Author Topic: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand  (Read 3966 times)

Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« on: January 11, 2015, 11:39:17 am »
Not a thing of beauty, but does appear to be perfectly functional.  I'm rather pleased with it!



With the help of the stand I shall be embarking on my first wheel build in making a dynamo front wheel using a dh-3n71 hub with exal xr2 rim and DT competition spokes.

I've also made a dishing tool from plywood.
Up the hills and round the bends

Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2015, 04:33:49 pm »
This is all you need to build up perfect wheels! Well, to be honest, this, and a lot of patience. I always find very funny the people who think you cannot build anything half-decent unless you have 1/100th mm dial gages on your truing stand  ;D

Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2015, 04:42:05 pm »
brilliant John. Looking forward to seeing the results.

Mike

Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2015, 07:52:05 pm »
Thanks! I'm looking forward to building them.  I like how clearly Musson lays everything out in the book, he makes the process sound eminently achievable.
Up the hills and round the bends

Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2015, 10:52:07 am »
About 15 years ago I sent a great day with Roger Musson he instructed me in the art of wheel building. He is still one of the best wheel builders I have come across. At the end of the day I had two brand new self built touring wheels and one of his truing stands. It is still in regular use whenever a wheel needs building or repairing.
Most people tip-toe through life hoping the make it safely to death.
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Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2015, 01:18:02 pm »
Good luck with your first build, but beware, it can be addictive!
Welding, fabrication and light engineering available to forum members.

Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2015, 01:20:32 pm »
Well, I already have another pair of wheels to re-spoke which I've realised will need doing since reading the Musson book.  This is a good thing in my book!
Up the hills and round the bends

Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2015, 01:25:04 pm »
I found it more difficult to build the stand than to build wheels!
I've never been very good at woodworking so, after 1 frustrating afternoon in the garage, I bought a Minoura stand and dishing tool.
I have seen Meccano and Lego built truing stands on the internet, which is more my ability.

Anyway, good work.  There is nothing mystical about building wheels.  Just follow Rogers instructions in the book in a methodical way and you should be cranking out top quality wheels in no time.

One tip (I can't remember if it's in the book or not): before doing the final tension and truing, put the rim tape, tube and tyre on the wheel and inflate to 100 PSI.  Then do the final tension, truing a dishing.  I've had wheels lose 40% of their tension when a tyre was put on, and the last rear wheel I built went out of dish when the tyre was pumped up!

Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2015, 06:15:28 pm »
You should tension the wheel without the tyre on, or at least not pumped up.  You'll be over otherwise and risk rim damage. 

Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #9 on: January 12, 2015, 07:28:52 pm »
I always put on the rim tape before tensioning the spokes. There's a good reason for that, I learned it from Jobst Brandt: a spoke that snap during tensioning could easily fly through the room, and eventually through your eye!

Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #10 on: January 15, 2015, 01:29:50 pm »
And this is my wheel dishing tool:



Made from a piece of scrap plywood and a cheap sliding bevel blade.  It works very well.
Up the hills and round the bends

Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2015, 10:27:13 am »
Confession: I've never built a wheel! The thing that puts me off is doubts about getting the right amount of tensioning. Would I really need one of those meter things to get it right?

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2015, 11:08:20 am »
Not for standard spoke sizes. Sound (pitch) when plucked varies with tension.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Kim

  • An appetite for the epic, but no real stamina
Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2015, 04:39:48 pm »
And even if you're tone deaf and can't be arsed lugging the oscilloscope to the truing stand, you can usually get the tensions in a strong-rimmed touring wheel right enough by feel.

I wouldn't want to build a low-spoke-count racing wheel without a meter, though.
Watching the TV without subtitles is like riding up a hill without using the gears :)

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #14 on: January 17, 2015, 05:34:41 pm »
Most smartphones can detect and identify pitch quite well enough for wheelbuilding.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

jane

  • Mad pie-hating female
Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2015, 05:51:57 pm »
Really impressed...I took one look at the photo of Musson's stand in his ebook and immediately threw in the towel.  Really love Musson's attitude and approach.  The instructor on my mechanics course recommended him as the only thing you need to learn how to build good wheels.  As well as the time, patience and attention to detail he has, of course.
My great uncles only ever used pitch to check tension.  On my mechanics course we used a tension meter.  However, I found that if I was really careful, followed all the advice, didn't try to skip, then the final tension check showed the spokes were pretty well equalised.  When, for various reasons, I behaved differently eg rushed, got distracted, etc, the final wheel was true, but goodness me, those spokes were at sixes and sevens.  So as Musson says, a tension meter won't build you a good wheel.  It sure showed me how bad a wheel I could build, though.

Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #16 on: January 18, 2015, 11:50:46 am »
It really wasn't too difficult to build, just took a bit of time.  Mine was very hastily made on a black & decker workmate in between looking after children either in the kitchen or on the patio and it turned out just fine.

