone is writing the ride up for Arrivee?

Bugloss

Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #554 on: September 15, 2014, 05:20:18 pm »


It was flat, very flat........with a slight breeze.


LMT

Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #555 on: September 15, 2014, 06:47:34 pm »
My first 600. It was glorious and it was an adventure.

Many thanks to Tom for organizing.

Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #556 on: September 15, 2014, 07:22:35 pm »
A few words from Raymond to pass on:

'Decided to give this event another try, being a non-hilly event and having enjoyed last year flatlands 600k. Made a steady start got overtaken by many riders as expected riding at a tortoise pace, including icycle during 1st leg. Similar to last year, managed to latch onto Tomsk, Huggy, Del et al train between Kirton-in-Linsey and Gainsborough, and was pleased for their kind and patient support during the night ride.  Had one hour catnap at one of Tomsk approved 5* audax hotels.  Glad to use a sleeping bag this time, after enduring an uncomfortably cold night last year. Didn't  expect a hilly section between Chatteris and Girton, as I thought Tomsk had taken the hilly bits out this year.  Pleased to have managed to finish the event within time and was fortunate that my rear wheel held up, after suffering a broken spoke during the night stage.  Hope the rider with a split rear rim managed to complete his ride.  My admirations to team elliptigo and the lass riding a trike for completing the event. Sorry to hear Big Saxon suffered a recurring wrist injury and would have welcomed his company as our riding pace are similar, wish him a fast recovery.  Thanks to Tom and his team of helpers in make this event possible.'

We saw a lot of Raymond, [of late the most prolific rider of my 'Dick Turpin's Day Out' 200km perm] who rides 'steady' but doesn't stop long.

bloomers100

  • ACME's Head of Sexual Health and Family Planning
Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #557 on: September 15, 2014, 07:48:31 pm »
Great write ups and photographs, well done everyone.

Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #558 on: September 15, 2014, 09:00:10 pm »
Great job Raymond, looking forward to our adventures next season. Might even be about for the Chris Negus 200, remember last year it was my recovery ride after another gout attack that put me out of Flatlands.

Really disappointed to have missed most of Tom's longer rides this season so no SR, the big injury was from gardening, so none of that pre PBP. completed my second RRTY and should finish on 60 points so not a complete disaster.   

LMT

Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #559 on: September 15, 2014, 09:01:11 pm »
As mentioned above this was my first 600, and the first time in a couple of years that I've done any sort of distance with my longest ride being 205 miles back in 2011. I have not done a lot of miles over the Summer (apart from the commute) and like wise for the last two weeks as I had a nasty stomach virus.

I like long distance cycling though, it brings with it physical and mental pain thus being a true test of your character and what you are about.

Checked into the Travelodge in Dunmow Friday night, and after hearing about people not getting a lot of kip who stayed at SMC I'm glad I did. Up at 0500hrs, shower, put on lycra, munched through a quarter box of Frosties and I'm good to go.

Picked up a couple of lost looking cyclists in the town centre whose bikes were facing the wrong way, got to the car park at 0545hrs to see the meanest looking low racer I've ever seen. It was good to see another bent on this ride but this was something else. And with it's mono blade and rear stay I'm thinking M5 or Mike Burrows? It was impressive, as was the tricycle, steel tourers and bikes that would not look out of place in the Pro Tour.

Checked in, got Brevet card and left at 0600hrs in a group of about 15 randonneurs. The fog was like a thick grey soup, it was fresh but not cold and there were a couple of rollers within the first few k's to warm the legs up. Caught up with a group and passed the time with someone who also had a recumbent, an ICE sprint, then broke off from the group, up a lovely 10%er and the roll down was quick heading to the Red Lodge cafe.

As I had already eaten I decided not to queue at the café, got my card stamped and made my way onwards to Whittlesey, the road was generally flat, the bike hummed and the k's clicked over one by one. And there were tractors, lots of tractors. Caught a bit of a crosswind on the straight road into Whittlesey and controlled (as did near enough everyone else) at Nisa. Had a quick chat with a guy wearing a CC London jersey. I would see this chap another four or five times during the ride which shows that these rides are not about being swift - they're about keeping going.

The ride to Boston was a toughie, a drag against a headwind with only trees (when they lined the road) offering any respite. And it was during this leg that I came across trio of cyclists of whom contained the (aforementioned in this thread) 'Italian Chap' Wearing full LiquiGas colours and riding a top notch Cannondale the thing that struck me about this guy was he looked like he was out on a day ride. Myself, I had the tools and equipment to deal with anything that should happen to my bike (barring a major failure such as the frame breaking in half) - something to think about for the next ride. Got to Boston a little after 1400hrs, ordered food which arrived 5 minutes later. A quick rest and it was on to Kirton.

