Author Topic: The great chip shop gravy divide.  (Read 26870 times)

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #25 on: September 15, 2008, 09:44:50 pm »
Where is it located? We have gravy on our pies here in Lancashire, where does gravy die out as you head South?

Damon.

Not in the midlands, but they have scollops (not scallops) which don't appear in london.

only place in the world I've ever seen a scallop is the chippy opposite Kidderminster station (for the civilised unitiated it's a battered deep fried and polysodden slice of potato)

Captain Cod?  Best chippy in Kiddy.

God knows I was looking for something to soak up n pints of Bathams;

how do you tell the difference between a Diesel gala and a steam gala in the SVR? the bars full and the platform's empty on the former and vice versa on the latter

ahhh bathams, how i miss it.

Eccentrica Gallumbits

  • Rock 'n' roll and brew, rock 'n' roll and brew...
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #26 on: September 15, 2008, 09:45:40 pm »

I think the divide line is somewhere around Richmond and gravy seems more prevailant around Lancashire than Yorkshire.

I never saw chips and gravy in the 14 years I lived in Huddersfield and I don't remember seeing it in Liverpool, although I was absolutely blootered every time I was in a Liverpool chippy and wouldn't have noticed if they'd served the chips in blood. In conclusion, chips and gravy is a Manc thing!
My feminist marxist dialectic brings all the boys to the yard.


Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #27 on: September 15, 2008, 09:46:05 pm »
Curry sauce is nicer.

Chip shop curry sauce?

Oh and if I said half and half would you know what I meant?

No - but do you know what a "pint of mix" is?

No idea but is it a half of mild and a half of bitter? 

The half and half thing is in northern chinese restaurants that you get half chips half rice portion.

Now a balm, that was a thing of true confusion for me.

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #28 on: September 15, 2008, 10:01:04 pm »
Sotnsoss is best. I like scollops but I don't think they exist in Scotland.  :(

I would disagree with Martin though - a scollop is a new potato cut in half and made into a chip.
In Glasgow/ the west we had potato fritters - same thing? A thin slice of potato in batter. Heaven in a fluffy white roll with salt and vinegar.

Really Ancien

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #29 on: September 15, 2008, 10:03:52 pm »

I think the divide line is somewhere around Richmond and gravy seems more prevailant around Lancashire than Yorkshire.

I never saw chips and gravy in the 14 years I lived in Huddersfield and I don't remember seeing it in Liverpool, although I was absolutely blootered every time I was in a Liverpool chippy and wouldn't have noticed if they'd served the chips in blood. In conclusion, chips and gravy is a Manc thing!

The Wiki entry on Gravy Gravy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia reckons that Chips and Gravy are popular in the Northern UK, Australia and Canada, In Quebec there is a dish of Chips Gravy and Cheese called Poutine. The Wiki entry on Fish and Chips Fish and chips - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia does acknowledge the existence of the Butter Pie but restricts it to Preston on Fridays, when it is known in Chorley Leyland and Wigan.

Damon.

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #30 on: September 15, 2008, 10:04:44 pm »
Now a balm, that was a thing of true confusion for me.

Do you mean barm ?
If so, that's one thing.
A tea-cake is another (no currants in this version)
Or a muffin ? (not blackberry, oatmeal, lemon drizzle etc).

IMHO they're all the bloody same but the name changes wherever you are in Lancashire.
Don't get me started on stotties. Must grumble.

I don't have gravy on my chips.
It has to be either Hollands meat pie and chips (I worked at Hollands during the summer holidays when I was at college- lovely when they were fresh out of the oven but the stories I could tell............) or fish, chips and mushy peas.
I don't know where the best chippy in the world is*. The search continues. Someone has to do it.

*It's not Harry Ramsdens.



Eccentrica Gallumbits

  • Rock 'n' roll and brew, rock 'n' roll and brew...
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #31 on: September 15, 2008, 10:05:58 pm »

In Glasgow/ the west we had potato fritters - same thing? A thin slice of potato in batter. Heaven in a fluffy white roll with salt and vinegar.

