Author Topic: The Bread Thread  (Read 20608 times)

RJ

  • Droll rat
Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #25 on: March 14, 2013, 01:18:56 pm »
I've stopped using our bread machine.

Instead, I mix 1000g of flour's worth of dough in a big mixing bowl using a hand mixer and dough hooks, and then use Dan Lepard's 3-x-10-second-kneads-in-half-an-hour method (do just that; leave another 40 minutes or so to rise; knock-back and shape*; leave to prove another 40-60 minutes**; bake ~20 minutes @240°C (220°C fan), then reduce the heat to 200°C (180°C) for another ~20 minutes until done***).

* - I divide between 2 large loaf tins, lightly greased and with a spinkle of semolina in the bottom; and shape by flattening each portion of dough into a rough rectangle and roll like a swiss roll

** - I slash the top of the dough with a serrated knife; not just decorative - it seems to help the bread bake and rise evenly in the oven

*** - until it looks done, basically.  In our oven, set at those temperatures, 18 minutes + 18 minutes works


This is a really easy way to make bread - and less faff than the bread machine because you get 2 big loaves for one lot of effort.  If you have a big oven, you could get even more bang for your minimal kneading buck.

50:50 white:wholemeal is my basic everyday mix, sometimes substituting some rye or spelt for some of the wholemeal.


Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #26 on: March 14, 2013, 01:26:17 pm »
I've just managed to get my sourdough starter started, it took several attempts but "Stanley" is now bubbling away quite contentedly, now just have to make a bit of time to do my first sourdough loaf :) 

Mrs Pingu

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Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #27 on: March 14, 2013, 03:17:04 pm »
I too do the 'Lepard method', although it's usually lucky if it gets 2 sets of 20 kneads these days, and I've not noticed much difference.

Re: the proving baskets, I was wondering if it would help with my sourdough which doesn't have any pockets in it. However it's already left to prove in a bowl, but maybe baking it on a sheet instead of in a loaf tin would help generate some air pockets?
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #28 on: March 14, 2013, 07:45:13 pm »
Re: the proving baskets, I was wondering if it would help with my sourdough which doesn't have any pockets in it. However it's already left to prove in a bowl, but maybe baking it on a sheet instead of in a loaf tin would help generate some air pockets?

Is the dough wet enough?  I think the 'holey' breads usually have a lot more water than normal breads. 
"No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everybody on the couch."

Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #29 on: March 23, 2013, 11:48:55 am »
At some point this weekend, I'll bake my first loaf. Perusing a few recipes, it seems that a strong flour is best. Whereas my cupboard contains not-strong but good quality white flour, and some nice wholemeal flour, also not strong. Safe to proceed, or would I be better getting some strong?

I also haz ascorbic acid.

dasmoth

  • Techno-optimist
Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #30 on: March 23, 2013, 11:52:24 am »
Strong == high gluten content.  I think a loaf made without any strong flour will be, at best, "close textured".  50% strong, 50% normal is probably workable (indeed, I think that works better for pizzas than all-strong).

You could probably make a decent loaf of soda-bread with not-strong flour.

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Mrs Pingu

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Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #31 on: March 23, 2013, 11:59:50 am »
I've made wholemeal only before now and it was edible, it'll just be a bit bigger and springier if you use strong too.
I like Felicity Cloake's articles where she's done all the experimentation for you.... http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2010/jun/10/how-to-bake-wholemeal-bread?INTCMP=SRCH
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

Mrs Pingu

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Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #32 on: March 23, 2013, 01:33:19 pm »
I am currently making this http://www.dovesfarm.co.uk/recipes/black-rye-bread/ to use up the rye flour that I've had sitting around for a while. The treacle was well out of date and I completely ignored the 'dispose of at end date' instructions on the lid but I'm sure it'll be fine...
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #33 on: March 23, 2013, 04:55:04 pm »
Thanks dasmoth & Mrs. Pingu.

Can you point me to a simple Dan Lepard recipe that requires only white flour - I have now acquired strong. As above I do also have wholemeal flour but it's not the strong variety. I have all the other stuff, yeast (Allinson's quick variety) etc.


Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #34 on: March 23, 2013, 05:14:19 pm »
Not Dan Lepard but this is probably worth a look

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/paul_hollywoods_bloomer_84636

I've not tried his methods but intend to.  I have all the ingredients for the his malt loaf recipe downstairs.  If I have time tomorrow evening   :D
"No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everybody on the couch."

Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #35 on: March 23, 2013, 05:33:47 pm »
Thanks - I see that I'm low on olive oil so I'll try this one I think - linked to from yours - that uses butter instead:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/paul_hollywoods_crusty_83536

They both use rather a lot of salt! What function does that serve in baking?

I like the idea of kneading with oil rather than flour, might give that a go too.

Mrs Pingu

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Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #36 on: March 23, 2013, 05:49:21 pm »
For my wholemeal I use normal wholemeal with strong white,  you don't have to have strong w/meal.
My everyday bread uses Sainsburys Seeded Wholemeal bread flour. To this I add yeast, Vit c and about 40 ml oil (i have hazelnut & walnut oil for baking).
I don't use as much salt as is in the recipes, I have always assumed it's a chef thing.
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #37 on: March 23, 2013, 08:10:43 pm »
If you use soft white flour, ie not strong flour, the bread tends to taste like stale biscuits. Wholemeal has a lot more flavour so it doesn't seem to affect how it tastes, just how well it rises.

The function of the salt is to temper the action of the yeast so that it rises enough but doesn't get carried away. I forgot the yeast salt recently and the dough rose right up and lifted the lid of the bread machine - managed to rescue it but the bread tasted pretty crap. Two teaspoons of salt sounds like a lot but that's for a kilogram loaf so there's not actually much per slice.
Quote from: tiermat
that's not science, it's semantics.

Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #38 on: March 24, 2013, 10:13:50 am »
Presumably you mean you forgot the salt rather than the yeast.

I forgot the yeast once, although the result was edible it was pretty solid.

Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #39 on: March 24, 2013, 10:18:47 am »
Opps! yes, the salt!
Quote from: tiermat
that's not science, it's semantics.

Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #40 on: March 24, 2013, 09:35:21 pm »
Still haven't made a loaf - had difficulty settling on a recipe so put it off. However, I did make nommy maple and blueberry scones. And more brownies...

Eccentrica Gallumbits

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Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #41 on: March 25, 2013, 02:13:12 pm »
One of my colleagues has just opened a deli, with her husband. Today she brought in a dozen of the weekend's unsold loaves and sold them to us for £1 each. I bought an onion loaf and a French wholemeal. Half the onion loaf is gone already.  :smug:
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Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #42 on: March 25, 2013, 05:36:39 pm »
Oh deary me, my sour dough bread was a complete disaster it failed miserably and tasted disgusting, still the dogs liked it :)
think I'll stick to normal yeast in future   

Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #43 on: March 26, 2013, 11:29:40 am »
The white loaf that's in the machine right now has risen almost over the top! I did add a whole sachet of dried yeast, which is (at least) what they recommend for a wholemeal, and white always rises a bit more. Should keep us fed!
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)

Mrs Pingu

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Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #44 on: March 26, 2013, 01:10:31 pm »
Hmmm. I bought some Allinsons Seeded flour when Sainsbury's Seeded Wholemeal was out of stock, not realising the Allinsons was white flour.
The Sainsburys states 1 tsp of yeast whereas the Allinsons quoted a whole sachet, which I thought was a bit much, so I went for 1.5tsp being as I mixed with 50% wholemeal flour.
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #45 on: March 28, 2013, 02:29:46 pm »
Does any body have a good used recipe for dairy free bread,preferably one for the machine.  I know they're out there but it's knowing which ones work, thought I might be able to save some time and money if some one one here has one that works, TIA :thumbsup:

Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #46 on: March 28, 2013, 02:35:47 pm »
Isn't bread normally dairy free?

Standard bread-machine recipe:
300g liquid 500g flour 2tsp yeast 2tsp salt
where the liquid is either all water or includes 10-20g of oil (olive or sunflower)
Quote from: tiermat
that's not science, it's semantics.

Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #47 on: March 28, 2013, 02:57:47 pm »
the recipe I follow includes milk powder and butter, I already use olive oil instead of the butter but not sure what to replace the milk powder with,
actually just looking at the book it's there to enhance the flavour, increase nutritional value, so looks like I could leave it out.
All this lactose free stuff is new to me one of our boys is intolerant, steep learning curve ahead:)

Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #48 on: March 28, 2013, 03:14:42 pm »
Just omit the milk powder.
There was a fad for adding milk powder to breads in the early days of home baking in the US. I've not found that it makes that much difference to a standard loaf.
"No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everybody on the couch."

Re: The Bread Thread
« Reply #49 on: April 02, 2013, 12:10:24 pm »
I made my first rye bread at Easter. Actually it's only 3/7 rye, the rest is white wheat flour. It looked strangely lumpy on top but the texture inside, and the taste, are good. I'll try another one with more rye.
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)