A long leg, but heading in a NW direction the wind was now a tail/cross wind was a lot easier when riding. Nothing really happened on this leg, got to Kirton and controlled at the shop there. I declined to eat in the chippy.

The legs out to Glews and back to Gainsborough was lovely flat cycling, and the amount of different lights lining the route were surreal. Hellos given to returning cyclists were well received with a hello back.

At Gainsborough I was really starting to feel it, I could do with sleep. Checked the controls and the times and came up with a plan. It was now 0015hrs, get to Lincoln for about 0200hrs, book hotel, in bed by 0230hrs, sleep to 0900hrs and then make it to Sleaford in time for the 1100hrs control and then finish the rest of the ride. This was the plan, got to Canwick Hill Premier Inn - no rooms, lady phoned up the Premier Inn in the town centre - no rooms. The chap on the other end also mentioned that he too had turned away some cyclists who were now outside sleeping on some benches.

Anyways onto Sleaford along the main road which turned out to be a hallucinogenic trip. I saw a lady in the road bent over like she was washing her hair in the bath, various red lights, a man sitting on the side of the road, a tree house and also a couple of cyclists in a field although I think these were real. Got to the Travelodge at the Sleaford services - no rooms. Controlled at the PO in town and it was onward to Chatteris.

I was starting to feel so tired I was in danger of falling asleep on the bike, 'In for a penny, in for a pound' I was after the full audax experience so therefore started looking for a bus shelter. Found one a few k's north of Spalding, nothing spectacular however I had 20 minutes of interrupted kip by the church bells ringing every 15 minutes and a truck thundering past. However the edge had been taken off and I felt good to go. Stopped in Spalding as I felt ill, promptly threw up a mixture of water, bile and oatmeal biscuits. But at this point I felt really good, I had some sleep, my system was empty, it was time to move on. Got to Chatteris and controlled at another Nisa.

80k to go to the end, that's four commutes - ride it. Onwards to Dunmow, Cambridge for a cycle friendly city has by far the worst roads/cycle paths that I've ever cycled on. Got through Cambridge and navigated through the traffic queuing up at Duxford. From Saffron Walden it was hard work, 20k of rollers when you have done 580k's is not funny. Especially when it's now official that Essex's motorists are by far the most impatient I've ever seen.

Got to Dunmow just after 1400hrs. And was back to the hotel, had two baths, a shower and in bed by 1445hrs.

A few things to take away from the ride.

1. Do I need as much gear with me?
2. Need to lose two stone.
3. Need to do more miles.
4. Need to tinker with the seating on the recumbent. Currently the seat is very upright, which over time means me gradually sliding down which puts me to close to the pedals which in turn leads to bad form and knees hurting.

As mentioned thanks for the ride Tom, I really enjoyed it and congrats to those who got round.

Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #560 on: September 15, 2014, 10:39:26 pm »
A great weekend out.  Well planned and executed ride by our director sportive Tomsk.  Certainly recommend this ride, don't be put off about it being x-rated.  Great controls with multiple choice sleep options.

Blog write up here;

http://judithswallow.wordpress.com/2014/09/15/three-wheeling-shelaght-goes-flatlanding/

Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #561 on: September 15, 2014, 10:58:20 pm »
excellent write-up (and photos) del  :thumbsup:

think I did a ride like that in 2006 (South then North; slept inna field of wheat) certainly good character building for PBP

Oscar's dad

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Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #562 on: September 15, 2014, 11:55:13 pm »
Lots of observations above so I won't take up much of your time ...

Firstly, massive thank you to Tomsk for a well run event, as always, and to young Dan as well.

I wasn't over chuffed with the wind which was a nuisance every time you turned east.  Mind you, on the return leg it was a help some of the time and I know it can be much, much worse.

I still haven't slept in a bus shelter but I had a kip in a wood.  And done what bears do in woods.

Wetherspoons are brilliant and should be given an award by AUK.  I managed 3 on this ride.

I enjoyed meeting some new friends.  Pete, aka JaRyder on here was a true gent.

The Cambridge busway was excellent!


