Author Topic: Which GPS bike unit?  (Read 8006 times)

Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #25 on: February 26, 2013, 02:22:29 pm »
If primary function is going to be navigation. what does the panel think about Garmin’s road classifications. What are ‘Highways’ and what ( in the UK ) constitutes a ‘Highway’.

Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #26 on: February 26, 2013, 03:52:12 pm »
I've had a bit of a poke about in what's available.  What's the upgrade diffs between the G. eTrex20 & 30?

There's nothing vital missing on the E20.
The E30 has altimeter (which has some utility, but arguable how much) and electronic compass (which has almost no utility at all) and can communicate with a limited set of wireless accessories (heart rate, cadence - but if that sort of thing is of interest the Edge types do it better).
I did think the E30 had a mSD card slot whereas the E20 didn't, but I've been corrected on that one in another thread, apparently they both do.

I'd get an E30 for the altimeter and the related functions that go with it - but to be quite clear, the E20 will log 'elevation' just the same, but using GPS fixes.

But Edge brings the battery limitations to the table, and I'm not clear how they could be better anyway - I can have cadence / hr showing whilst I have the rest of my usual audax fields showing. What more could an Edge do?

Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #27 on: February 26, 2013, 04:13:16 pm »
I've had a bit of a poke about in what's available.  What's the upgrade diffs between the G. eTrex20 & 30?

One vital difference for cycling is that the Etrex 30 will integrate with ANT+ sensors.

fuaran

  • rothair gasta
Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #28 on: February 26, 2013, 04:44:37 pm »
But Edge brings the battery limitations to the table, and I'm not clear how they could be better anyway - I can have cadence / hr showing whilst I have the rest of my usual audax fields showing. What more could an Edge do?
The Edge can do stuff like show your average heart rate and average cadence, or heart rate as a % of max, or heart rate zones. And it can do laps, and show your average heart rate for the current lap.

Plus you can set alerts, so it beeps if your heart rate goes too high or too low etc. Or more complicated workouts, where you can set a target heart rate for a length of time etc.

Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #29 on: February 26, 2013, 06:03:46 pm »
But Edge brings the battery limitations to the table, and I'm not clear how they could be better anyway - I can have cadence / hr showing whilst I have the rest of my usual audax fields showing. What more could an Edge do?
The Edge can do stuff like show your average heart rate and average cadence, or heart rate as a % of max, or heart rate zones. And it can do laps, and show your average heart rate for the current lap.

Plus you can set alerts, so it beeps if your heart rate goes too high or too low etc. Or more complicated workouts, where you can set a target heart rate for a length of time etc.

Ooh, I would like that!

Someone should do a hack of the firmware so that the Etrex can get all the 800 series function.

Kim

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Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #30 on: February 26, 2013, 06:12:58 pm »
Someone should do a hack of the firmware so that the Etrex can get all the 800 series function.

And all the features from the HCx that went missing...   :thumbsup:
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Andrew

Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #31 on: February 26, 2013, 06:53:13 pm »
Someone should do a hack of the firmware so that the Etrex can get all the 800 series function.

Agreed. I'd be happy with a 305 with more ride history storage and AA batteries!

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Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #32 on: February 27, 2013, 05:33:24 am »
Thanks.  I guess I'd want something that would cover 'day' rides, so looks like a GPS bike unit then...

Another vote for GPS. Mine is currently not in love with the satellites and I have had to resort to my phone.  The phone (Android) is no much for having my a fully functioning Garmin Edge 800, at least for me.

Hopefully my 810 arrives today.

Andrew

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Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #33 on: February 27, 2013, 08:49:54 am »
Someone should do a hack of the firmware so that the Etrex can get all the 800 series function.

Incuding all the crash'n'burn functions and the unique ability to run out of battery 2 hours before you stop riding.
It's not dark yet but it's getting there.

Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #34 on: February 28, 2013, 08:24:19 am »
I've had a bit of a poke about in what's available.  What's the upgrade diffs between the G. eTrex20 & 30?

