Author Topic: Exotic things you have eaten  (Read 7481 times)

Gattopardo

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Re: Exotic things you have eaten
« Reply #75 on: December 08, 2015, 10:04:33 pm »
Last week I spotted an emporium claiming to sell "Vietnamese Street Food".  Closer examination revealed that it was in fact a restaurant with no takeaway menu.  This was in Islington, mind, where there is a long and (dis)honourable tradition of words meaning whatever the bright spark at the Institute of Advanced Language-Mangling decides they mean.

Pho cough?
 ;D

Re: Exotic things you have eaten
« Reply #76 on: December 08, 2015, 10:46:18 pm »
Salt Liquorice from Finland.

A work colleague brought back several packets for about 10 people. He later admitted he did it as a joke as he found it disgusting and thought everyone at work would too.

He was mostly right. I was the only one who ate more than one piece. I ended up with it all.

I also like salt lassi  (the yoghurt based Indian drink - not the dog). Most staff in Indian restaurants in the UK are surprised when I ask if they'll do a salt lassi instead of a sweet one.

When we were in Belgrade earlier in the year we were introduced to salted clotted cream which is remarkably good. Maybe I should try the lassi sometime.
"No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everybody on the couch."

contango

  • NB have not grown beard since photo was taken
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Re: Exotic things you have eaten
« Reply #77 on: December 09, 2015, 04:35:54 am »

Do some of the chemical concoctions that masquerade as squirty cheese count? Some of those chemical names are so long I struggle to pronounce them even though I got a grade A in A-level chemistry.
Always carry a small flask of whisky in case of snakebite. And, furthermore, always carry a small snake.

ian

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Re: Exotic things you have eaten
« Reply #78 on: December 09, 2015, 08:01:55 am »
You are thinking of processed cheese food products. And they're heaven in a tube, squirty scan, or individual shrinkwrapped portion.
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menthel

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Re: Exotic things you have eaten
« Reply #79 on: December 09, 2015, 12:42:36 pm »
Salt Liquorice from Finland.

A work colleague brought back several packets for about 10 people. He later admitted he did it as a joke as he found it disgusting and thought everyone at work would too.

He was mostly right. I was the only one who ate more than one piece. I ended up with it all.

I also like salt lassi  (the yoghurt based Indian drink - not the dog). Most staff in Indian restaurants in the UK are surprised when I ask if they'll do a salt lassi instead of a sweet one.

https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=87841.0

;)

Re: Exotic things you have eaten
« Reply #80 on: December 09, 2015, 02:41:34 pm »
Went into a local pub recently, and in a food cabinet they had scotch eggs for sale at £1 each.

However, they came in a choice of plain, balti and marmite flavours.
I don't want to grow old gracefully. I want to grow old disgracefully.

Re: Exotic things you have eaten
« Reply #81 on: December 09, 2015, 02:51:05 pm »
Reindeer:
The whalers introduced them to South Georgia, and as they get culled every year we had one sent down to Halley (Antarctic).
Reindeer are well known for boom and bust population cycles on un-predated islands, as they eat themselves out of house and home.
Good, in a beefy sort of way.

Crabeater seal:
Also Antarctic, on the peninsula. We had a biologist studying them, which seemed to involve shooting them and removing selected parts. We went round afterward to collect the bodies to feed the huskies at the next base down the coast, so we helped ourselves to some samples.
Not too good, mostly because they hadn't been bled out after shooting, and we didn't get to them quickly enough.

contango

  • NB have not grown beard since photo was taken
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Re: Exotic things you have eaten
« Reply #82 on: December 10, 2015, 04:30:26 am »
You are thinking of processed cheese food products. And they're heaven in a tube, squirty scan, or individual shrinkwrapped portion.

They're the ones. I'm not sure if benzoyl peroxodisilicate (or whatever it was) counts as heaven though. It looks scary.
Always carry a small flask of whisky in case of snakebite. And, furthermore, always carry a small snake.

Re: Exotic things you have eaten
« Reply #83 on: December 10, 2015, 06:50:39 am »
Quote from: Google
Showing results for benzoyl peroxodisulphate
No results found for benzoyl peroxodisilicate

Even scarier when there are no results on Google.

a) What is it?
b) Is there a plain English name for it?
c) What does it do in food?
d) What does it do in people?
We have two ears and one mouth for a reason. We should do twice as much listening as talking.

Tigerrr

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Re: Exotic things you have eaten
« Reply #84 on: December 10, 2015, 07:27:47 am »
Went into a local pub recently, and in a food cabinet they had scotch eggs for sale at £1 each.

However, they came in a choice of plain, balti and marmite flavours.
I went into a pub down by the river last night and the scotch eggs were £3.50 each. Plus draught bitter  at over £4.
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Re: Exotic things you have eaten
« Reply #85 on: December 10, 2015, 07:42:03 am »
When in Sweden I taught at a school that had a hunting course so the blood-thirsty gits could learn better how to shoot animals.

