Author Topic: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2  (Read 6960 times)

Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« on: August 17, 2014, 11:05:42 pm »
This is quite a long review of the Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2. Manufacturers website with pictures and stats here: https://www.bigagnes.com/Products/Detail/Tent/SeedhouseSL2

I was on the hunt for a tent that would suit me for solo cycle camping earlier this year. I was looking for something to fill the gap between my Quechua T2 Ultralight, which is a great tent but bigger and heavier than I want for solo touring, and my Gelert Solo, which packs down to nothing but is a bit too small for comfort, and a bit dodgy in terms of build quality. Since I was on my way to the States for a tour, I extended my search to the American brands you can't find over here, and eventually settled on the Seedhouse SL2 (2013 model) on the strength of some very positive reviews.

Pitching
I was a little apprehensive as I hadn't had a chance to try putting it up in the garden before setting off, but in the event I needn't have worried. It's similar to most modern tents – you assemble the poles and then clip them into the inner before stretching the outer over the whole and pegging it out.

The difference here is that the poles are all strung together on the same piece of elastic. This isn't as gimicky as it sounds; not only do you not need to worry about which pole is which, it also allows for the slightly odd shape you can see in the pictures (more on this later). I've pitched it a few times by the light of a headtorch and very much appreciated this feature.

It comes with the usual bare minimum of pegs, but they are good quality solid aluminium ones which are nice to use. I did manage to shatter one trying to push it through a tree root, but the rest are still good. There are not enough included to use all the guy lines out of the box, but in practice I wouldn't use all five unless it was very windy – just the two at the front to keep the entrance in shape.

It's worth noting that it's freestanding, so you can pitch it on beaches and on hard standing. You can also use it without the outer in very warm conditions, at the cost of a little privacy. Big Agnes also advertise a 'fast fly' mode – you buy a footprint and then use only that and the fly. I shan't be doing this as I am cursed with delicious blood and attract biting things from miles around, but it does save you a few ounces. 

Here it is with a Terra Nova Voyager for comparison:


In use
I've been hugely impressed by the comfort and quality of the tent. It's beautifully put together and the materials are really top-notch. I left it pitched for four days in the same spot and the outer didn't sag at all. There are some nice little touches, like pockets right by the door so you can retrieve things  from outside, reflective guy lines, and extra velcro on the door to stop you getting sprayed with dew first thing on the morning.

Although the 2 in the SL2 model number suggests it's a two-person tent, it wouldn't be practical for two people to spend much time in this tent – it's barely wide enough to fit two narrow mats, so two actual adults would be constantly knocking elbows. It might be OK to share with a kid, but essentially it's a solo tent. I can't be too down on Big Agnes for this as it's industry standard to oversell like this.

However, for one person it's excellently roomy. One of the features that made me buy it was the high arch which provides extra head room. I'm 6', which isn't unusually tall, but I do struggle to find a tent in which I can sit up to drink water or kneel up to blow up an airbed. It's also wide enough for me to sleep without my toes touching the end, and someone taller than me could sleep diagonally across it for another few inches of room.

Pretty comfy:


Ventilation is also worth mentioning. I sleep hot and often wake up to a lot of condensation on the fly, but even in very warm weather I've had no problems with the Seedhouse. The fly sits off the ground – if you lie on your front you can see out under the edge of the fly – and this plus the high roof means plenty of airflow.

The vestibule isn't the biggest, but has room for my big old Arkell panniers to stand up in without getting in my way. The front of the tent is at quite an angle, so opening the door first thing in the morning is a bit of a trick – you have to unzip it (there's a velcro tab on the bottom which keeps it in the closed position) and then throw it open to prevent the dew from coming in, but this is a fairly common problem. There isn't room to cook or to sit in the vestibule as in some larger tents, it's very much a storage area.

One unknown so far is how well it performs in persistent wet weather. I've had a couple of heavy showers on it and experienced no leaks, but it does lack a bathtub-style groundsheet so I would be cautious of using it on sodden ground or where the site might flood. That said, I would trust it to stay dry through heavy and prolonged rain. There are pictures on the internet of people camped in fairly deep snow with theirs and apparently still having fun. They are Canadian though, so YMMV.
 
