Author Topic: High heart rate at maximum exertion  (Read 3122 times)

Re: High heart rate at maximum exertion
« Reply #25 on: August 01, 2014, 01:20:23 pm »
A workout at 130bpm and they are saying take it easy?

That's about what my HR was while riding up the Hardknott Pass (33% gradient) on the Swan with Two Necks 600 earlier this year.
My maximum is somewhere around 180 as a reasonable guess. Last time I did a ramp test was 1991 and I got 192 IIRC So 130bpm isn't even a high intensity workout even for me, it's probably moderate walking pace for you.

I don't think obsessing about heart rates is very useful for healthy people most of the time.
Wear a monitor so you know what rates you have for rest, gentle pootling, hill-climbing and flat-out riding.

Assess how these feel and their associated heart rates.
Then leave your monitor in a drawer.

Enjoy your cycling!

I've taken to using a HRM for rides. I use it to tell me when I'm going at over 65% MHR, which when I first went for a ride, came surprisingly quickly and easily while riding up an easy hill.
Given that I'm relatively unfit this year, I've been pleased with how relatively well preserved I've felt after some pretty hard rides and not felt as trashed the morning after as I think I would have been.


Just turned on my garmin- my average heartrate for 21 minutes last night was 212. (max 221)
A crafty midnight 10 mile TT?

Re: High heart rate at maximum exertion
« Reply #26 on: August 01, 2014, 01:36:21 pm »
I'm no athlete - I have the VO2Max of an unhealthy slug.

130 is definitely a good workout for me, probably about right for 21-22mph. On the flat I'd expect to be able to sustain that for an hour (see first sentence).

I think the physios had a low benchmark. Most of the people in the class were pretty unfit.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: High heart rate at maximum exertion
« Reply #27 on: August 01, 2014, 01:37:07 pm »
Not at midnight and not crafty ;)

I would also never put my HRM in a drawer, use it religiously for training (along with a power meter)  Sometimes its very easy to go a bit too hard on the easy sessions without realising if you have no numbers, and then you wonder why you can't hit the numbers on the hard sessions.

Also, with the hard sessions/racing, I find that using it, although it might feel like near death, the HRM actually says its not quite death so push harder! ;)

Re: High heart rate at maximum exertion
« Reply #28 on: August 01, 2014, 02:46:32 pm »
Sometimes its very easy to go a bit too hard on the easy sessions without realising if you have no numbers, and then you wonder why you can't hit the numbers on the hard sessions.


Sure is easy to overcook it, unless you're knackered.
We seem a lot more savvy about training than when I was a young lad racing on the local velodrome in the late 1980s. I was bought up the old school way for club 10s, that you just went as hard as you can. It worked well enough on the velodrome when races for a juvenile were never more than a mile and there were a few tactics going on to save yourself for the sprint finish. But for club 10s, I think that I started off too hard. The coach at the velodrome never talked about HR or effort, except that you just rode as hard as you could.
Track racing did get my speed up a bit, but never made much difference to my 10 mile times.
Going back to a few club 10s a few years ago with the same mentality and not using a HRM, I'm sure that I went straight into 95% MHR + for the first half a mile (I remember doing 25mph uphill from the start and not going any faster when it go flat, but being out of breath) then tried to recover, then going back up to 95% and so on. I did wonder why the fast lads didn't seem out of breath while I was gasping but put that down to not being used to short events.

Pacing myself never really occured to me for a 10. ??? :D
Suppose I ought to try a club 10 this year with my HRM. I doubt I'd be much slower than a few years ago, unless I ride it backwards! :D

Re: High heart rate at maximum exertion
« Reply #29 on: August 01, 2014, 07:08:23 pm »
Old school mentality still exists around the 10 mile TT and that you should just ride them as hard as you can, but I ride to heart rate and every week I see if I can go up another beat and sustain it. My max HR is 191, so I find riding at 178 is the way I can maintain the fastest speed.

mattc

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Re: High heart rate at maximum exertion
« Reply #30 on: August 01, 2014, 07:54:07 pm »
Shirley you DO ride them as hard as you can. But that's over the whole 10 miles - starting fast then blowing up is just not a good way to PB!

Riding at the hardest _sustainable_ effort is the key. You can do this by feel, but HR makes it easier to get right. For most riders, anyway.
Has never ridden RAAM
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Re: High heart rate at maximum exertion
« Reply #31 on: November 22, 2017, 09:08:04 am »
I would sustain 176 for around 20 minutes during my (flat out) fast commutes fairly comfortably.

an old thread, but I just stumbled accross it

On Sunday, I rode a 50km Sportive and this is the 1st time that I have gone as fast as I can for the entire distance of 50km

I'm 57, and my max heart rate (according to my Garmin, and before Sunday), was 177....

On Sunday, my max heartrate went up 2 beats to 179. On the ride, which lasted 1 hr 45 min,  I rode 84% of the time in Zone 4, and 9% of the time in Zone 5. I was pretty knackered at the end.:

https://www.strava.com/activities/1281665044/overview

I've been taking it easy since Monday, but how long should I wait before having a hard ride again?
“No great mind has ever existed without a touch of madness.” - Aristotle

Re: High heart rate at maximum exertion
« Reply #32 on: November 22, 2017, 10:18:30 am »
How long was the total ride?  I see that you did it in 1:44.

I would think you would be OK tonight.

Re: High heart rate at maximum exertion
« Reply #33 on: January 05, 2018, 09:26:42 am »
My New Years Day 5k parkrun. https://www.strava.com/activities/1335688336

29 flippin minutes, walking up hills, utterly shagged and an ave of 189bpm with a max of 221. EEEK. Something not quite right here. I'm 52 years old but my 'normal' max is 198ish, and I usually aim for 24 mins at around 177 beats (my lactate threshold). I was sweating so there's nothing up with the chest-strap contact. I've had similar bonkers readings running and cycling in the two weeks preceding, which i put down to the cold weather snap.