There's nothing vital missing on the E20.
The E30 has altimeter (which has some utility, but arguable how much) and electronic compass (which has almost no utility at all) and can communicate with a limited set of wireless accessories (heart rate, cadence - but if that sort of thing is of interest the Edge types do it better).
I did think the E30 had a mSD card slot whereas the E20 didn't, but I've been corrected on that one in another thread, apparently they both do.

I'd get an E30 for the altimeter and the related functions that go with it - but to be quite clear, the E20 will log 'elevation' just the same, but using GPS fixes.

There is something vitally missing on ALL Garmin handheld outdoor / cycling GPS enabled devices.

Its a piece of software which dissallows the device from going on roads with a 70 mph speed limit when switched to 'Bicycle' or 'Walking'. That's IF, and its a BIG IF, the unit and the mapping talk to each other in the same language.

"Garmin Topo GB, to the Edge 605, sounded like the braying of a donkey."

Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #35 on: February 28, 2013, 09:06:17 am »
I've had a bit of a poke about in what's available.  What's the upgrade diffs between the G. eTrex20 & 30?

There's nothing vital missing on the E20.
The E30 has altimeter (which has some utility, but arguable how much) and electronic compass (which has almost no utility at all) and can communicate with a limited set of wireless accessories (heart rate, cadence - but if that sort of thing is of interest the Edge types do it better).
I did think the E30 had a mSD card slot whereas the E20 didn't, but I've been corrected on that one in another thread, apparently they both do.

I'd get an E30 for the altimeter and the related functions that go with it - but to be quite clear, the E20 will log 'elevation' just the same, but using GPS fixes.

There is something vitally missing on ALL Garmin handheld outdoor / cycling GPS enabled devices.

Its a piece of software which dissallows the device from going on roads with a 70 mph speed limit when switched to 'Bicycle' or 'Walking'. That's IF, and its a BIG IF, the unit and the mapping talk to each other in the same language.

"Garmin Topo GB, to the Edge 605, sounded like the braying of a donkey."

So you mean if one is on a cycle tour and using the unit to plot a route..?  Rather than downloading a route from PC and following it via the unit...  My tomtom car satnav has an 'avoid motorways/highways' option in the prefs, but then I can't download a route map to it.
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Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #36 on: February 28, 2013, 10:04:57 am »
There is something vitally missing on ALL Garmin handheld outdoor / cycling GPS enabled devices.

Well of course !  ::-)  Nothing is perfect, by design  :facepalm:
 ;)

Quote
Its a piece of software which dissallows the device from going on roads with a 70 mph speed limit when switched to 'Bicycle' or 'Walking'. That's IF, and its a BIG IF, the unit and the mapping talk to each other in the same language.

"Garmin Topo GB, to the Edge 605, sounded like the braying of a donkey."

Try routing as a 'car' (but still 'avoid highways') - it might work better.  Especially if (like me) you have an aversion to being sent down rough unsurfaced lanes.
Personally I find 'avoid highways' cuts out some roads that I would definitely want to cycle on, so I don't even use that - I just use 'car' and 'avoid unpaved roads'.  Or in towns I might use 'delivery' (which isn't available on newer units).

It's possible too, that Topo is relatively crude when it comes to routability - that map has strengths which are generally not on-road ones.
It's not dark yet but it's getting there.

Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #37 on: February 28, 2013, 10:52:16 am »
It would take me all day to list the sections of road Garmin thought were ‘Highways’, which cyclists were legally permitted to use.
It would take me the rest of this hour to list the sections of motorway Garmin thought were suitable for cyclists.

frankly frankie

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Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #38 on: February 28, 2013, 01:37:24 pm »
I know - but my solution to that conundrum is to allow it to route along 'highways' (which may well be useful to me) but to not cycle past blue signs which say 'cyclists forbidden'.  And to use sufficient intemediate waypoints that the situation doesn't arise - using Metroguide (a different map from Topo) I wouldn't trust the routing to take me more than, say, 15km between waypoints.  Ever.  I suspect Topo may not be quite as good as Metroguide in this respect (though much better in some other respects).
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Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #39 on: February 28, 2013, 02:37:16 pm »
But Edge brings the battery limitations to the table, and I'm not clear how they could be better anyway - I can have cadence / hr showing whilst I have the rest of my usual audax fields showing. What more could an Edge do?

