Author Topic: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.  (Read 32508 times)

Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #50 on: August 21, 2014, 01:38:52 pm »
We're you wearing a blue jacket?

It was a teal jumper that I knitted.

Do you have a video downlink? You were looking down most of the time.

Well done; a nice little video.

Wowbagger

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Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #51 on: August 21, 2014, 02:06:25 pm »
There's a bird flying away from the camera at 3m 20s and I think it's a sparrowhawk. Not 100% sure though.
Basses lower the tone.

Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #52 on: August 21, 2014, 02:11:24 pm »
Do you have a video downlink? You were looking down most of the time.

Well done; a nice little video.
I do - it arrived the day before I went!

Riggers

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Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #53 on: August 21, 2014, 02:27:46 pm »
Were you dressed up as the 'lady'?
Certainly never seen cycling south of Sussex

Oscar's dad

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Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #54 on: August 21, 2014, 02:33:30 pm »
Dez, what sort of 'copter do you have?

David Martin

  • Thats Dr Oi You thankyouverymuch
Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #55 on: August 21, 2014, 04:26:32 pm »
Not unusual but my son's first solo sail



He's doing his Level 4 this week!

Blimy - I rememebr when it was the 'Elementary Dayboat Sailing cert' and you had to be able to do solo sailing on tidal and all sorts of other things..
"By creating we think. By living we learn" - Patrick Geddes

Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #56 on: August 21, 2014, 08:15:06 pm »
Dez, what sort of 'copter do you have?

A Phantom 2 with a Zenmuse H3-3D gimbal.

Mr Larrington

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Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #57 on: August 30, 2014, 02:06:22 am »



This bad boy was outside the hotel this morning.  Big-ass Ford V8 with two four-barrel carbs in the back.  And a cool-box :thumbsup:


Going under the old London Bridge in Lake Havasu City and making a noise like Top Fuel dragsters in stereo :thumbsup:
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Blodwyn Pig

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Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #58 on: September 04, 2014, 03:00:46 pm »





Moored at Gravesend at the mo.

Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #59 on: September 04, 2014, 04:16:08 pm »
There should be a lot more of that ^ this weekend at the Greenwich tall ships festival

ETA Were you taking refreshment at the Promenade cafe when you took that?

Blodwyn Pig

  • what a nice chap
Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #60 on: September 04, 2014, 04:41:04 pm »
There should be a lot more of that ^ this weekend at the Greenwich tall ships festival

ETA Were you taking refreshment at the Promenade cafe when you took that?

no, this was down by the PLA, /Clarendon Hotel/ferry jetty.

David Martin

  • Thats Dr Oi You thankyouverymuch
Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #61 on: September 04, 2014, 11:45:24 pm »
What is that - a gaff ketch of some sort..
"By creating we think. By living we learn" - Patrick Geddes

Torslanda

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Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #62 on: September 05, 2014, 12:54:30 am »
I think it's an old Thames barge (I'm happy to be corrected if I'm wrong).

Huge red calico sail, the boards on either side of the hull were lowered to provide stability in open water e.g choppier sections of the estuary.
VELOMANCER

Well that's the more blunt way of putting it but as usual he's dead right.

Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #63 on: September 05, 2014, 07:16:55 am »
Yes, that's a  Thames barge. The lee boards provide lateral resistance. They have to be tacked, as in, it is the leeward one which has to be lowered and the windward one raised on each tack.

They race them on the East Coast. When racing downwind they have been known to lower the stern of the tender to catch just that little bit more wind.

See also Wiki.

Den Phillips records this activity with some fantastic photos. (Her regular website appears to be offline at the moment which is a bit of a shame.)

 
Rust never sleeps

Oscar's dad

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Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #64 on: September 05, 2014, 08:18:51 am »
Yes, that's a  Thames barge. The lee boards provide lateral resistance. They have to be tacked, as in, it is the leeward one which has to be lowered and the windward one raised on each tack.

They race them on the East Coast. When racing downwind they have been known to lower the stern of the tender to catch just that little bit more wind.

See also Wiki.

Den Phillips records this activity with some fantastic photos. (Her regular website appears to be offline at the moment which is a bit of a shame.)

^^^ Correct  :thumbsup:  The vessel pictured is a sprit sail rigged Thames barge.  The sprit is the wooden spar that goes diagonally from the bottom of the main mast to the top right-hand corner (as shown in the photo) of the  of the mainsail.  The rig allows the vessel to be sailed by a master, mate and perhaps a boy.  The idea is that the mainsail unfurls like a theatre curtain so can be easily furled up again.  Raising and lowering sails is one of the most labour intensive tasks on a boat so if you only have a small crew its important the task can be done easily.

