Author Topic: Sleep  (Read 9444 times)

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Sleep
« Reply #100 on: May 03, 2019, 12:37:43 pm »
I have just phoned the sleep clinic at Basildon hospital. I have requested an appointment as I believe that my weight loss over the past 7 months (a little over 3 stone) means that I no longer suffer from sleep apnoea. Jan has said that she hasn't heard me snore for ages. I haven't fallen asleep in front of my computer for a long time. I even read books without nodding off part way through.

I have been promised a call next week with an appointment.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Sleep
« Reply #101 on: September 08, 2019, 07:11:38 pm »
Well, the appointment in May materialised, but I wasn't discharged. However, a few weeks ago I wrote to the consultant (writing and posting a letter was much quicker than trying to get through on the hospital's not-fit-for-purpose telephone system) and I have now had a letter discharging me from the sleep clinic and asking me to return the machine! Whoop whoop!
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Sleep
« Reply #102 on: September 08, 2019, 07:41:42 pm »
Excellent news!

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: Sleep
« Reply #103 on: September 09, 2019, 08:05:18 am »
I believe that my weight loss over the past 7 months (a little over 3 stone) means that I no longer suffer from sleep apnoea. Jan has said that she hasn't heard me snore for ages.

This is no surprise to me at all. I had exactly the same thing around six years ago, when I lost around 14kg - the snoring stopped completely, I was waking in the morning feeling refreshed and ready to go.

Unfortunately, for various reasons, I've put the weight back on in the last few years and the snoring has become a problem again. I recognise the signs of apnea when I wake up in the morning - it's not just tiredness, it's a foggy feeling in the head, often a headache too. Luckily it's not so bad that I fall asleep during the day. The good thing is that I know the solution, but the bad thing is that the apnea affects your ability to function properly and implement the lifestyle changes required to achieve that solution. A classic vicious circle.

This, I think, is where a CPAP machine can help - when you're getting better sleep, you will feel generally more able to cope with life and will make better decisions relating to your health. I imagine having the machine has played a large part in you losing that three stone.

Glad to hear you're now enjoying good quality, machine-free sleep, that's excellent news.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Sleep
« Reply #104 on: September 09, 2019, 04:57:43 pm »
For the past couple of months I have put the mask on when I get to bed but wake up an hour or two later. I then find I can't get to sleep when wearing the mask, but can without it.

One thing I want to do is institute earlier bed times, but my dear wife often stays up later than I want to. We share a bed and I don't want her coming in a couple of hours int my sleep and gallumphing about. Persuading her to finish her crochet/knitting/spinning/ watching-an-ancient-episode-of-Morse can be quite irksome.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Re: Sleep
« Reply #105 on: October 10, 2019, 06:57:08 am »
If Bouncing The Bed is the issue, consider investing in a Tempur mattress, honestly may be the acquisition you  will ever make, it certainly was chez Ham Hall. Movement does not transfer at all from one side to the other.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Sleep
« Reply #106 on: October 10, 2019, 09:22:12 pm »
We bought a new and very expensive memory foam mattress relatively recently. I don't think we can afford to change again so soon.

To be honest, it's not the gallumphing on the bed which tends to disturb me. It's when she comes into the room. Normally Jan doesn't even turn the light on. But I know she's there.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Sleep
« Reply #107 on: October 11, 2019, 12:14:44 pm »
I have a similar problem.  The bed itself decouples bouncing fairly well, walking into the frame less so.  But before the bed becomes involved my ability to ignore known sounds stops at "what's barakta crashing and banging now?".  Like most deaf people, she's worse if she tries to be quiet.

None of which matters if I'm properly asleep, but if getting a decent night's sleep is important you can guarantee I won't be.

Getting barakta to come to bed early if she's not sleepy is an own goal.  She'll just wriggle or try to read surreptitiously[1] or something.  I tend to request that she either comes to bed at the same time as me, or stays up with a minimum of noise and smells for at least a couple of hours to give me a decent chance to be properly asleep.




[1] The clicking of the page turn button is particularly irritating.  Period of a few seconds, but not consistently so.  It's right up there with ears that click, throb or squelch when you breathe.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...