3peaker

  • RRTY Mad 25-up! Still going
Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #563 on: September 16, 2014, 01:08:46 am »
What a hard ride. Well, no mid-course VH and loads of cafes to linger in. We were blessed with a ride that had more Summer than Winter; just needed to be prepared for a chilly night under the stars. I was blessed with the company of Mike Wigley, Judith Swallow and Dave Minter for some serious Fenland and night bashing. The RS was spot-on (better for me after I tweaked it to add distances) and Wilkyboys RwGPS track proved as reliable as any purple line could be and a genuine comfort at night. Funny, did not identify many yacf-ers; must be the stupid names we hide under. So that was alotronic up-front in Cambridge. What also made this ride special was gaining an SR from a season plagued by recovery from serious neck surgery in April and my rushed completion of 400 and 300km SR qualifiers. Big thanks to Tomski for making this event available so late-season.

Stayed in Campervan o/n; left before dawn to beat the traffic and was stuck for 4hrs on the M1 approaching Luton and 2hrs after leaving the M-way. 10hrs for 140miles. Could have cycled it in that time (with fresh legs?).
SteveP

Promoting : Gospel Pass 200, YatMon150, Hoarwithy 100, 3 Jun 17.

Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #564 on: September 16, 2014, 01:25:02 am »
LMT - i think my brother tagged onto the ride at Kirton, (was riding a Blue Planet-X Carbon job) he's ridden before with Martian Cioana, the guy on the Cannondale,

Oscar's dad

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Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #565 on: September 16, 2014, 10:07:43 am »
A bit more from me following my post last night ...

This ride was my second 600 and on the first we had about 6 hours in a Premier Inn.  This time I wanted to try sleeping rough so had packed a lightweight sleeping bag, Thermarest, Alpkit Hunka bivvy bag, a plastic emergency bivvy and inflatable pillow.  Although this rig might be a bit OTT I had all the kit already (actually I borrowed the Alpkit bivvy off Christophe OTP), it packed down fairly small and didn't weigh much so I thought I would take it all and hope for a more comfortable sleep.  Here's what happened in reality ...

After leaving Goole gone midnight with Tomsk the Tank engine and his train I decided I wanted to get some kip whilst it was still dark, even though I wasn't particularly sleepy.  Rather than find a bus shelter I decided to try and find a secluded field and bivvy on the edge of it out of sight of passers by.  I spotted a lane off to the right and turned down it, the lane quickly led into the village of Haxey - not ideal, no fields.  I spotted a school but the gate was locked.  However, as I started back towards the main road I noticed a path leading off into some woods so I followed it.  The wood was very overgrown but after a couple of minutes I found a small clearing right by the path and after all the scrub had been kicked away there was enough room for my bike and bivvy. 



By now it was about 0230 hours and although I was right by the path I figured I was unlikely to be disturbed and anyhow planned to be away by 0500.  I laid the emergency bivvy down first as a ground sheet then put the Thermarest and Hunka on top - it was pretty comfy!  I tossed and turned for a bit but the next thing I knew was my iPhone alarm going off; I must have slept for over an hour.

The site wasn't ideal but once back on the road heading for Gainsborough I spotted some nice looking fields between Walkeringham and Beckeringham.  I am thinking of doing the ride next year as part of my PBP qualification so providing there isn't a risk of rain I will be heading for the fields I spotted. 

I was pretty pleased with the kit I carried.  It wasn't heavy, packed down small and worked well ...


Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #566 on: September 16, 2014, 11:13:20 am »
I can only reiterate what has been posted up-thread:

Great X-rated event with lots of opportunities for eating/drinking/sleeping.
Great route in terms of picking your way through a landscape that may not be pleasing to everyone.
Return via Cambridge for last leg was super and great fun to be 'in the mix'.
Route sheet excellent.
Wilkyboy's GPS excellent, as was having the controller at the first control.
The wind is always a topic of debate and was much worse this year than last.
The wind and flat terrain makes this event harder than it looks on paper.

In summary, a great event and many thanks to Tom for his hard work in providing a 600 event so late in the year.

Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #567 on: September 16, 2014, 11:15:48 am »
FOUND

I pair of cycling mitts left at the final control, Angel and Harp, on table 47 outside (table with HK and company).

PM me and I'll post them to you.

I have given them a gentle hand wash and rinse to rejuvenate them!

Bugloss

Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #568 on: September 16, 2014, 11:16:09 am »
I can only reiterate what has been posted up-thread:

Great X-rated event with lots of opportunities for eating/drinking/sleeping.
Great route in terms of picking your way through a landscape that may not be pleasing to everyone.
Return via Cambridge for last leg was super and great fun to be 'in the mix'.
Route sheet excellent.
Wilkyboy's GPS excellent, as was having the controller at the first control.
The wind is always a topic of debate and was much worse this year than last.
The wind and flat terrain makes this event harder than it looks on paper.