The spar on the front of the barge is the bowsprit which normally is horizontal to carry some on the headsails.  It has been raised to the vertical position so it doesn't get in the way whilst the barge is moored.

Blodwyn Pig

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Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #65 on: September 05, 2014, 09:45:43 am »
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ such a knowledgeable chap ;)

Oscar's dad

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Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #66 on: September 05, 2014, 10:05:18 am »
My knowledge is theoretical as I've never actually sailed on one. But I hope to soon, I have a plan!

Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #67 on: September 05, 2014, 10:46:05 am »
Yes, that's a  Thames barge. The lee boards provide lateral resistance. They have to be tacked, as in, it is the leeward one which has to be lowered and the windward one raised on each tack.

They race them on the East Coast. When racing downwind they have been known to lower the stern of the tender to catch just that little bit more wind.

See also Wiki.

Den Phillips records this activity with some fantastic photos. (Her regular website appears to be offline at the moment which is a bit of a shame.)

^^^ Correct  :thumbsup:  The vessel pictured is a sprit sail rigged Thames barge.  The sprit is the wooden spar that goes diagonally from the bottom of the main mast to the top right-hand corner (as shown in the photo) of the  of the mainsail.  The rig allows the vessel to be sailed by a master, mate and a boy.  The idea is that the mainsail unfurls like a theatre curtain so can be easily furled up again.  Raising and lowering sails is one of the most labour intensive tasks on a boat so if you only have a small crew its important the task can be done easily.

The spar on the front of the barge is the bowsprit which normally is horizontal to carry some on the headsails.  It has been raised to the vertical position so it doesn't get in the way whilst the barge is moored.
I think many (most?) were sailed two handed. Many years ago I spent hours clambering over and around the Cambria with my dad (ex-Merchant Navy). He joined in '45 and would likely have offloaded cargo to Thames barges in the Pool of London.
Rust never sleeps

nicknack

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Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #68 on: September 05, 2014, 10:52:12 am »
I think you'll find that the pics above are of Cambria.

<edit> Having viewed the blown up image now I see it's obvious. Doh!
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Oscar's dad

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Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #69 on: September 05, 2014, 10:53:54 am »
Yes Hatler, from what I have read the boy was optional.

Dibdib

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Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #70 on: September 05, 2014, 12:27:42 pm »


I didn't realise we had a boaty thread. Not sure why this made me think of you lot...  ::-)

(edit: no idea why dropbox appears to be misbehaving... it's blocked from work so I was trying to post from my phone. I'll fix it this afternoon when I get to a decent PC.)

Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #71 on: September 05, 2014, 01:49:20 pm »
My knowledge is theoretical as I've never actually sailed on one. But I hope to soon, I have a plan!
I've been out for a day sail on one. The volume below decks is huge!

the sail can be depowered by raising the sprit - and with a big winch, that can be done by just one person. Better than our barge, where it takes hercules to even raise the sail, or two people on the winch.  Not that we ever sail it.
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Oscar's dad

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Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #72 on: September 05, 2014, 01:50:57 pm »
 :thumbsup:

Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #73 on: September 05, 2014, 01:52:23 pm »
My knowledge is theoretical as I've never actually sailed on one. But I hope to soon, I have a plan!
I've been out for a day sail on one. The volume below decks is huge!

the sail can be depowered by raising the sprit - and with a big winch, that can be done by just one person. Better than our barge, where it takes hercules to even raise the sail, or two people on the winch.  Not that we ever sail it.

Isn't there a way of brailing the mains'l up to depower it ?
Rust never sleeps

Re: Interesting and unusual boaty type things.
« Reply #74 on: September 05, 2014, 02:47:44 pm »
My knowledge is theoretical as I've never actually sailed on one. But I hope to soon, I have a plan!
I've been out for a day sail on one. The volume below decks is huge!

the sail can be depowered by raising the sprit - and with a big winch, that can be done by just one person. Better than our barge, where it takes hercules to even raise the sail, or two people on the winch.  Not that we ever sail it.
Isn't there a way of brailing the mains'l up to depower it ?

You can do that as well - but the sail is effectively in two sections. Raising the sprit 'flops' the section between sprit and mast. The section below the sprit can be pulled up to the sprit.

It looks awfully messy compared to a gaff or bermuda rig but allows for tuning of the sails very easily. With the little sail at the rear mast and the foresails the boat can be depowered and steered just with the sails. Leeboards allow you to tune the centre of turning to match the sail arrangement.

Humber Keels had something more like a 'viking square rig' and brailed the sails up to the yard, but the effect was similar in that only two people were needed to handle the boat.
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