No, scollops aren't in batter. They're just chips made of new potatoes cut in half lengthways and fried like ordinary chips. They're for the times of year when old potatoes aren't available.
My feminist marxist dialectic brings all the boys to the yard.


Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #32 on: September 15, 2008, 10:09:19 pm »
They sound great!

Eccentrica Gallumbits

  • Rock 'n' roll and brew, rock 'n' roll and brew...
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #33 on: September 15, 2008, 10:11:53 pm »
They are.
My feminist marxist dialectic brings all the boys to the yard.


Really Ancien

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #34 on: September 15, 2008, 10:17:39 pm »
I don't know where the best chippy in the world is*. The search continues. Someone has to do it.

*It's not Harry Ramsdens.




The chippy in Achmelvich is good if pricey at £6.00 for Fish and Chips, but the view is quite good.



Damon.

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #35 on: September 15, 2008, 10:26:31 pm »
Curry sauce is nicer.

Chip shop curry sauce?

Oh and if I said half and half would you know what I meant?

No - but do you know what a "pint of mix" is?

No idea but is it a half of mild and a half of bitter? 

The half and half thing is in northern chinese restaurants that you get half chips half rice portion.

Now a balm, that was a thing of true confusion for me.

How about a "chinese" (to drink)? Again, it only comes in pints (or multiples thereof) and from the North Wales/Merseyside area.

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #36 on: September 15, 2008, 10:34:46 pm »

In Glasgow/ the west we had potato fritters - same thing? A thin slice of potato in batter. Heaven in a fluffy white roll with salt and vinegar.

No, scollops aren't in batter. They're just chips made of new potatoes cut in half lengthways and fried like ordinary chips. They're for the times of year when old potatoes aren't available.

In that case they are different things.

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #37 on: September 15, 2008, 10:38:49 pm »
Now a balm, that was a thing of true confusion for me.

Do you mean barm ?
If so, that's one thing.
A tea-cake is another (no currants in this version)
Or a muffin ? (not blackberry, oatmeal, lemon drizzle etc).

IMHO they're all the bloody same but the name changes wherever you are in Lancashire.
Don't get me started on stotties. Must grumble.

I don't have gravy on my chips.
It has to be either Hollands meat pie and chips (I worked at Hollands during the summer holidays when I was at college- lovely when they were fresh out of the oven but the stories I could tell............) or fish, chips and mushy peas.
I don't know where the best chippy in the world is*. The search continues. Someone has to do it.

*It's not Harry Ramsdens.




Well, when I was in manchester it was a bread roll.  It confused me no end as when I bought chips I was always ask if I wanted a balm.  Then after a couple of months there one of the counter ladies told me it was a buttered bread roll.

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #38 on: September 15, 2008, 10:40:46 pm »

In Glasgow/ the west we had potato fritters - same thing? A thin slice of potato in batter. Heaven in a fluffy white roll with salt and vinegar.

No, scollops aren't in batter. They're just chips made of new potatoes cut in half lengthways and fried like ordinary chips. They're for the times of year when old potatoes aren't available.

Are they sauteed potatoes?

Eccentrica Gallumbits

  • Rock 'n' roll and brew, rock 'n' roll and brew...
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #39 on: September 15, 2008, 10:42:44 pm »
No, they're not sauteed potatoes. They're new potatoes, cut in half lengthways and fried like chips. They're chips made of new potatoes cut in half lengthways.
My feminist marxist dialectic brings all the boys to the yard.


Martin

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #40 on: September 15, 2008, 10:46:22 pm »
In the Netherlands it's possible to have fish and chips; but you have to stand outside in between the two shops which sell each item; if you ask for chips with your battered piece of cod they give you a puzzled look and point next door...

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #41 on: September 15, 2008, 10:54:12 pm »
No, they're not sauteed potatoes. They're new potatoes, cut in half lengthways and fried like chips. They're chips made of new potatoes cut in half lengthways.

I'm going to try those next time I'm north of the border, seasonal you say...