The component parts were sawn up using a jigsaw from bits of plywood and mdf I had lying around in the shed.

The only part that needed a 'specialist' tool was routing the two channels but you could drill a series of holes and file them out or use a coping saw as an alternative. 

The dropouts are not made from metal, as suggested in the book, but 2 pieces of 3mm perspex (the same width as used for the radial and lateral gauges) superglued together.  The only thing you need to watch out for is the perspex shattering when drilled, as happened to me.

I was pleasantly surprised by just how forgiving the design is.
Up the hills and round the bends

Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #17 on: January 18, 2015, 12:00:18 pm »
The nipple wrench was made using a dremel grinding attachment in a power drill.  It's rough but works just fine.
Up the hills and round the bends

Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #18 on: January 27, 2015, 10:40:04 pm »
Started building my wheel tonight only to be thwarted by having been sent only 29 spokes by rose bikes, I need 32!  Hopefully the missing 3 will be shipped quickly and I can get on with the build.  I found getting the lacing pattern correct easy enough.

I also need to fettle my nipple driver which proved to be too wide for the eyelet recesses.
Up the hills and round the bends

Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #19 on: January 28, 2015, 11:32:09 am »
Looking forward.to seeing the wheel build. I need to start mine, but have been thwarted by late nights. Resorted to polishing frame last night after applying hammering to paint chips on Monday. Need the audax reassembled quick... And that needs the new rear wheel.


Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #20 on: January 28, 2015, 11:38:31 am »
The bits:


Spot the missing spokes competition:


Long way to go but it at least resembles something like a wheel!
Up the hills and round the bends

Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #21 on: February 01, 2015, 02:19:30 am »
A shame about the missing spokes. I just finished my first wheel. An Exal Lx17 on a Hope Rs Mono rear hub. Hub with a view to weatherproofing and rim as it matched the front dynamo wheel. I put a Schwalbe One Tubeless on it tomorrow and hopefully get the rest of the bike built back up. Might even ride around the block...

Very pleased and learnt a lot.

Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #22 on: February 01, 2015, 10:14:35 pm »
A shame about the missing spokes. I just finished my first wheel. An Exal Lx17 on a Hope Rs Mono rear hub. Hub with a view to weatherproofing and rim as it matched the front dynamo wheel. I put a Schwalbe One Tubeless on it tomorrow and hopefully get the rest of the bike built back up. Might even ride around the block...

Very pleased and learnt a lot.

Well done! So that was your first wheel build then?

Spokes should be here tomorrow according to the tracking, DHL taking their sweet time, rose posted on Wednesday.

I want to get it built in the next couple of weeks so that I can give it a good test before my first 300 at the end of April.
Up the hills and round the bends

Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #23 on: February 02, 2015, 09:17:49 am »
A shame about the missing spokes. I just finished my first wheel. An Exal Lx17 on a Hope Rs Mono rear hub. Hub with a view to weatherproofing and rim as it matched the front dynamo wheel. I put a Schwalbe One Tubeless on it tomorrow and hopefully get the rest of the bike built back up. Might even ride around the block...

Very pleased and learnt a lot.

Well done! So that was your first wheel build then?

Spokes should be here tomorrow according to the tracking, DHL taking their sweet time, rose posted on Wednesday.

I want to get it built in the next couple of weeks so that I can give it a good test before my first 300 at the end of April.

Yes, first build. I think my spokes would have benefitted from being 1 or 2mm shorter, but it still tensioned up to about 130kgf without any trouble. Took a couple of goes to get the basic tensioning close enough to make truing easy, but now it's in the frame it runs as well as any other wheel I've got. Chain and bar tape tonight and quick spin around the block ,then guards and rack on and some more miles over the next few weeks.

I've booked the Mull of Kintyre 600, and expect to use this bike if I feel up to starting, so needs some shakedown beforehand.

Also, I've mounted up Schwalbe One tubeless tyres front and rear and they seem to work fine on the LX17 rims. I'll spend a bit of time being ginger, but hoping that they will work OK and that I'll be fully tubeless (until n+1 comes along)

Mike

Re: Showing off my 'Musson' wheel truing stand
« Reply #24 on: February 10, 2015, 12:09:01 am »
I finally completed the wheel tonight and I'm delighted with how it turned out. Lateral trueness and dish are about as close as I'm ever likely to get. Radial trueness isn't quite so good but well within the tolerances suggested in the Musson book.  The spoke tensions appear to be very even too. I'm optimistic that this will be a good wheel.

By carefully and methodically reading the instructions in the book the build turned out to be reasonably straight forward, really only requiring time and patience.  I re-read a lot of the book until I felt the salient points had sunk in.

Obviously the proof is in the riding, which I should get to do pretty soon.

Have to say that I very much enjoyed the building process too.
Up the hills and round the bends