Author Topic: [HAMR] Visualizing the OYTT  (Read 171420 times)

mattc

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Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #850 on: November 12, 2015, 07:46:00 pm »
Because a 200-mile day is counted in the 195 tally, the 153 mile tally, and the 1mile tally. He "exceeded" 153miles on that day.He also exceeded 195 miles.
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
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red marley

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #851 on: November 12, 2015, 09:05:51 pm »
Here's how their Eddington Numbers have developed over the year


Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #852 on: November 12, 2015, 09:08:40 pm »
That is brilliant, thanks, and shows Steve's "slopey bit" to be while he was recovering from the broken ankle.

HTFB

  • The Monkey and the Plywood Violin (RIP)
Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #853 on: November 12, 2015, 10:46:16 pm »
If you were feeling really kind to the lazy, you could include the Eddington graph for Godwin himself. Kurt has already passed the E-number of Tommy Godwin's Steady Ghost, but is he ahead of Tommy? Eyeballing from the annual progress graph Tommy looks to have been below one Godwin for his first 120-odd and last 40-odd days, so it must be pretty close.

To find Steve's maximum possible Eddington number with 50 days to go, you can rule a line parallel to the diagonal, passing through the 50 mile point on the X axis. It looks to me as though he'll at best be just below 205, while Kurt (with 60 to go) could get to 215 or more---if he can ride 215 miles every day without fail...

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #854 on: November 12, 2015, 11:51:45 pm »
Because a 200-mile day is counted in the 195 tally, the 153 mile tally, and the 1mile tally. He "exceeded" 153miles on that day.He also exceeded 195 miles.

Matt, can you - or anyone else - talk me through this very slowly after the AGM?

:)
You're only as successful as your last 1200...

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #855 on: November 13, 2015, 12:31:24 am »
The vertical axis represents the number of days the rider rode at least the number of miles on the corresponding point on the horizontal axis.

Let's say you rode one day and rode 1 mile. So you have a single point on the graph. The next day you ride 2 miles. So you have 2 days on which you rode at least 1 mile. And one day on which you rode 2 miles.

The graph would be very small and would look like this:


|.
|. .
+--

 So each time you ride a given distance all the points to the left of that on the chart are pushed up by 1. In Jo's elegant representation, the Eddington number is then found at the intersection of the plotted curve and the 45 degree line i.e. y=x. Let's say our rider rides 5 miles the next day.

|.
|. .
|. . . . .
+-------

Now there are one days on which he has done at least 3,4 or 5 miles. Two days on which he has done 2 miles or more. And three days on which he's done 1 mile or more. And the Eddington number is 2 which you can find by tracing the diagonal.

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #856 on: November 13, 2015, 04:13:45 am »
Very nicely put!

red marley

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #857 on: November 13, 2015, 07:24:17 am »
Day 316 / 97: Kurt moves away from the gulf coast heading 206 miles east to Tallahassee at a faster pace than of late. He is currently about 400 miles above the Godwin line. Steve has another day duelling with autumnal winds looping around the wider Cambridge area and back in home for bed after 201 miles. Miles completes his tip from Camperdown out to the west back towards Melbourne for 83 miles at a slower pace than normal.


red marley

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #858 on: November 13, 2015, 08:00:37 am »
If you were feeling really kind to the lazy, you could include the Eddington graph for Godwin himself. Kurt has already passed the E-number of Tommy Godwin's Steady Ghost, but is he ahead of Tommy? Eyeballing from the annual progress graph Tommy looks to have been below one Godwin for his first 120-odd and last 40-odd days, so it must be pretty close.

Here you go...


HTFB

  • The Monkey and the Plywood Violin (RIP)
Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #859 on: November 13, 2015, 08:43:28 am »
Thank you. Well done Kurt, already holder of the all-time* calendar year Eddington record!

Another way to interpret this graph, and particularly the video, is that the area represents total distance travelled so far. The left hand edge rises remorselessly each day through the year till you run out of time; the longer your ride, the more of the whole line you push upwards.


*barring some truly improbable ride patterns from the other contenders in the 30s. They'd have to have been even more consistent than Kurt, except for a hundred days virtually taken off.

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

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Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #860 on: November 13, 2015, 08:57:46 am »
To put these numbers in context I wonder if anyone apart from TG on this forum has a lifetime Eddington number >150 miles
Eddington Numbers 125 (imperial), 168 (metric) 518 (furlongs)  111 (nautical miles)

red marley

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #861 on: November 13, 2015, 09:22:25 am »
I have the data for the other historical challengers and it doesn't look like any of them would come close, but I'll check more thoroughly tonight and possibly graph them all up.

In comparison to chasing the Godwin line, the nice thing about the Eddington number is that once you've got it you can never lose it. If they change they can only ever increase over time.

(I've also updated the vimeo animation above to show Godwin's evolving progress too).

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #862 on: November 13, 2015, 09:52:44 am »
To put these numbers in context I wonder if anyone apart from TG on this forum has a lifetime Eddington number >150 miles

Maybe a few, those who've been audaxing at serious level for at least 25 years.

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #863 on: November 13, 2015, 10:11:47 am »
I think HK might be close to that 200 number. I've almost certainly not ridden enough 300+km days yet. There will be others who have made it but it'll have taken decades.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #864 on: November 13, 2015, 10:16:14 am »
I think HK might be close to that 200 number. I've almost certainly not ridden enough 300+km days yet. There will be others who have made it but it'll have taken decades.