On the bike
The one major downside I've found with the Seedhouse is that the poles don't fold down enough for it to fit in my panniers. However, the rest of the tent can be folded down more, so you can just leave the poles on the outside and pack everything else up. As the whole package is quite narrow, I simply strap it to the rack between my panniers, as you can see here:


If I was expecting it to rain heavily whilst I was riding, I'd pack the whole into something waterproof, but as I've mostly used it this summer I haven't yet needed to do so.

Overall
I couldn't really be happier with the Seedhouse. It's pretty much my ideal bike camping tent, and the more I use it the more confident I am in its capabilities. The build quality is particularly reassuring – you might think a tent as light as this one would be flimsy and not last long, but I'm pretty sure that Big Agnes and I will be keeping one another company on tour for a good few years to come.

Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2014, 05:12:16 pm »
brilliant review thanks for sharing well worth the read.i love your overall set up .i bought a thorn audax and intend to use just rear panniers and barbag.most of my gear is lightweight thanks to bikepacker for his great advice on that,so now the tent mine is great but at 4 kg way to eavy so i might ask my buddy in america to keep an eye on the sales and see if i can pick up a  seedhouse 2 for a good price.
thanks again for the great review happy travels and camping.

anto. :thumbsup:

Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2014, 11:32:33 am »
I arrived at the Seedhouse SL2 after deciding I wanted a more lightweight tent than my Tempest 200 (old model with the pointy porch) and trying and ruling out CrinklyLion's Laser Comp (and by extension the Akto - I just didn't get on with that entrance style).

I'd briefly seen Phil's Big Agnes in action at Didcot and idly gave it a quick Google. Again, I was impressed with the very positive reviews I found online. And, well, who doesn't want to be able to say they've got a Big Agnes?

After quizzing Phil and also being impressed with the rest of BA's offerings, I thought "sod it!" and took the plunge without really having given one a close-up inspection. Although there are a few UK suppliers of Big Agnes tents, I couldn't find someone doing the Seedhouse SL2, so I eventually bought from America. http://www.backcountry.com had a sale on, which offset the import fees somewhat (about £120 iirc). Postage cost a bit too, but I had my new tent 4 days later  :thumbsup:

I've only spent a few nights in it so far, so it's a bit too soon to add much of a review, but I can add a few more photos. None with amazing Californian coastlines, but I'll try and rectify that at some point in the future  ;D



First impressions: it really does feel very spacious inside! Part of this is probably the optical effect of being able to see through to the outer skin, but it's really not too shabby at all in terms of actual room inside the main compartment. The photo above shows a 20" x 66" sleeping mat pushed up to the side wall and the far end of the tent (spork for scale). Alongside are a Topeak bar bag, a front roller and a couple of Red Cycling Products WP100 back-roller-a-likes. Plenty big enough for me and my not-particularly-minimal stuff, anyway. Excellently roomy indeed.

I like it a lot!  :thumbsup:

I've got the 2014 model and the poles fold down short enough to fit comfortably into one of my rear panniers. I tend to split the rest of the tent (I bought a footprint too, so I've options for pitching outer-first in Welsh Weather) into different dry bags etc and it doesn't take up much space at all. (Probably comparable in pack size to the Laser Comp 1 I tried, and half the weight of my Tempest 200.)



The porch is going to take me a while to get used to, I think. As Phil says it's got a shallow slope to it, so it's a bit of a reach for me as a short arse to get to the zip at the bottom without pressing my face up against the fly! There's enough space to store a few bits in it though (That's a front roller under the skid lid), and rather conveniently the groundsheet from my Tempest fits quite nicely (I just tuck the extra pointy bit underneath).

Also with half a mind on Welsh Weather, I had a bit of a play with pegging the porch in a few different ways and I reckon there might just be a few options for unclipping the front bit of the inner tent so you can push it back and keep it dry whilst you bring the porch fabric across to keep you dry(er) whilst you huddle at a stove next to the tent.

I have sometimes unclipped the first bit of the inner so I can lie down in the porch of an evening but to be honest, with the mesh inner, you can just lie on your bed with the outer door open and the inner door zipped and still get pretty much the same effect ...but with extra bedding!