In summary, a great event and many thanks to Tom for his hard work in providing a 600 event so late in the year.

What!!!!

Aren't you going to tell about the bags of charcoal........

tippers_kiwi

  • Audax, what's that then? Oh!
    • The Road beyond PBP 2015
Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #569 on: September 16, 2014, 11:16:56 am »
Firstly thanks to Tomsk for this ride and the others that make up the Essex SR. My first year Audaxing has been a great experience and I have really enjoyed going through the increasing distances.

I thought my SR was going to be a fail when I found my spoke pulled through the rim at the garage in Gainsborough, I parted company with the Tomsk train at this stage and started walking up steep hills due to the noises coming from the rear wheel.

I stopped a few times to try some bodges which helped a little but then shortly after walking up Canwick hill things seemed to get worse. I stopped to check and the spoke Nipple was now completely away from the wheel. 2 Zip Ties later it was trapped to other spokes and things got a little better, I could ride hills again and the clanging noises had stopped.

Some quick adjustments with a spoke key at Whittlesey reset the gap between wobbling wheel and frame to about 5mm and that got me home safe.

I rode the lot without sleep in the end thinking the further South I was the more chance I could sort a replacement bike drop off so wanted some time buffer.

SR and Essex SR completed (although I am now panicking about having put all the receipts in the Brevet)

The drinks back at the Angel and Harp were fun, was good to see so many smiling faces coming in, the Audax community is a great place! For those that dropped your Brevet Cards with me at the pub in Dunmow I can confirm that Tomsk got them all!

Bugloss

Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #570 on: September 16, 2014, 11:23:12 am »
That's good to know and thanks for being the informal controller. I was the one on the silver De Rosa.

Cheers.

Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #571 on: September 16, 2014, 11:31:10 am »
A really good weekend. Thanks to Tom and team for making it happen. Church hall next to a half decent pub on Fri pm and for the arrived is a good start
Route was as expected, considering its called the flatlands. Paper routesheet was excellent ( and still in one piece as it didn't rain)
Wetherspoons did a good job, especially Sleaford for a double breakfast. Cafes were both good too - especially the cherry pie at the green welly. That is a belter of a cafe. Lots of interesting people.......
We bounced Boston and cafed at Woodhall Spa, which breaks that long leg up. Recommended.
Overnighted at Travelodge Sleaford - not my usual style, but I was with a first timer at 600k from the club. I kept up my low rent / cheapskate image by sleeping on the floor, as there was no sofa bed or put me up in the single room. I did blag a quilt and 2pillows tho :-)
I rolled in 6pm ah, with a dodgy right knee - never had that before

Really enjoyed it. Thanks again Tom

Oscar's dad

  • Cheers!
    • Feast
Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #572 on: September 16, 2014, 12:16:02 pm »
Forgot to mention one nice incident.

I was rolling into Lincoln alone and a bloke on a push bike wearing a hoodie sails up alongside me.  The conversation went along the lines of:

Hoodie: You on some sort of tour?
Me: No I'm riding a 375ish mile endurance event.
H: Fuck me that's fantastic!  Do you have a support vehicle?
M: No, you have to be self reliant on these events, all my kit is on the back of my bike [point at rack].  Last night I had a quick sleep in a wood.
H: Amazing.  I really respect you long distance guys.  What's your name?
M: Steve
H: I'm Kevin.  You know, I don't really believe in this religious or spiritual shit, but every hour on the hour I'm going send you positive vibes, help keep you going.
M: Thanks very much Kevin, that'll be great!

At which point he sped up and disappeared.

 ;D


Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #573 on: September 16, 2014, 12:18:58 pm »
What!!!!

Aren't you going to tell about the bags of charcoal........

Can't give all the secrets away!

Washing the kit, I realised how dirty it was from the charcoal. Doh!

You did a really good ride and all that wind in Denmark is doing you good.  Thanks for the tow.

I was fortunate to meet our Irish friends in Cambridge who I rode with back to the final control.  You just missed HK and LWB at the Green Welly and they laughed at you mentioning crème brule! 

I liked your cycling top and hope the "Points Battle" is resolved in a satisfactory manner.

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: 'The Flatlands' 600km 13/14th September 2014
« Reply #574 on: September 16, 2014, 12:29:00 pm »
Bugloss could have claimed his brulee at the finish, if he'd have stuck around a little longer.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...