Author Topic: You learn something every day  (Read 1037 times)

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
You learn something every day
« on: October 01, 2008, 11:29:59 am »
Today I found a fully-grown conker on a red-flowering horse chestnut tree. I always thought they were sterile. The shell, in keeping with red-flowering trees, was devoid of spikes. All the other "conkers" on and under that tree seemed to be empty shells.

The dog learned something too: much as you enjoy chasing sticks, it is not a good idea to stand underneath a tree waiting for an especially large one you have just seen thrown into said tree to fall out again. It is liable to hurt your paw when it lands thereupon. :(
Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

Re: You learn something every day
« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2008, 11:35:51 am »
Paris is a great place for picking up big conkers (I'd recommend the Parc des Buttes-Chamont).  I don't think the French actually play conkers, so they're left on the ground unmolested.
And Darkness and Decay and the Coronavirus held illimitable dominion over all.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Waking up now, put the kettle on!
Re: You learn something every day
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2008, 02:27:07 pm »
Loads of chestnut trees in Poland too - they're actually the national tree of next door Ukraine and originated in the Bulgaria/Greece region - but no conker games either. Instead, Polish kids make little figures out of them with matchsticks for arms and legs.

Has the chestnut-destroying beetle - I can't remember its proper name, but it also comes from Greece and is spreading northwards - reached the UK? It breeds in piles of leaves on the ground over winter.
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: You learn something every day
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2008, 02:48:03 pm »
Loads of chestnut trees in Poland too - they're actually the national tree of next door Ukraine and originated in the Bulgaria/Greece region - but no conker games either. Instead, Polish kids make little figures out of them with matchsticks for arms and legs.

Has the chestnut-destroying beetle - I can't remember its proper name, but it also comes from Greece and is spreading northwards - reached the UK? It breeds in piles of leaves on the ground over winter.

I believe it has; there are a few sick/moribund-looking trees but most seem healthy hereabouts.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: You learn something every day
« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2008, 06:02:31 pm »
A year or two ago a pair of horse chestnuts in our local park very suddenly died of something nasty and were removed. I've seen other trees with big cracks in their bark and patches falling off. I didn't think this was a beetle-related problem, more to do with a fungus, although I am aware that Dutch Elm Disease was a combination of the two - the beetle boring holes in the tree and the fungus using those holes to invade.
Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

Really Ancien

Re: You learn something every day
« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2008, 06:08:31 pm »
Bleeding Canker.
Forest Research - Bleeding Canker of Horse Chestnut
A. x carnea, Red horse chestnut, Hybrids between A. hippocastanum and A. parva
these are fertile and breed true, so they have conkers.
A. indica Indian horse chestnut , this is a different species and has pink flowers with a cultivar 'Sidney Pearce' which has a darker red flower.

Damon.