I too am cursed with delicious blood, so I'm strict about not leaving the inner door open. The free-standing design does make it easy to just pick the whole tent up before you pack it away and shake out any intruders.

Ordinarily, my pegging/guy default seems to be a peg at each corner of the base, the two pegs at the front for the porch, one either side pulling out the upper and lower guys to give you the full shape inside, and one at the foot to keep the fly off the inner. No need to use any of the other guys unless it's windy. I have fitted Mini Line-Lok cleats to all the guys though, as I couldn't get on with the things that came with the tent.

Pitching's dead simple with the Jake's foot system. Will be interesting to see how that holds together in stronger winds!


The build quality is particularly reassuring – you might think a tent as light as this one would be flimsy and not last long, but I'm pretty sure that Big Agnes and I will be keeping one another company on tour for a good few years to come.

+1



Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2014, 12:55:50 pm »
Nikki what make is the mat I dont recognise it?
Get a bicycle. You will never regret it, if you live- Mark Twain

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2014, 02:44:49 pm »
...ruling out CrinklyLion's Laser Comp (and by extension the Akto - I just didn't get on with that entrance style).

Yeah, the Akto-style entrance brilliant for sitting in the tent and cooking (iff the wind hasn't changed since you pitched the tent).  But very much not brilliant when you come back utterly soaked and want to strip off without getting all your stuff wet.  I reckon this tunnel-style porch is much more practical for that sort of thing, especially if there are cunning options for partially unclipping the inner and shoving all your dry stuff to the back.


Quote
I too am cursed with delicious blood, so I'm strict about not leaving the inner door open.

It's not just about the biting beasties.  I'm sure I've warned you about chaffinches...   :hand:


Quote
The free-standing design does make it easy to just pick the whole tent up before you pack it away and shake out any intruders.

Which reminds me of a conversation I had with Arabella...

For the benefit of anyone else who this hasn't occurred to: when packing up a small tent, you can unclip the inner, turn it inside out and shake it to remove 99% of the grass, grit, earwigs and so on.  Much more effective than brushing it out, and doesn't require a hoover.

(Also works with large tents, but you need more than one pair of hands, and probably won't be able to keep it from touching the ground.)

Obviously a free-standing design has the additional advantage that you can pick it up, shake it, and then plonk it in the sunshine to dry.


Quote
Pitching's dead simple with the Jake's foot system. Will be interesting to see how that holds together in stronger winds!

Ooh, I like.   :thumbsup:


(I also like 'Big Agnes'.  Has a nice Amiga-y ring to it...)
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2014, 03:11:40 pm »
(I also like 'Big Agnes'.  Has a nice Amiga-y ring to it...)

Apparently it's a mountain. You know the one; next to Little Agnes...

I also respect this naming system  ;D


Nikki what make is the mat I dont recognise it?

It's another Big Agnes product: the Q-Core SL.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2014, 03:21:33 pm »
Nikki what make is the mat I dont recognise it?

It's another Big Agnes product: the Q-Core SL.

Interesting.  What's it like?  Does it squeak?  How do you inflate it (I'm guessing the reference to anti-microbial fill implies lungs)?

(Silly Americans and their firkin-furlong-fortnight-farenheit units.)
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2014, 03:31:53 pm »
You can do lungs or it works with a schnozzle-a-like bag they call The Pumphouse.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U85aawUjdaU

I've no experience of Downmats et al to compare with those, but it's insulating and comfy even with Arse and Hips.

Not squeaky of itself, but doesn't play quietly with the Seedhouse's groundsheet. Cotton appears to be the magic interface (as I understand it is with other squeaky mats). I'll do a proper review after a) a few more sleeps and b) I've finished molishing a cotton opposite-of-liner for it.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2014, 03:44:39 pm »
Seems to get good reviews from people with beards:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KB3LCxNpyPg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QsXuft9qZBo


Pumphouse looks significantly slower than a Schnozzel, presumably because of the type of valve it's designed to work with.  OTOH, should work with pretty much any valve of that type.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2014, 07:31:06 pm »
Here are the Jake's foots Jake's feets attachments as found on both the (2014) footprint and tent inner:



There's a ball-head on the end of the poles that snaps into the recess you can see in the left-hand one, then the outer has a hook that clips over the bar at the end.

Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #10 on: September 14, 2014, 08:59:34 pm »
Seems to get good reviews from people with beards:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KB3LCxNpyPg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QsXuft9qZBo


Pumphouse looks significantly slower than a Schnozzel, presumably because of the type of valve it's designed to work with.  OTOH, should work with pretty much any valve of that type.
That inflater looks very similar to the earlier down mats which use the stuff sack fairly successfully.
Quote from: Kim
^ This woman knows what she's talking about.

Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #11 on: September 14, 2014, 09:54:01 pm »
Cor that looks comfy. Mmmm.
Get a bicycle. You will never regret it, if you live- Mark Twain

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #12 on: July 08, 2019, 10:26:42 pm »
Five years on, what are people's experiences of the Big Agnes? Having decided it would make sense* to get a one-person tent, I'm finding myself quite tempted by their "bikepacking range": https://www.bigagnes.com/Gear/Tents/Bikepacking for its handy pack size and light weight. At the same time, there are four things that partially put me off:
– The inner going up first then the fly going over the top once it's up. Doesn't seem ideal for pitching in rain.
– The amount of mesh in the inners. Good for ventilation but not so good for windy, rainy, colder British weather.
– The less than stealthy colours, although this does seem to be more inners than flies.
– The prices!

Comments and experiences from Big Agnes users? Impressions and random advices from others?
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #13 on: July 08, 2019, 11:01:25 pm »
– The inner going up first then the fly going over the top once it's up. Doesn't seem ideal for pitching in rain.
 random advices from others?
On random advice, not even advice really, just opinion..
I prefer tents that separate for packing and the inner first pitching ones do that without needing to crawl around attaching/detaching. The pitching in the rain has never been an issue, the amount of water that gets inside is easily wiped up, and the fabric dries really quickly.  For me it's less of an issue than all in one packing where the condensation on the fly gets everywhere.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #14 on: July 08, 2019, 11:10:50 pm »
Random opinions welcome too!
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Karla

  • car(e) free
    • Lost Byway - around the world by bike
Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #15 on: July 08, 2019, 11:16:54 pm »
– The amount of mesh in the inners. Good for ventilation but not so good for windy, rainy, colder British weather.
– The less than stealthy colours, although this does seem to be more inners than flies.
– The prices!

To the comment about the amount of mesh in the inners, add "the height that the flysheet finishes above the ground".  This is quite common in American tents: they are built for long hot summers and are designed to offer insect protection and a bit of privacy; anyone foolish enough to camp in winter will have a specialist tent. 

I did the first half of my trip with an old Laser but ditched it at the end of Japan in favour of an MSR Hubba NX.  This has the high flysheet and mesh problems, and makes the tent noticeably cooler - If I'd have known beforehand I'd probably have bought a different tent, or else a thicker sleeping bag.  I wouldn't really recommend them for British conditions, but they're good tents if the cold doesn't bother you and are cheaper than the Big Agnes range. 

Tents you should consider:
The Terra Nova Laser you posted in Cotswold for £360 as that's a good price - though it's a shame they don't have double doors like they used to as that was good for ventilation.
The Macpac Sololite - I believe ChrisN OTP has one and speaks highly of it.
The Tarptent Moment - one of several interesting models they make; basically a Laser with a bit more headroom.  Unfortunately you'll need to do a personal import from America which makes the prices less attractive, unless you know someone who is going over and can be your mule.
The MSR Hubba HP if you can still find one.  Basically it's a Europe-ified version of the Hubba, with less mesh and a better ground seal on the fly.
The Exped Mira 1 - Quite meshy but at least it comes in sombre colours
The Force 10 Helium - A bit heavier, a bit of a lower price point but looks quite good.

Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #16 on: July 08, 2019, 11:41:41 pm »
http://www.trekkertent.com/home/home/32-phreeranger.html


A UK based cottage industry making a clone of the classic Phoenix Phreeranger from modern materials.
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #17 on: July 08, 2019, 11:43:52 pm »
– The inner going up first then the fly going over the top once it's up. Doesn't seem ideal for pitching in rain.
 random advices from others?
On random advice, not even advice really, just opinion..
I prefer tents that separate for packing and the inner first pitching ones do that without needing to crawl around attaching/detaching. The pitching in the rain has never been an issue, the amount of water that gets inside is easily wiped up, and the fabric dries really quickly.  For me it's less of an issue than all in one packing where the condensation on the fly gets everywhere.

That's my experience of inner-first pitching too, although for me the convenience of all-in-one pitching is more useful than the minor inconvenience of crawling inside to attach/detach.  (If it's completely dry (or completely wet) you can always attach/detach with the tent not pitched, which involves less crawling and a lot more spacial awareness.)

In practice, I often find I'm packing away an almost-completely dry inner and a sopping wet outer (thanks Hilleberg), so pitching the outer and footprint as one, giving it half an hour to dry in the lower evening humidity, and then installing the inner works well.


To the comment about the amount of mesh in the inners, add "the height that the flysheet finishes above the ground".  This is quite common in American tents: they are built for long hot summers and are designed to offer insect protection and a bit of privacy; anyone foolish enough to camp in winter will have a specialist tent. 

Seconded.  Wind (and with a particularly poor design, precipitation) getting under the fly is more of a problem warmth-wise than a highly ventilated inner.  My Decathlon hot-weather tent combines an extremely meshy inner with a European-style all-the-way-to-the-ground[1] fly, which seems like a good compromise for stereotypical BRITISH summers.


[1] With cunning slidey rope thingers so it doesn't have to go all the way to the ground.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #18 on: July 09, 2019, 08:43:39 am »
Five years on, what are people's experiences of the Big Agnes? Having decided it would make sense* to get a one-person tent, I'm finding myself quite tempted by their "bikepacking range": https://www.bigagnes.com/Gear/Tents/Bikepacking for its handy pack size and light weight. At the same time, there are four things that partially put me off:
– The inner going up first then the fly going over the top once it's up. Doesn't seem ideal for pitching in rain.
– The amount of mesh in the inners. Good for ventilation but not so good for windy, rainy, colder British weather.
– The less than stealthy colours, although this does seem to be more inners than flies.
– The prices!

Comments and experiences from Big Agnes users? Impressions and random advices from others?

Gosh! Has it really been five years?!

My Seedhouse SL2 has been my go-to tent for that time, but has had a few mods...

Inner first pitch.
In practice, I don't think I've ever had to pitch in anything more than light drizzle. When I first got the tent I did confirm that it is entirely possible to pitch the footprint and outer first and then crawl around a bit and add the inner in afterwards without too much aggro.

Mesh.
After a particularly breezy series of camps, I added a sort of curtain of lightweight inner fabric (from Extremtextil) about a foot and a half high around the inner to keep the wind off me. It buttons in and out as required but adds so little weight/bulk that it tends to just stay in.

Condensation isn't eliminated, but also isn't a huge issue. I have special site selection skills identifying the quick-dry pitch location.



Colours.
Green and slatey here.

Price
It's a solid piece of kit and I don't regret paying for the import fees etc.


I'd seriously consider a Hubba Hubba if I were buying a new tent now but, barring accidents, Agnes isn't likely to need replacing any time soon. The design of the entrance being the main 'fault', but I chuffin' love my tarp extension which works an absolute treat in various ways. (https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=89891.msg2074258#msg2074258). I *think* some of the more recent models have a steeper angle on the entrance section, but I don't know to what extent this improves things.

A friend has recently purchased one of the 1 person backpacking tents. It packs down well into something that hangs easily between the drops. The main issue she's finding is not being able to get a particularly taught pitch, so the outer is too close to (or touching) the inner. I understand she's found quite a lot of other owners saying they have the same problem.





Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #19 on: July 09, 2019, 08:53:21 am »
A friend has recently purchased one of the 1 person backpacking tents. It packs down well into something that hangs easily between the drops. The main issue she's finding is not being able to get a particularly taught pitch, so the outer is too close to (or touching) the inner. I understand she's found quite a lot of other owners saying they have the same problem.
That was mentioned or hinted at in various reviews online, so seems to be a problem with the design.

