Author Topic: homebrew?  (Read 27472 times)

Re: homebrew?
« Reply #275 on: January 12, 2018, 06:37:10 pm »
Some stouts need a few months to come into life. If space is not needed I would give a while yet before binning it.

Good advice, but i don’t think it will keep that long - it’s in one of those cheapo plastic pressure barrels that don’t actually hold pressure very well, so is likely to be exposed to air. I wish I’d bottled it, but it needed dealing with and I didn’t have time for bottling.

If it's completely undrinkable, you can always use it to make a beer and beef stew....


ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Re: homebrew?
« Reply #276 on: January 12, 2018, 11:18:04 pm »
If it's not a high alcohol content it probably won't last well in the keg. Bottling gives better maturation in the 4-5% abv beers in my experience, kegging is for drinking now. 

As an example I still have a couple of bottles of a porter from May that are drinking nicely now, and a barley wine that I bottled in December which I fully intend to keep until the next Christmas, but that's about 9.5%
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens

woollypigs

  • Mr Peli
    • woollypigs
Re: homebrew?
« Reply #277 on: February 10, 2018, 04:49:28 pm »
Hmm my last two brews has become very gassy. I know I used less primer as I have learned that many recipes are often more fizzy/gassy than I like.

They are clearly not polluted as they taste very nice after the head have settled. Glad I got a stein glass and two big 750ml glasses to decanter the 500ml into.

The ones I know I have over primed or were polluted normally his pop and out the bottles the moment I put a bottle opener on the cap. This lot need 2-3 seconds to wake up or only fizz up when I pour, no matter how slow and steady I do it.

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: homebrew?
« Reply #278 on: February 15, 2018, 08:24:54 pm »
Called in at the homebrew shop earlier to get what I needed for a batch of Coopers Saison. Hoping to get that on the go tomorrow, so it should be ready for drinking by the summer. Came to £40 for all the ingredients, so that works out at about £1 a pint. Quite expensive for a kit brew, but if the results are as good as last time, it will be worth it. Had to get the Muntons Wheat Beer kit though, as they didn't have the Coopers version in stock. I presume they are much of a muchness.

Currently supping one of my Coopers English Bitter that I made before Christmas. It has turned out surprisingly OK - a little bit of a twang to it but drinkable enough. The stout is a write-off though. Not even good enough for cooking with.

I have also sampled a couple of bottles of the Brewferm Xmas that I made a few months ago. Not bad at all, though I think it will definitely benefit from longer maturation.

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: homebrew?
« Reply #279 on: February 17, 2018, 06:00:45 pm »
Called in at the homebrew shop earlier to get what I needed for a batch of Coopers Saison. Hoping to get that on the go tomorrow...

...and it's already bubbling away nicely. OG of 1063, so should be quite lively.

Re: homebrew?
« Reply #280 on: February 27, 2018, 01:44:24 pm »
Set a couple of Turbo Ciders away this morning. 3.5l* of apple juice, 0.5l cranberry, cup of tea (4 bags), yeast**, nutrient.

*2l now, 1.5l added in a few days.

** 2 Different yeasts - Gervin and Harris cider yeasts

Re: homebrew?
« Reply #281 on: February 27, 2018, 03:14:33 pm »
PROTIP.

Don't add a metric fuck-tonne of fermentable sugars in the form of pureed fruit and a sizeable dry hop charge to a fermenter with very little headspace*.

*Raspberry milkshake IPA. Raspberries, vanilla, lactose and a healthy dose of Mosaic.

ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Re: homebrew?
« Reply #282 on: February 27, 2018, 08:18:47 pm »
Nothing brewing here, I tried one of my barley wine yesterday, mellowed very well since bottling. Now nice and rich and raising. The hops are still there but less harsh
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: homebrew?
« Reply #283 on: March 03, 2018, 07:12:40 pm »
Called in at the homebrew shop earlier to get what I needed for a batch of Coopers Saison. Hoping to get that on the go tomorrow...