Take up less space and weigh less?  Smaller/neater bracket?

The Edge 605/705 battery can be changed in less than five minutes, so a spare can be carried if needed.  Not ideal for long-distance cycling, but we're not all long-distance cyclists here.
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Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #40 on: February 28, 2013, 03:03:32 pm »
I know - but my solution to that conundrum is to allow it to route along 'highways' (which may well be useful to me) but to not cycle past blue signs which say 'cyclists forbidden'.  And to use sufficient intemediate waypoints that the situation doesn't arise - using Metroguide (a different map from Topo) I wouldn't trust the routing to take me more than, say, 15km between waypoints.  Ever.  I suspect Topo may not be quite as good as Metroguide in this respect (though much better in some other respects).

IIRC, Metroguide wouldn't autoroute, so the F. Cooke 'stringer' method was used.

frankly frankie

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Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #41 on: February 28, 2013, 05:22:41 pm »
There's a hack for Metroguide, that gives it full autorouting functionality.
See Metrowizz for a free version.
It's not dark yet but it's getting there.

Manotea

  • Where there is doubt...
Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #42 on: February 28, 2013, 06:35:42 pm »
I met a bloke in the pub who said he'd been using metroguide v8 with the routing patch for years. He said MetroWizzz is incredibly long winded with special utilities and what not, and that there's a much better patch available which just flicks a couple of flags in the Metroguide mapset definition file so Mapsource can download routable maps to the GPS, business as usual. Apparently.

Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #43 on: March 01, 2013, 08:49:31 am »
I opted out of that. I made a mistake by buying an Edge 605 and loading Topo GB, which was no better at routing round Coventry than a blind chimpanzee in New York.

Feanor

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Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #44 on: March 01, 2013, 09:04:26 am »
I opted out of that. I made a mistake by buying an Edge 605 and loading Topo GB, which was no better at routing round Coventry than a blind chimpanzee in New York.

You're using the wrong maps.
Load the City Navigator maps, and all will be well.

Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #45 on: March 01, 2013, 10:24:16 am »
Sorry, I am not prepared to lash out £200 until I've witnessed a Garmin construct a sensible route.

My idea of 'sensible' is 'By Bicycle' using any road that is usable by a cyclist. ie all roads except M ways.

Garmin routing seemed to err on safety. Nothing I could do could get it to generate the same routes as the satnav in my car configured to 'Bicycle'.


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Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #46 on: March 01, 2013, 10:53:36 am »
I have a an Edge 605 and Garmin City Navigator and free OSM and contour maps (combined one file).  I use it on Car/Motorcycle mode for cycling.  It recalculates the route when you don't go on a motorway that it tells you to go on.

The routing seems to be the same regardless of which map I've got turned on.
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fuaran

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Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #47 on: March 01, 2013, 11:02:38 am »
Or try some OSM maps designed for bicycle routing. eg VeloMap.

Manotea

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Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #48 on: March 01, 2013, 11:09:00 am »
Sorry, I am not prepared to lash out £200 until I've witnessed a Garmin construct a sensible route.

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Re: Which GPS bike unit?
« Reply #49 on: March 01, 2013, 11:11:35 am »
I tried out my Garmin eTrex20 lastnight to plot a route from my house to Edinburgh for work. First I set the route finder thingy to bicycle, and it routed me along the A90 off the Forth Road Bridge, a 3 lane near motorway which has well established and signposting which excludes pedestrians, bicycles, horse drwan carrages etc... I set the mode to pedestrian and the route remained unchanged. Funny as it set off from my house and in both cases found a long cut (opp of a short cut) round the back of my estate on a bumpy path through an industrial estate which I knew of already. So now I know not to use the 'where to' route finder on Garmin devices as it either routes me down a (nearly) motorway or on long convoluted overgrown  paths instead or parallel along a quiet road.

I hate to say it, but whats crying out here is a partnership between Google and Garmin for route finding where, for instance, with a Wifi connection the device could use Googles pedestrian route finding online to find a safe route thereby reducing the processing overheads of the onboard cpu etc...
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