Author Topic: Seating Question  (Read 722 times)

Seating Question
« on: August 23, 2013, 01:39:00 pm »
On the basis theres no such thing as a stupid question.......

On a J shaped seat, such as a Euromesh, where should you be ideally sitting? Should your butt be in the curve of the J or more towards the tip of the seat?

Obviously the glib (and probably correct) answer is where you feel comfortable, but as a DF rider sitting anywhere on a recumbent seat feels odd. I want to ensure I am starting close to the 'right' position.
The older you get, the better you get, unless you are a banana.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Seating Question
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2013, 01:47:45 pm »
Bum hanging off the front edge is normal for hardshell seats.  Those mesh ones are ostensibly more chair-like, but the same principles apply:  Don't worry about where your bum ends up, the important bit is your spine - you're aiming for your lower back to be well supported somewhere in the middle of the seat, with something for your shoulders to push back against.  The pedals will take care of the rest.

What you'll find will probably happen is that over the first 20 minutes or so of continuous riding, you end up slumping into a slightly different position from when you started, and staying there.  *This* is the position that you want to sort your bike fit out for, wriggling back into some other position isn't going to work long-term.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Seating Question
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2013, 02:14:07 pm »
      with something for your shoulders to push back against.

  Albeit don't overdo the pushing back bit to much or your knees will not love you and will chastise you. 

                                                               :o
The problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so sure of themselves, and wiser men so full of doubt.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Seating Question
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2013, 02:32:29 pm »
      with something for your shoulders to push back against.

  Albeit don't overdo the pushing back bit to much or your knees will not love you and will chastise you. 

                                                               :o

This.  In spades.

You can push the pedals a lot harder on a recumbent than on an upright bike, because you've got a solid seat to push against, rather than being limited by some function of bodyweight and arm-strength/balance.  While occasionally useful for tricky hill starts and emergencies, if you make a habit of it neither your knees nor drivetrain will thank you.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...