...and it's already bubbling away nicely. OG of 1063, so should be quite lively.

Now down to 1008, so 7.2% abv. Tastes good too - I used loads of Saaz hops so it has a nice spicy flavour. Not as funky as I like my saisons, probably could have had the fermenting temperature higher.

Re: homebrew?
« Reply #284 on: March 04, 2018, 12:58:48 pm »
Set a couple of Turbo Ciders away this morning. 3.5l* of apple juice, 0.5l cranberry, cup of tea (4 bags), yeast**, nutrient.

*2l now, 1.5l added in a few days.

** 2 Different yeasts - Gervin and Harris cider yeasts

Set another couple away - 2.5l of apple juice, 0.5l of blueberry juice, cup of tea (4 bags, gives me about 200ml), Harris cider yeast and nutrient. I'll add another 1/1.25l of apple juice in a couple of days.

I've got a Brewferm Diabolo to go in the big bucket, last one turned out very nice.

Re: homebrew?
« Reply #285 on: March 12, 2018, 05:02:09 pm »
Hmm my last two brews has become very gassy. I know I used less primer as I have learned that many recipes are often more fizzy/gassy than I like.

They are clearly not polluted as they taste very nice after the head have settled. Glad I got a stein glass and two big 750ml glasses to decanter the 500ml into.

The ones I know I have over primed or were polluted normally his pop and out the bottles the moment I put a bottle opener on the cap. This lot need 2-3 seconds to wake up or only fizz up when I pour, no matter how slow and steady I do it.

This could be from fermentation issues or bottle issues...

Did you take a Final Gravity reading ? If yes, what was it ? (ie: VSOF being no longer visible does not mean that the beer is ready...)

What was your fermentation temp? (Too low can lean to sluggish fermentation or stuck fermentation, meaning there is still unfermented sugar in the beer)

Were there any changes in temp ? (Yeast do not like swings in temp. If it drops quickly by only a few degrees you can shock the yeast)

How clean are your bottles? (do you do separate cleaning / sanitisation soaks?)

When is the last time you replaced all of your hoses / filling equipment that touches beer ?


woollypigs

  • Mr Peli
    • woollypigs
Re: homebrew?
« Reply #286 on: March 12, 2018, 06:43:57 pm »
Did you take a Final Gravity reading ? If yes, what was it ? (ie: VSOF being no longer visible does not mean that the beer is ready...)
Brew lives in the FV for two weeks and the fermenting is well and truly over. I can't remember the numbers but both about 1005-7 and started above or near 1050.

What was your fermentation temp? (Too low can lean to sluggish fermentation or stuck fermentation, meaning there is still unfermented sugar in the beer)

Were there any changes in temp ? (Yeast do not like swings in temp. If it drops quickly by only a few degrees you can shock the yeast)

Dunno, I know the start temp (about 22-26c) was good and then the temp slowly drops over the week to about 18c. Come second week it did get a wee bit nippy (16c) as I do not have heater or anyway to control heat. This system has worked fine for about 15 brews.

How clean are your bottles? (do you do separate cleaning / sanitisation soaks?)

10 Empty bottle into a glass, rinse dregs out, squirt in some starsan, store, drink content in before mentioned glass
20 GOTO 10 if not have had enough
30 WHILE 10 (always drink while brewing) take out of storage dunk into a pot of VWP, rinse in clean water, squirt starsan, fill with new beer
40 GOTO 10

When is the last time you replaced all of your hoses / filling equipment that touches beer ?
Just got a new valve from Coopers when I wore out the old one. Rest still the same.

The fun part is the brew afterwards other than being a bit tame in taste (20g Cascade didn't have enough oomph in the flavour department as I had hoped, but hey it was a leftover brew) they are behaving well.

Re: homebrew?
« Reply #287 on: March 13, 2018, 05:08:38 pm »
Did you take a Final Gravity reading ? If yes, what was it ? (ie: VSOF being no longer visible does not mean that the beer is ready...)
Brew lives in the FV for two weeks and the fermenting is well and truly over. I can't remember the numbers but both about 1005-7 and started above or near 1050.

