Author Topic: The great chip shop gravy divide.  (Read 26871 times)

clarion

  • Tyke
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #50 on: September 16, 2008, 12:35:59 pm »
barm; bap; cob; breadcake; teacake; muffin; etc
Getting there...

tiermat

  • According to Jane, I'm a Unisex SpaceAdmin
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #51 on: September 16, 2008, 01:42:08 pm »
When we first moved to Briggus there was hoots of derision when I went into a chippy and asked for a bread bun, once they stopped laughing I was told "It's a teacake love"
I feel like Captain Kirk, on a brand new planet every day, a little like King Kong on top of the Empire State

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #52 on: September 16, 2008, 01:49:24 pm »
Best chip shop in the UK ? A toss up between the Magpie in Whitby and one in a little stall on Bridlington harbour.
Also where does the phrase "one of each" die out. In Yorkshire it means one portion of fish and chips (so you might order four of each for a family of four and so on). When I tried it down south they thought I meant one of everything they did and gave me a very strange look.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

tiermat

  • According to Jane, I'm a Unisex SpaceAdmin
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #53 on: September 16, 2008, 01:54:43 pm »
Also where does the phrase "one of each" die out. In Yorkshire it means one portion of fish and chips (so you might order four of each for a family of four and so on).

As soon as you leave Yorkshire, I'm afraid....
I feel like Captain Kirk, on a brand new planet every day, a little like King Kong on top of the Empire State

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #54 on: September 16, 2008, 02:02:32 pm »
I haven't had lunch yet and this is making me hungry!

Chips, savaloy, curry sauce and a pickled egg should sort me out!
Those wonderful norks are never far from my thoughts, oh yeah!

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #55 on: September 16, 2008, 02:07:10 pm »
What's a savaloy ?
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Eccentrica Gallumbits

  • Rock 'n' roll and brew, rock 'n' roll and brew...
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #56 on: September 16, 2008, 03:32:45 pm »

Also where does the phrase "one of each" die out. In Yorkshire it means one portion of fish and chips (so you might order four of each for a family of four and so on). When I tried it down south they thought I meant one of everything they did and gave me a very strange look.

When/where I lived in Yorkshire people ordered by "fish and chips once" or "fish and chips twice" or "fish and chips three times and a portion of chips" and so on.

Tiermat - it's definitely a teacake in Huddersfield and Brighouse. Plain teacakes, fruit teacakes, toasted teacakes - mmmm.
My feminist marxist dialectic brings all the boys to the yard.


clarion

  • Tyke
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #57 on: September 16, 2008, 03:35:22 pm »
'Once' or 'twice' would be an order in Skipton.  In Sheffield, you're more likely to ask for a 'fish supper'.
Getting there...

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #58 on: September 16, 2008, 03:36:50 pm »
I was in a chip chop the other day and some English people (presumably not from Sheffield) were getting very confused by the single fish/ fish supper choice.

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #59 on: September 16, 2008, 03:37:08 pm »
Here it's "one of each twice and a a portion of mushy peas" or similar. That would get you haddock by the way as that's the default fish. You would have to specify if you wanted cod.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Eccentrica Gallumbits

  • Rock 'n' roll and brew, rock 'n' roll and brew...
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #60 on: September 16, 2008, 04:37:12 pm »
'Once' or 'twice' would be an order in Skipton.  In Sheffield, you're more likely to ask for a 'fish supper'.

In Edinburgh an anything supper will be the thing and chips. Haggis supper, pizza supper, fish supper, white pudding supper. The pizzas are folded over and deep-fried, though - not for the unsuspecting!
My feminist marxist dialectic brings all the boys to the yard.


Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #61 on: September 16, 2008, 05:16:04 pm »
Now a balm, that was a thing of true confusion for me.

Do you mean barm ?
If so, that's one thing.
A tea-cake is another (no currants in this version)
Or a muffin ? (not blackberry, oatmeal, lemon drizzle etc).

IMHO they're all the bloody same but the name changes wherever you are in Lancashire.
Don't get me started on stotties. Must grumble.

I don't have gravy on my chips.
It has to be either Hollands meat pie and chips (I worked at Hollands during the summer holidays when I was at college- lovely when they were fresh out of the oven but the stories I could tell............) or fish, chips and mushy peas.
I don't know where the best chippy in the world is*. The search continues. Someone has to do it.

*It's not Harry Ramsdens.




Well, when I was in manchester it was a bread roll.  It confused me no end as when I bought chips I was always ask if I wanted a balm.  Then after a couple of months there one of the counter ladies told me it was a buttered bread roll.

It's a barm (or barm cake if you're in Bolton).
It's a kind of bread roll (as are all the others I've mentioned above) but no-one calls them that up here.
A bread roll is what you have with soup  ::-)






It is NOT a cake.  Did marrie antoniette say let them eat cake?  She said it cos they had no bread.  It is not cake.  I am an authority on cake, apart from desicated coconut as its the work of the devil.

tiermat

  • According to Jane, I'm a Unisex SpaceAdmin
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #62 on: September 16, 2008, 05:16:45 pm »
Lynx, you are Ralf Little AICMFP
I feel like Captain Kirk, on a brand new planet every day, a little like King Kong on top of the Empire State

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #63 on: September 16, 2008, 05:17:05 pm »
barm; bap; cob; breadcake; teacake; muffin; etc

See earlier cake comment.

Eccentrica Gallumbits

  • Rock 'n' roll and brew, rock 'n' roll and brew...
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #64 on: September 16, 2008, 05:30:05 pm »
I was going to do a post about names, descriptions, cakes of soap, Fairy Liquid and all sorts of dead intellectual stuff, but I just don't care enough.