Ian H might be another candidate.
I need a few more years before I hit the 150, 200 is firmly out of reach (at least imperial)

Mr Larrington

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Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #865 on: November 13, 2015, 10:47:26 am »
To put these numbers in context I wonder if anyone apart from TG on this forum has a lifetime Eddington number >150 miles

<Vincent_Price Barry_Clayton>
Woe to you, oh earth and sea
For the Devil sends the Kurt with wrath
Because he knows that time is short
Let him who hath understanding
Reckon the number of the Kurt
For it is an Eddington number
And its number is two hundred and five
Er, two hundred and six
Um, two hundred and seven
Sod this
Anyone fancy a pint?
</Barry_Clayton>
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LEE

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Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #866 on: November 13, 2015, 11:12:32 am »
To put these numbers in context I wonder if anyone apart from TG on this forum has a lifetime Eddington number >150 miles

I expect there are several with E=125 because that would equate to 200km Audax rides.

The problem with Eddington of course is that absolutely none of those hard-won 125 * 200km Audax rides count towards an E=150.

150 miles is 241km, a rather odd distance.  I reckon anyone approaching E=150 has bagged a load of 300km Audaxes, which would set them up for E=186*

* Just the non-trivial matter of riding 186 * 300km Audaxes.


I'm a year or two from E=100.  I know that's not even special compared to many people on this forum but it's still taken some doing.  I was thinking of having an "E=100" jersey made.

If I had E=200 then I'd have a jersey made, an illuminated hat made, a personalised reg plate made and possibly have it projected on the front of my house as well. E=200 puts you into an exclusive club.
Some people say I'm self-obsessed but that's enough about them.

Justin(e)

  • On my way out of here
Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #867 on: November 13, 2015, 11:37:28 am »
If I had E=200 then I'd have a jersey made, an illuminated hat made, a personalised reg plate made and possibly have it projected on the front of my house as well. E=200 puts you into an exclusive club.

Yerbut - E numbers have units.

So I easily have a E of 200 if the units are meters.

Just finished reading about Eddington and his numbers here.  Couldn't find any description on the this site.  It all seemed a little too Mornington Crescent.

But despite all of that - absolutely beautiful graphs (once I had my head around it).

HTFB

  • The Monkey and the Plywood Violin (RIP)
Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #868 on: November 13, 2015, 11:45:33 am »
The Wikipedia article misrepresents the dependency of the E-number on units. Since an E-number is a simple count it is a pure number, unit-free. But what you count is unit-dependent: classical E-numbers could be denoted Emileride or Emileday.

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #869 on: November 13, 2015, 01:31:03 pm »
Thank you for the excellent graphs Jo. Just as a matter of curiosity, how do you define a day (finishes at midnight or when the rider goes to bed)?

(When I built a spreadsheet to calculate my own E a couple of years ago, I decided to define a day as finishing when I slept (probably not how Arthur Eddington did it, but it works for me). However, this was more pragmatic than anything, because for many of my rides involving night riding I have no idea what distance I was at at midnight.)

Wowbagger

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Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #870 on: November 13, 2015, 01:56:14 pm »
There is a thread somewhere about this very issue. Eddington himself used the day and miles as his units. I think it is perfectly acceptable to include overnight rides,eg Dun Run.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

red marley

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #871 on: November 13, 2015, 02:12:01 pm »
I've had to use midnight in the rider's local time zone to split rides. It's too complicated to do anything else, especially for Miles who has no consistent day/night pattern to his riding.

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #872 on: November 13, 2015, 02:17:00 pm »
Inspired by Jo's magnificent visualisation of the Eddington numbers I had a go at recreating it in Google Sheets for my data. Pretty straightforward to do. I used the .csv datadump from VeloViewer to get all my rides then used MS Access to total up the daily mileages.

See it here...

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1c3WkBdf4T9TsZ-mM254QHBsaqt7n4AguOxeTgJPxCBk/edit?usp=sharing

red marley

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #873 on: November 13, 2015, 02:25:12 pm »
The helpful thing about visualising the distribution rather than just summarising with the Eddington Number is that is shows you where you need to put the effort in to increase it. Ideally what you want for least effort improvement is a nice shallow slope just to the right of the current Eddington number (as you have jochta). If you have a cliff like Kurt does, its harder to make significant gains in E.

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #874 on: November 13, 2015, 03:44:34 pm »
Cool, thanks for that jochta.  I've graphed my running Eddington number and concluded that, from my current 15, 17 is easily achievable within the next year, 19 within the following marathon-training cycle, and I may well never get to 20!

(just a small point - the inequality in column F needs changing to a ">=", rather than just ">".  Otherwise, nothing shows up at the exciting moments when, so to speak, E=E+1  ;D)
(Edit to add: the same for the one in column E - I assume you want your 15.00 mile ride to contribute to E=15, and your 28.00 to E=28.  I don't normally log warming up and cooling down from races, so Strava or Veloviewer would (should) record a 10m race as 10.00 miles.  If it recorded it as 9.99, I would manually change it in the spreadsheet to 10!)

Well spotted. I meant to change that to >= but forgot  :-[