Ok, that should be ok. Which makes me think that your problem is probably an infection.

What was your fermentation temp? (Too low can lean to sluggish fermentation or stuck fermentation, meaning there is still unfermented sugar in the beer)

Were there any changes in temp ? (Yeast do not like swings in temp. If it drops quickly by only a few degrees you can shock the yeast)

Dunno, I know the start temp (about 22-26c) was good and then the temp slowly drops over the week to about 18c. Come second week it did get a wee bit nippy (16c) as I do not have heater or anyway to control heat. This system has worked fine for about 15 brews.


26° is a bit high, you'll likely get strange flavours from the yeast, depending on the yeast you're using. It is also best to keep a constant temperature during the fermentation phase. The yeast also produce their own heat as they ferment, so in a 20 litre batch, at full-tilt fermentation, you're probably seeing 1 to 2°C in difference inside the fermenter. ie: your 26°C just became 28°C.. ouch !

Normally that big of a swing from day to night could make an ale yeast think twice about fermenting. My advice: if you have a cellar, ferment it down there with a little space heater if the temp is below 18°C. Otherwise, you're stuck doing what the Germans did hundreds of years ago: don't brew in Summer :)

How clean are your bottles? (do you do separate cleaning / sanitisation soaks?)

10 Empty bottle into a glass, rinse dregs out, squirt in some starsan, store, drink content in before mentioned glass
20 GOTO 10 if not have had enough
30 WHILE 10 (always drink while brewing) take out of storage dunk into a pot of VWP, rinse in clean water, squirt starsan, fill with new beer
40 GOTO 10

I would actually reverse the chemicals you use at the different stages.

StarSan is a sanitiser, not a cleaner. Meaning it has no power to dissolve caked on yeast etc.  It is also acid based and can easily be denatured with anything alkaline (for example: hard water, water with a lot of lime scale in it). It would be better if you used a cleaner like your VPW or even PBW (Powdered Brewery Wash) or Oxygen based cleaner (like Chemipro Oxi) as a first step, and StarSan on bottling day as StarSan does not require rinsing, just to be well drained on the bottle tree. If you have an infection, it could also be coming from your rinsing prior to bottling.

Make sure you clean and sanitise your bottle tree as well :)

When is the last time you replaced all of your hoses / filling equipment that touches beer ?
Just got a new valve from Coopers when I wore out the old one. Rest still the same.

The fun part is the brew afterwards other than being a bit tame in taste (20g Cascade didn't have enough oomph in the flavour department as I had hoped, but hey it was a leftover brew) they are behaving well.

Bah, replace all your plastic valves and silicone hoses (and a filling wand if you use one) at least once per year. They can harbour things in scratches and tiny nooks that will infect your beer.

It might be wise to replace your plastic fermenter(s) at the same time.


ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Re: homebrew?
« Reply #288 on: April 21, 2018, 04:30:47 pm »
My barley wine has also ended up a bit gassy, with one bottle frothing over about three seconds after I opened it.  With no glss to hand, the only vessel available was my mouth. Never mind.

This was did actually have a bit higher FG than planned, but was stable when I bottled it. I put it in smaller bottles than usual, just 330ml vs the usual 500ml so may have overdone the priming sugar.

I had planned to do a batch in March, but have had no chance to even order ingredients.  I fancy making a single hop pale ale, targetting about 4-4.5%, nothing too strong but well hopped, maybe with a touch of star anise and raspberry.
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens

ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Re: homebrew?
« Reply #289 on: May 25, 2018, 09:09:58 am »
Rhubarb wine started - extracting the juice under sugar

Planning to brew my rhubarb beer this weekend as well, I had kept a sample of yeast in the fridge from the trub of my last batch made with an English ale yeast and bramling cross hops which turned out nice and fruity.  I threw in a bit of sugar and put it on the windowsill and it appears to be reactivating nicely  :thumbsup:
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens