Author Topic: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link  (Read 8922 times)

Andrew

Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #25 on: November 21, 2014, 03:41:20 pm »
I can certainly see that French society is regulated more so than the UK. I find the French to be very conservative, with a love of/for tradition and heritage. Change is slow and requires much discussion.

These things smack you in the face daily in the most mundane of circumstances.

Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #26 on: November 21, 2014, 03:53:36 pm »
I've done PBP four times and been to Semaine Federale since 2008. It seems to me that the respect accorded to those on committees makes these large events possible. But the detailed large scale planning of those events makes them a bit inflexible. Anything that we can do to flow around problems helps.
Nothing is paid for upfront, so the only point of contact we need are the control check ins. But in practical terms there is nowhere else to eat at 4am.

T42

  • Tea tank
Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #27 on: November 21, 2014, 04:32:08 pm »
Learn how to stop your tail light flashing ? I must remember to spend hours practicing this?

It is intensely irritating to other riders and explicitly disallowed in the rules

Some tail lights require a complicated set of button presses to turn off flashing.  This sequence is less than obvious after 30 hours awake, I suppose
It is also contrary to French law. The single file suggestion may relate to the law that forbids cycling two abreast in the dark, but I thought that was the sort of French regulation w that got ignored.
L

Current French law is that you may have a blinking rearlight if you also have one that doesn't blink.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #28 on: November 21, 2014, 04:35:17 pm »
Current French law is that you may have a blinking rearlight if you also have one that doesn't blink.

"Zut alors!"

fboab

  • It's a fecking serious business, riding a bike
Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #29 on: November 21, 2014, 04:44:29 pm »
Current French law is that you may have a blinking rearlight if you also have one that doesn't blink.

I might have to rethink my plans to do the ride. I fecking hate flashing lights with a noisy self righteous passion.

At least I could be right in more than just my own universe when they were still banned.
TSS is not Total Sex Score, Chris!

Andrew

Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #30 on: November 21, 2014, 04:50:40 pm »
Speaking of laws to be obeyed, and introducing THAT subject (you know, the one we've ALL been waiting for) hi-viz vests.

On PBP 2011, I saw, with my very own fatigue-free eyes, riders being pulled over (and maybe even fined) for, as it transpired, not wearing hi-viz. I wasn't wearing mine at the time either, because I didn't want to stop to put it on, but quickly rectified that.

It was still light but fading... dusk as they say I guess.

marcusjb

  • Full of bon courage.
    • Occasional wittering
Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #31 on: November 21, 2014, 04:51:21 pm »
I am rather hoping that ACP keep the rule in place, despite the law.  Made the ride rather more pleasant and the effect of the red ribbon stretching for miles ahead of you on night one would be less if rear lights were flashing.

I only saw a couple of transgressions of it in 2011 (both RUSA riders coincidentally!).

Right! What's next?

Ooooh. That sounds like a daft idea.  I am in!

Cycling Daddy

  • "We shall have an adventure by and by," said Don Q
Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #32 on: November 21, 2014, 06:38:45 pm »
Speaking of laws to be obeyed, and introducing THAT subject (you know, the one we've ALL been waiting for) hi-viz vests.

On PBP 2011, I saw, with my very own fatigue-free eyes, riders being pulled over (and maybe even fined) for, as it transpired, not wearing hi-viz. I wasn't wearing mine at the time either, because I didn't want to stop to put it on, but quickly rectified that.

It was still light but fading... dusk as they say I guess.
Never mind the hi viz I need to know what the rules are for dust caps  ???
Too much sanity may be madness. And maddest of all, to see life as it is and not as it should be.”
― Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quixote

Andrij

  • Андрій
  • Ερασιτεχνικός μισάνθρωπος
Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #33 on: November 21, 2014, 06:44:24 pm »
Discussions like this make me wonder if I can get into shape for PBP next year.  Imagine the potential for befuddlement caused by am American who rides like a Brit.   ;D
;D  Andrij.  I pronounce you Complete and Utter GIT   :thumbsup:

Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #34 on: November 21, 2014, 06:53:51 pm »
Speaking of laws to be obeyed, and introducing THAT subject (you know, the one we've ALL been waiting for) hi-viz vests.

On PBP 2011, I saw, with my very own fatigue-free eyes, riders being pulled over (and maybe even fined) for, as it transpired, not wearing hi-viz. I wasn't wearing mine at the time either, because I didn't want to stop to put it on, but quickly rectified that.

It was still light but fading... dusk as they say I guess.

I was pulled over by one of the chaps on scooters.  It was early in the morning, just before sunrise but quite light, and it had got a bit cold, so I put my see-through race-cape (with reflective strips) on top of my PBP gilet.  No question of a fine, but he politely asked me to rearrange my layers.

Cycling Daddy

  • "We shall have an adventure by and by," said Don Q
Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #35 on: November 23, 2014, 07:28:37 am »
You might want to keep an eye on the website a date change looks possible (+1 day see http://www.audax.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=395.0)
Too much sanity may be madness. And maddest of all, to see life as it is and not as it should be.”
― Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quixote

Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #36 on: November 23, 2014, 10:55:43 am »
after living in the States and doing an SR series there in 2007, I find it hard to sneer at email threads like the Randon group. Admittedly some of the posts are clueless and others are irritating but tucked away in the mob there are voices that remind me of the experienced randonneurs that I was lucky to meet during my time there. The UK and US riders  share more common traits than differences - but for sure the differences can be amusing/irritating.  For a lot of the US riders the trip to France may be their first time abroad - even in a city like NYC, you can't assume that every America has a passport - in fact only a minority have a valid passport. It's just one of those things.  I would like to see an email thread resulting from 500 UK riders having to travel to Louisiana to do a 1200km ride - pretty certain there would be some howlers in the emails which describe the likely misunderstandings....

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #37 on: November 23, 2014, 11:41:09 am »
There are some vastly experienced RUSA folk contributing to that thread, along with several numpties. True about the passport thing - at 2011 Texas Rando Stampede, one of the riders was out of his US state for the first time, let alone owning a passport.

It is just very easy to take the piss when some folk essentially recommend an approach that basically isolates them from the joys of riding PBP as much as is physically possible. If you ignore the controls to save time, sleep in pre-booked rooms, avoid opportunities to socialise with riders from round the world and minimise mixing with the locals just to save time off the bike, why bother going to France? Ride a 1200 in your own country and never get out of your comfort zone. Many RUSA members now avoid riding PBP in favour of their own events and it isn't surprising if your intent is to eliminate any differences from your regular events.

A sub-60 hour PBP finish is admirably quick (and might be worth sacrificing these other aspects for) but everybody gets the same medal. There is no certainty that a rider will be able to come back in 4 years' time to do PBP again and some opportunities will never be repeated, no matter how many times you ride the event.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #38 on: November 23, 2014, 12:47:50 pm »
You might want to keep an eye on the website a date change looks possible (+1 day see http://www.audax.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=395.0)

For those that can't read this it says a final decision will be known in about 10 days.

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #39 on: November 23, 2014, 12:50:14 pm »
Last year one of those scam e-mails saying "Help!  I am stuck in $ABROAD!  Send money!" was doing the rounds, purporting to come from my mate Al.  In Manila.  We were swiftly reassured that he hadn't lost his passport in Manila, as he hadn't got one.

Mind you, he's in the process of acquiring Canadian citizenship so I suppose he'll have to get one soon.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Redlight

  • Enjoying life in the slow lane
Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #40 on: November 23, 2014, 02:41:27 pm »
You might want to keep an eye on the website a date change looks possible (+1 day see http://www.audax.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=395.0)

Hmm. Pigeons... meet the cat  :demon:

Personally, I'd prefer a Monday start and Friday finish as it's simpler from a holiday time booking perspective and you can do it with 5 days off as opposed to 6, but I wouldn't like to be someone who has booked complicated or long distance travel arrangements on the assumption that they would finish sometime on Thursday and travel home the next day.

I imagine there will be a lot of discussion in anticipation of the decision in 10 days' time.  Separate thread, Mr Mod?
Between the Disney abattoir and the chemical refinery

Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #41 on: November 23, 2014, 04:24:06 pm »
You might want to keep an eye on the website a date change looks possible (+1 day see http://www.audax.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=395.0)

Hmm. Pigeons... meet the cat  :demon:

Personally, I'd prefer a Monday start and Friday finish as it's simpler from a holiday time booking perspective and you can do it with 5 days off as opposed to 6, but I wouldn't like to be someone who has booked complicated or long distance travel arrangements on the assumption that they would finish sometime on Thursday and travel home the next day.

I imagine there will be a lot of discussion in anticipation of the decision in 10 days' time.  Separate thread, Mr Mod?

Easy either way, although I had said I'd be home Friday afternoon.   Being well prepared I've already booked my hotels.   Being even better prepared I booked flexible rates.

vorsprung

  • Opposites Attract
    • Audaxing
Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #42 on: November 23, 2014, 07:50:40 pm »
I would like to see an email thread resulting from 500 UK riders having to travel to Louisiana to do a 1200km ride - pretty certain there would be some howlers..