One day I was given some vodka and it tasted mightily strange. They then told me it had had a beaver's scent gland steeped in it for weeks to give it a 'lovely' musky taint/flavour. For such a seemingly civilised race, the Swedes have some rather questionable traits...
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ian

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Re: Exotic things you have eaten
« Reply #86 on: December 10, 2015, 08:05:26 am »
Went into a local pub recently, and in a food cabinet they had scotch eggs for sale at £1 each.

However, they came in a choice of plain, balti and marmite flavours.
I went into a pub down by the river last night and the scotch eggs were £3.50 each. Plus draught bitter  at over £4.

You got a cheap pint at least.
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Re: Exotic things you have eaten
« Reply #87 on: December 10, 2015, 04:00:49 pm »
Went into a local pub recently, and in a food cabinet they had scotch eggs for sale at £1 each.

However, they came in a choice of plain, balti and marmite flavours.
I went into a pub down by the river last night and the scotch eggs were £3.50 each. Plus draught bitter  at over £4.

You got a cheap pint at least.

You think £4 a pint is cheap?  :o

Today I had an excellent pint of bitter at The Old Swan, Netherton. Price was £2.20  :thumbsup:

They brew their own beer.

It's such a traditional pub, that if anybody orders a lager or even a half of bitter, the barman rings 'The Bell of Shame' so that all the other customers know that there's a lightweight in the pub.
I don't want to grow old gracefully. I want to grow old disgracefully.

Re: Exotic things you have eaten
« Reply #88 on: December 11, 2015, 08:43:42 am »

Today I had an excellent pint of bitter at The Old Swan, Netherton. Price was £2.20  :thumbsup:


Yebbut, that's in Dudley....
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Exotic things you have eaten
« Reply #89 on: December 11, 2015, 01:32:27 pm »
I think the last pint I had cost £5.80. But it was brewed by people with beards. Those beards are high maintenance.
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contango

  • NB have not grown beard since photo was taken
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Re: Exotic things you have eaten
« Reply #90 on: December 13, 2015, 04:58:52 am »
Quote from: Google
Showing results for benzoyl peroxodisulphate
No results found for benzoyl peroxodisilicate

Even scarier when there are no results on Google.

a) What is it?
b) Is there a plain English name for it?
c) What does it do in food?
d) What does it do in people?

It hides under all sorts of different names. Hence the "or something like that" in my post. It had a big long name that I suspect the average person reading it wouldn't even be able to pronounce let alone have any idea what it was or what it does. I can pronounce most chemical names with reasonable accuracy (accuracy not guaranteed), and took the safe option of leaving this particular concoction on the shelf.
Always carry a small flask of whisky in case of snakebite. And, furthermore, always carry a small snake.

ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Exotic things you have eaten
« Reply #91 on: December 13, 2015, 09:44:26 am »
Sadly, my processed cheese food product looks quite benign. I'm think benzoyl peroxi-anything would rapidly release peroxide, so I suspect that's not in cheese food. Benzoic acid salts are a typical food preservative, though they've mostly moved to sorbic acid and similar carboxylic acids because benzene (presumably these people avoid salt because chlorine gas).

Quote
Milk, Whey, Milk Protein Concentrate, Milkfat, Sodium Citrate, Contains less than 2% of Calcium Phosphate, Whey Protein Concentrate, Salt, Lactic Acid, Sorbic Acid as a Preservative, Cheese Culture, Annatto and Paprika Extract (color), Enzymes, Vitamin D3.

Quite disappointing. I grew up on insensible amounts of e-numbers and colour gamut heavily tilted towards the oranges.
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contango

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Re: Exotic things you have eaten
« Reply #92 on: December 14, 2015, 04:21:02 am »
Sadly, my processed cheese food product looks quite benign. I'm think benzoyl peroxi-anything would rapidly release peroxide, so I suspect that's not in cheese food. Benzoic acid salts are a typical food preservative, though they've mostly moved to sorbic acid and similar carboxylic acids because benzene (presumably these people avoid salt because chlorine gas).

Quote
Milk, Whey, Milk Protein Concentrate, Milkfat, Sodium Citrate, Contains less than 2% of Calcium Phosphate, Whey Protein Concentrate, Salt, Lactic Acid, Sorbic Acid as a Preservative, Cheese Culture, Annatto and Paprika Extract (color), Enzymes, Vitamin D3.

Quite disappointing. I grew up on insensible amounts of e-numbers and colour gamut heavily tilted towards the oranges.

It runs in my mind that Jasper Carrott did a piece a few years ago (for varying values of "a few") where he commented about benzoyl peroxide being found in cheese, and how benzoyl peroxide was known to spontaneously break down into something and something gassy, which he presented as conclusive proof for the observation that cheese makes you fart.

Maybe a peroxodisilicate would spontaneously explode into glittery quartz crystals or some such.
Always carry a small flask of whisky in case of snakebite. And, furthermore, always carry a small snake.