I've got a dust mite poo allergy and having used up my nasal spray which kept the worst of the symptoms at bay, I started on the generic anti-histamine pills you get from the supermarket as a stop-gap. I'm pretty sure this is the reason for the 'jump' in my HR (I'll have a stab and go for Supra Ventricular Tachycardia (expialidocious!)), and I stopped taking them 3 days ago.

Beware! It looks like anti-histamines can magically up your heart rate folks. To maximum.... And beyond!!

Maybe I'm being oversensitive but my chest still doesn't feel right (could be the allergy though - I'm now slightly wheezy), and I'm a tad concerned I've damaged something cardio-wise. Is it worth bothering/pushing my GP for an exercise ECG, or will i just be thought of as one of the 'worried well'? (Or then again I could get a script for some salbutamol á la Chris Froome and smash my pb - or die tryin'.)




'Something....something.... Something about racing bicycles, but really a profound metaphor about life itself.'  Tim Krabbé. Possibly

Re: High heart rate at maximum exertion
« Reply #34 on: January 05, 2018, 09:59:44 am »
You might have a virus
<i>Marmite slave</i>

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Re: High heart rate at maximum exertion
« Reply #35 on: January 05, 2018, 10:09:49 am »
Re chest pains after high heart-rate exercise: I get them all the time. Doc opines that they are just internal* inflammation caused by the heart pummelling at the inside of the ribcage.  Mine usually get worse if I lie down, especially on my left side.  I can also get them at the beginning of a ride if I haven't fully recovered from the previous one: they go away, sometimes with a sort-of unsticking sensation.

And having experienced both, I can tell you that angor - extreme angina/heart attack - feels quite different.

*just as well, that
I dare eat all that may become a man.

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Re: High heart rate at maximum exertion
« Reply #36 on: January 05, 2018, 10:30:46 am »
You might have a virus

Possibly, although I don't feel remotely cold or flu-ey.

Re chest pains after high heart-rate exercise: I get them all the time. Doc opines that they are just internal* inflammation caused by the heart pummelling at the inside of the ribcage. 

That's a point. ISTR you can get a soreness in the ribcage too due the intercostals working harder under exertion. Or something. Anyway, my allergy spray from Corticosteroids-R-Us has just popped throught the letterbox, so I'm sneeze and wheeze free again. Might pop out for a short, light jog and see how things go.
'Something....something.... Something about racing bicycles, but really a profound metaphor about life itself.'  Tim Krabbé. Possibly

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: High heart rate at maximum exertion
« Reply #37 on: January 06, 2018, 12:05:27 pm »
Beware! It looks like anti-histamines can magically up your heart rate folks. To maximum.... And beyond!!

Sounds plausible - ISTR reading something about pseudoephedrine and caffeine reacting together to raise heart rate to dangerously high levels, so if your antihistamine contained pseudoephedrine and you washed it down with a mug of coffee...

Don't take my word for this though - I may not have remembered the details correctly. But it could be worth checking.

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: High heart rate at maximum exertion
« Reply #38 on: January 06, 2018, 01:01:02 pm »
Riding at the hardest _sustainable_ effort is the key. You can do this by feel, but HR makes it easier to get right. For most riders, anyway.

Yes - HR isn't always a reliable measure, but if you know what you're capable of, it can help you to keep pushing yourself harder. You might feel like you're pushing hard already, but then you look at your heart rate and see you're only in the 'tempo' zone, when you should be in the 'threshold' zone. Then it's a case of applying a bit of Rule 5 to get yourself where you need to be...

Take my recent parkrun performances, for example. For the last few weeks I've felt like I've been running quite hard but have come away with relatively poor times and looking at the stats, this has been matched with a correspondingly low average HR. Today, I followed the pacer for a faster time and managed to persuade myself to keep going even when it started hurting - and my average HR was much closer to what I know from experience to be my limit. So I reckon I can justifiably feel pleased with my effort, even though I was still a lot slower than my PB (set in 2014 when I was much fitter and about 13kg lighter).

Re: High heart rate at maximum exertion
« Reply #39 on: January 08, 2018, 02:05:47 am »
Sounds plausible - ISTR reading something about pseudoephedrine and caffeine reacting together to raise heart rate to dangerously high levels, so if your antihistamine contained pseudoephedrine and you washed it down with a mug of coffee...

They were Loratidine and Cetirizine salts. One's meant to be less drowsy-inducing than t'other, but i can't tell the difference. Neither have  pseudoeph listed as an ingredient. (Some of the previous generation of antihistamines might do though because they have a secondary use as sleeping aids. Nytol etc.) What these things do have though are cholinergic effects, which I understand to mean that they interfere with the neurotransmitter/signals which tell the heart to slow down when it's beating fast. I've taken cold remedies with coffee before but never had such a high beating heart. Anyway, I'm off them now and things have gone back to (what for me is) normal.

Yes - HR isn't always a reliable measure, but if you know what you're capable of, it can help you to keep pushing yourself harder. You might feel like you're pushing hard already, but then you look at your heart rate and see you're only in the 'tempo' zone, when you should be in the 'threshold' zone. Then it's a case of applying a bit of Rule 5 to get yourself where you need to be...

I'm the opposite! I think I'm just cruising along, maybe upper zone 2/zone 3 on perceived exertion, and then i look at my hr and it'll be doing high 170s - even without the drugs. (On the antihistamines it was hitting 200 plus for that level of effort) I've always had to try to rein things in.
'Something....something.... Something about racing bicycles, but really a profound metaphor about life itself.'  Tim Krabbé. Possibly