Teacakes are bread rolls. It does not matter that the word cake appears in the name, they are still teacakes.
My feminist marxist dialectic brings all the boys to the yard.


blackpuddinonnabike

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #65 on: September 16, 2008, 05:31:32 pm »
Stottie Cakes!

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #66 on: September 16, 2008, 05:37:04 pm »
barm; bap; cob; breadcake; teacake; muffin; etc

See earlier cake comment.

Read my original post properly- I said they're called cakes but they're not remotely cake- like.

Clarion is adding more confusion information to the debate.

To sum up- NOT CAKE BUT CALLED CAKE.


Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #67 on: September 16, 2008, 05:40:56 pm »
barm; bap; cob; breadcake; teacake; muffin; etc

See earlier cake comment.

Read my original post properly- I said they're called cakes but they're not remotely cake- like.

Clarion is adding more confusion information to the debate.

To sum up- NOT CAKE BUT CALLED CAKE.



Great so it lies about being cake as well.

I'm off to have a quick victoria sponge cake to recover.

Really Ancien

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #68 on: September 16, 2008, 05:53:41 pm »
Teacake.
In Great Britain, a teacake is usually a light, sweet, yeast-based bun containing dried fruits such as currants, sultanas or peel. It is typically split, toasted, buttered, and served with tea. It is flat and circular, with a smooth brown upper surface and a somewhat lighter underside. In certain areas of Barnsley, West Yorkshire, Lancashire and Cumbria, teacake recipes omit currants and sultanas. In Kent the tea cake is known as a "huffkin", which is often flavoured with hops, especially at the time of harvesting hops in September. In Sussex a luxurious version of the tea cake with added aromatics such as nutmeg, cinamon and rose water is still sometimes made and called a manchet or Lady Arundel's Manchet. In West Cumbria, some East Lancashire towns and parts of nearby West Yorkshire, a teacake is the name given to a plain bread roll. In this area, the normal "teacake" is referred to as a currant or fruited teacake.

Tunnocks Teacake
The Tunnock's Tea Cake is a sweet food popular in Great Britain. They are often served with a cup of tea or coffee.

The product consists of a small round shortbread biscuit covered with a dome of a whipped egg white concoction similar to marshmallow. This is then encased in a thin layer of milk or plain chocolate and wrapped in a distinctive red and silver foil paper for the more popular milk chocolate variety, with blue and gold wrapping for the plain.

The name tea cake is somewhat confusing as generally a teacake is taken to mean a sweet bread roll with dried fruit added to the mix, which is usually served toasted and buttered. A Tunnock's Tea Cake bears no relation to this product.

Products similar to the Tunnock's Teacake include the "Mallowpuff" (sold in New Zealand by Griffins Foods Ltd), the Israeli winter confectionary krembo, the Whippet cookie and Viva Puff in Canada the Negerkuss in Germany (more politically correct: "Schaumkuss") and mallomars in the United States.

Still no nearer to finding the great gravy divide, do they have gravy in Leicester, for those Pukka Pies?


Damon.

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #69 on: September 16, 2008, 07:44:00 pm »
Macclesfield in Cheshire is known for chips with gravy.

That'll be the Macc Lads influence then..

Beer'n'Chips'n'Sex'n'Gravy

S'all a Macc Lad wants.... ;D

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #70 on: September 16, 2008, 07:47:40 pm »
Best chip shop in the UK ? A toss up between the Magpie in Whitby and one in a little stall on Bridlington harbour.
Also where does the phrase "one of each" die out. In Yorkshire it means one portion of fish and chips (so you might order four of each for a family of four and so on). When I tried it down south they thought I meant one of everything they did and gave me a very strange look.

Never heard of it.  It's a fish supper round Darlington.

The Magpie's great - but the queue's usually enough to discourage a hungry cyclist.

Valiant

  • aka Sam
    • Radiance Audio
Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #71 on: September 16, 2008, 08:28:30 pm »
My local chippy does nice gravy and chilli sauce and the fish is fresh from the market. Yummy.

Whenever I get chips, I ask for a buttered bun on the bottom, chips finished off with gravy over one half and then topped with curry sauce.
You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say will be misquoted, then used against you.

Support Equilibrium

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #72 on: September 16, 2008, 08:29:30 pm »
What's a savaloy ?

Funny you should mention that (although I'm certain you know exactly what one is!) A housemate from Macc  (as it happens) came to London and said "What the FOOOOOOOOK is a Savaloy?"

I laughed quite a fair bit  :)
Those wonderful norks are never far from my thoughts, oh yeah!

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #73 on: September 16, 2008, 09:54:50 pm »
Teacake.
, some East Lancashire towns  a teacake is the name given to a plain bread roll. In this area, the normal "teacake" is referred to as a currant or fruited teacake.


Damon.

I'm from East Lancashire.
I still get confused when I go elsewhere. I thought I had it nailed (see earlier posts) but I see that I was mistaken  :-\
Chip barm will do nicely though  :thumbsup:



LEE

Re: The great chip shop gravy divide.
« Reply #74 on: September 16, 2008, 10:00:27 pm »
Gravy up north, my arse!  All you buggers can afford is a bag of scraps with a spoonfull of pea-wet on it   ;D ;D

(pea-wet, for the uninitiated is the liquid from mushy peas)

is that the same as Liquor as served with pie and mash in the East End? (I stuck to kebabs and Chinese take away when I lived there)

Its only flour, water and parsley.

Pie and mash is tops :thumbsup:

Londoners have you chaps tried Olleys in Herne Hill?  Allegedly top 5 chippy in the country.

In total there are around 2000 top 5 chippys in the country