Interestingly, in the photo your fly seems to come down quite low. Maybe they've altered that since?
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #20 on: July 09, 2019, 08:54:36 am »
– The inner going up first then the fly going over the top once it's up. Doesn't seem ideal for pitching in rain.
 random advices from others?
On random advice, not even advice really, just opinion..
I prefer tents that separate for packing and the inner first pitching ones do that without needing to crawl around attaching/detaching. The pitching in the rain has never been an issue, the amount of water that gets inside is easily wiped up, and the fabric dries really quickly.  For me it's less of an issue than all in one packing where the condensation on the fly gets everywhere.

That's my experience of inner-first pitching too, although for me the convenience of all-in-one pitching is more useful than the minor inconvenience of crawling inside to attach/detach.  (If it's completely dry (or completely wet) you can always attach/detach with the tent not pitched, which involves less crawling and a lot more spacial awareness.)

In practice, I often find I'm packing away an almost-completely dry inner and a sopping wet outer (thanks Hilleberg), so pitching the outer and footprint as one, giving it half an hour to dry in the lower evening humidity, and then installing the inner works well.
I guess free-standing is an advantage in that way too, though I've never had a free-standing tent so am only guessing.
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #21 on: July 09, 2019, 08:55:57 am »
– The amount of mesh in the inners. Good for ventilation but not so good for windy, rainy, colder British weather.
– The less than stealthy colours, although this does seem to be more inners than flies.
– The prices!

To the comment about the amount of mesh in the inners, add "the height that the flysheet finishes above the ground".  This is quite common in American tents: they are built for long hot summers and are designed to offer insect protection and a bit of privacy; anyone foolish enough to camp in winter will have a specialist tent. 

I did the first half of my trip with an old Laser but ditched it at the end of Japan in favour of an MSR Hubba NX.  This has the high flysheet and mesh problems, and makes the tent noticeably cooler - If I'd have known beforehand I'd probably have bought a different tent, or else a thicker sleeping bag.  I wouldn't really recommend them for British conditions, but they're good tents if the cold doesn't bother you and are cheaper than the Big Agnes range. 

Tents you should consider:
The Terra Nova Laser you posted in Cotswold for £360 as that's a good price - though it's a shame they don't have double doors like they used to as that was good for ventilation.
The Macpac Sololite - I believe ChrisN OTP has one and speaks highly of it.
The Tarptent Moment - one of several interesting models they make; basically a Laser with a bit more headroom.  Unfortunately you'll need to do a personal import from America which makes the prices less attractive, unless you know someone who is going over and can be your mule.
The MSR Hubba HP if you can still find one.  Basically it's a Europe-ified version of the Hubba, with less mesh and a better ground seal on the fly.
The Exped Mira 1 - Quite meshy but at least it comes in sombre colours
The Force 10 Helium - A bit heavier, a bit of a lower price point but looks quite good.
Shame that Macpac is yellow. Even if they do call it "citronella"!
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Karla

  • car(e) free
    • Lost Byway - around the world by bike
Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #22 on: July 09, 2019, 09:44:46 am »
http://www.trekkertent.com/home/home/32-phreeranger.html


A UK based cottage industry making a clone of the classic Phoenix Phreeranger from modern materials.

I like the look of the that.  Also the Saor.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #23 on: July 09, 2019, 12:04:46 pm »
I guess free-standing is an advantage in that way too, though I've never had a free-standing tent so am only guessing.

Free-standing is certainly an advantage when you want to pitch in the morning shade so you don't get baked awake at sparrowfart, and can then drag the tent into the sunlight to dry off.

(In practice, I can do this with the Akto, as it only really needs 4 pegs to hold it up.)

Obviously the other advantage is that you can pitch on unpeggable surfaces like concrete, and easily re-locate when you discover the ants' nest.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
« Reply #24 on: July 09, 2019, 03:58:44 pm »
This thread has got me earwormed: https://youtu.be/NAbZzdalZh4
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...