No offence but really, why would I go to the southern United States to ride a bike? 
Audaxing Blog follow @vorsprungbike on

Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #43 on: November 23, 2014, 07:55:43 pm »
I would like to see an email thread resulting from 500 UK riders having to travel to Louisiana to do a 1200km ride - pretty certain there would be some howlers..

No offence but really, why would I go to the southern United States to ride a bike?

For the experience!

Just as well other folk do not take that view with regards to travelling to UK for LEL or even France for PBP.

I quite fancy riding in the USA, Australia, Korea, Japan and a few other places. Just as well folk in UK don't say "why would I go to the South West (or wherever) to ride a bike?"

Cycling Daddy

  • "We shall have an adventure by and by," said Don Q
Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #44 on: November 23, 2014, 08:07:31 pm »
There is a choice Florida ride coming up I think.  Key West to Fort Meyers (sunshine, considerate drivers, plenty of 24 hour food great support...what is not to like??)
L
Too much sanity may be madness. And maddest of all, to see life as it is and not as it should be.”
― Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quixote

Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #45 on: November 23, 2014, 09:25:12 pm »
I would like to see an email thread resulting from 500 UK riders having to travel to Louisiana to do a 1200km ride - pretty certain there would be some howlers..

No offence but really, why would I go to the southern United States to ride a bike?

Some people did for the Natchez Trace 1500.

Quote
There is a magical roadway to the west.  It is a strip of smooth two-lane blacktop 444 miles long.  It is bordered by trees, fields, rivers, streams and many sights of historical significance.  Perhaps its most unique feature is that it is a National Historical Park maintained and operated with Federal funding.  It is the eighth most visited National Park in the country.  Its northern terminus abuts Nashville, Tennessee while the southernmost part is in Natchez, Mississippi.  The main purpose is recreation therefore no commercial vehicles are allowed.  The speed limit is never higher than 50 mph, which discourages vehicles from using it for transportation.  It is a perfect environment for the cyclist.  Neither hilly nor flat, slightly winding, and, impeccably maintained.  The roadway is known as the Natchez Trace Parkway.  Folks residing in the proximity of it refer to it as the "Trace".

http://mellowyellowbent.blogspot.co.uk/2014/10/fix-ing-natchez-trace-1500k.html

Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #46 on: November 24, 2014, 03:49:05 am »
I'm not sure that it is wise to judge national character on the basis of these postings on the Randon list--this was, after all, in response to a call for unusual tips.  I would say that the balance between parochial and cosmopolitan types is about the same in the US as it is in the UK--at least among randoneurs.  And, while  I am a northerner, and would be quite happy for the South to secede and keep their destructive politics to themselves, there are wonderful and interesting places to ride all over the south.  I'm a bit startled by the impulse to write off whole peoples and whole swaths of the earth--especially while pointing to the limited worldview of others.

Bill Watts
Bill Watts

Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #47 on: November 24, 2014, 09:23:32 am »
I'm a bit startled by the impulse to write off whole peoples and whole swaths of the earth--especially while pointing to the limited worldview of others.

Bill Watts

I have no doubt some folk who post on YACF would feel perfectly at home in the 'South' while others would match your 'northern' viewpoint.  Part and parcel of internet forums and soooo easy to post something rather than say the same in a face-to-face manner.  I always take forums with 'a pinch of salt'!

Bairdy

  • Former Pints Champion
Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #48 on: November 24, 2014, 09:39:52 am »
Maybe Vorsprung meant that there's so much great cycling on offer closer to home in Europe.

It's been almost sixteen years since I was in the U.S. I'd like to go back and the south in particular is of interest to me for the music that's come out of there.
It would be great to go to Nashville, Muscle Shoals, Clarksdale but I'd probably want to see it properly at leisure rather than ride through it on a cycling event.
"And I been up to my neck in pleasure
              Up to my neck in pain"

marcusjb

  • Full of bon courage.
    • Occasional wittering
Re: Tips for PBP - Not the usual! -- a link
« Reply #49 on: November 24, 2014, 09:48:27 am »
I would like to see an email thread resulting from 500 UK riders having to travel to Louisiana to do a 1200km ride - pretty certain there would be some howlers..

No offence but really, why would I go to the southern United States to ride a bike?

The food, definitely the food (though I am sure the people, scenery, culture would all be great because it's different and different is interesting and makes life's experiences). 

A long ride fuelled on Creole?  It'd be awesome.
Right! What's next?

Ooooh. That sounds like a daft idea.  I am in!