Author Topic: Paramo Quito jacket  (Read 1176 times)

Paramo Quito jacket
« on: February 23, 2014, 11:04:34 pm »
I wore my new Quito jacket today in windy/drizzly conditions and was impressed. It's not as warm as my Alta 2 jacket, which is very good on the bike and I could just about see running in it if I was going a long way (i.e. slowly) in properly cold weather. On the bike it worked really well today with just a long sleeve top underneath and a pair of Gore windstopper bib tights. I wasn't working hard, but stayed comfortable and dry inside. Breathability is at least as good, if not a bit better, than the heavyweight Paramo stuff.

I think I've pretty well stopped buying membrane based water proofs now

Mike

Re: Paramo Quito jacket
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2014, 10:12:46 am »
I have a Paramao jacket & salopettes, 20 & 18 years old IIRC, & they've served me very well. Brilliant in cold & wet. I've skied in them in flying slush, & stayed warm & dry. Take into account how long they last, & they start to look rather cheap, as well. But they're too heavy & warm for anything except leisurely cycling.

I've wondered about the light stuff, but never got round to trying it. I assume the waterproofing is the same as my existing garments, i.e. superb, but what about the warmth on the bike? What conditions can you wear it in? When does it get too warm?
"A woman on a bicycle has all the world before her where to choose; she can go where she will, no man hindering." The Type-Writer Girl, 1897

Re: Paramo Quito jacket
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2014, 11:17:36 pm »
I have a Paramao jacket & salopettes, 20 & 18 years old IIRC, & they've served me very well. Brilliant in cold & wet. I've skied in them in flying slush, & stayed warm & dry. Take into account how long they last, & they start to look rather cheap, as well. But they're too heavy & warm for anything except leisurely cycling.

I've wondered about the light stuff, but never got round to trying it. I assume the waterproofing is the same as my existing garments, i.e. superb, but what about the warmth on the bike? What conditions can you wear it in? When does it get too warm?

It remains to be seen, but I was pleasantly surprised not to cook the other day, when I would have done in the heavier Alta 2. I think it will work throughout winter and even into early spring, for those cold blustery days, on the bike. It's an interesting comparison with the Gore Oxygen jacket, which I think is theoretically cooler, but probably less breathable.

Once the weather gets much warmer I'm more likely to wear a thin top like the Montane featherlite or such. I've also got an Altura Pocket Rocket, but haven't used it in anger yet as it has succesfully kept the rain at bay. The Quito will also double as a lighter sumer walking jacket, when the Alta is too warm.


Re: Paramo Quito jacket
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2014, 11:30:00 pm »
Looks a great jacket  :thumbsup:
I splashed-out last year on the Paramo Velez adventure light smock for cycling (on the advice of someone here) and have found it fabulous on and off the bike.  Rain, cold night rides and even some quite warm days it seems to work just fine.  It's a testament to good kit that you hardly realise you're wearing it and I find the Paramo to be just like that.  I also find that whilst others are putting-on and taking-off layers as conditions during the ride change, i find I'm just grand al the time, maybe open the vents and close them, but thats all, it stays on all ride.  By the looks of things the Quito offers even more flexibility and even better ventilation.    I like the way the sleeves roll-up easily too.
OK, the downside is that if you have to remove it, it's bulky and heavy ... and it aint cheap ... but it's oh so worth it.

It's Paramo all the way for me now.

Re: Paramo Quito jacket
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2014, 08:33:06 am »
I wear my quito all winter, it's a fantastic jacket for anything less than about 5 or 10 degrees, I alternate between v. thin helly hansen base layer on warmer days and thicker paramo base layer on cold days.