Actually are they peeled or is the skin still on?

toekneep

  • Its got my name on it.
    • Blog
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #42 on: September 15, 2008, 10:56:02 pm »

I think the divide line is somewhere around Richmond and gravy seems more prevailant around Lancashire than Yorkshire.

I never saw chips and gravy in the 14 years I lived in Huddersfield and I don't remember seeing it in Liverpool, although I was absolutely blootered every time I was in a Liverpool chippy and wouldn't have noticed if they'd served the chips in blood. In conclusion, chips and gravy is a Manc thing!

The Wiki entry on Gravy Gravy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia reckons that Chips and Gravy are popular in the Northern UK, Australia and Canada, In Quebec there is a dish of Chips Gravy and Cheese called Poutine. The Wiki entry on Fish and Chips Fish and chips - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia does acknowledge the existence of the Butter Pie but restricts it to Preston on Fridays, when it is known in Chorley Leyland and Wigan.

Damon.
My Grandma used to make butter and potato pie to die for. I tried to recreate it but never got close. It was great fun introducing people to it for the first time. "What just potatoes, with butter?" "In a pie?" Then they tasted it and their faces were a picture, they just didn't understand how it could be so good.

arabella

  • no se porque yo no lo se
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #43 on: September 15, 2008, 11:03:33 pm »
well, I can't remember what Ipswich scallops are made of, certainly not new potatoes though.

I like my chips with mayonnaise.  It's usually unavailable in england (though OK on the continent)

I like pies with gracy, on the reare occasions I eat them (sitting down, with a knife and fork)
In the dark, all views are the same.

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #44 on: September 15, 2008, 11:04:33 pm »
Cheesy chips and gravy is amazing after a few victoria beers and the way the aussie do it is just spot on.  Never tried it sober, i think its one of those things that should only everbe consumed after a few.

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #45 on: September 15, 2008, 11:08:58 pm »
The dutch do this thing where they put ketchup and mayonnaise on chips, then sprinkle diced onions over the top. It's awesome.

eck

  • Gonna ride my bike until I get home...
    • Angus Bike Chain CC
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #46 on: September 16, 2008, 03:47:13 am »
Sotnsoss is best. I like scollops but I don't think they exist in Scotland.  :(

Sotnsoss was new to me when I went to uni in Embra. In the Kingdom of Fife you got sautnvinnegarrrr.  :thumbsup:

Scollops is fritters up here, hen.
It's a bit weird, but actually quite wonderful.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Waking up now, put the kettle on!
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #47 on: September 16, 2008, 05:31:41 am »
Yay, I shall try me chips and sambar! I think it will go well.
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

tiermat

  • According to Jane, I'm a Unisex SpaceAdmin
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #48 on: September 16, 2008, 09:11:51 am »
Macclesfield in Cheshire is known for chips with gravy.

That'll be the Macc Lads influence then..

Beer'n'Chips'n'Sex'n'Gravy
I feel like Captain Kirk, on a brand new planet every day, a little like King Kong on top of the Empire State

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #49 on: September 16, 2008, 12:34:08 pm »
Now a balm, that was a thing of true confusion for me.

Do you mean barm ?
If so, that's one thing.
A tea-cake is another (no currants in this version)
Or a muffin ? (not blackberry, oatmeal, lemon drizzle etc).

IMHO they're all the bloody same but the name changes wherever you are in Lancashire.
Don't get me started on stotties. Must grumble.

I don't have gravy on my chips.
It has to be either Hollands meat pie and chips (I worked at Hollands during the summer holidays when I was at college- lovely when they were fresh out of the oven but the stories I could tell............) or fish, chips and mushy peas.
I don't know where the best chippy in the world is*. The search continues. Someone has to do it.

*It's not Harry Ramsdens.




Well, when I was in manchester it was a bread roll.  It confused me no end as when I bought chips I was always ask if I wanted a balm.  Then after a couple of months there one of the counter ladies told me it was a buttered bread roll.

It's a barm (or barm cake if you're in Bolton).
It's a kind of bread roll (as are all the others I've mentioned above) but no-one calls them that up here.
A bread roll is what you have with soup  ::-)