Author Topic: EASY BROMPTON REAR WHEEL REMOVAL  (Read 2652 times)

EASY BROMPTON REAR WHEEL REMOVAL
« on: April 25, 2015, 05:20:43 pm »
Hi fellow Bromptonauts!

In the last couple of months, a few members of the Brompton New York City Facebook page asked
about a clinic on rear wheel removal/installation.
I also needed to replace a few parts by the rear; titanium axle nuts, new cogs, new Ultegra chain,
new Primo Comet tire. So while doing the work; I figured might as well take some 1080 high definition
videos and close-up photos. Hoping this might help new owners and maybe even long term users :D

Let me know what you folks think. Any other short cuts or easier methods I can use?

Cheers,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lgfd9Gt_LGk&list=UUHyRS8bRu6zPoymgKaIoDLA&index=1

Jacomus

  • My favourite gender neutral pronoun is comrade
Re: EASY BROMPTON REAR WHEEL REMOVAL
« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2015, 08:30:01 pm »
That's the method I use, seems to be the easiest. Although on mine, for some reason, I can't avoid having to remove the outer nuts and the retention clips.
"The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity." Amelia Earhart

Zipperhead

  • The cyclist formerly known as Big Helga
Re: EASY BROMPTON REAR WHEEL REMOVAL
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2015, 10:43:03 am »
What a complete and utter faff you (the OP) make that look.

Why not unscrew the gear change chain/rod, then chain tensioner can come off completely and you're not struggling to get the chain around the whole unit (also if there's any hamfistedness risking damaging the gear change linkage).
Our son does know who Boz Scaggs is, we've done ok as parents.

Re: EASY BROMPTON REAR WHEEL REMOVAL
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2015, 08:19:44 pm »
I don't think fixing a rear Brompton puncture is something anyone wants to do on the road.  The titanium bikes don't even have a pump (and yes, they count that towards the quoted weight saving, which is naughty) because frankly if you can afford two grand for one you can also afford to whistle up a taxi...
Never tell me the odds.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: EASY BROMPTON REAR WHEEL REMOVAL
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2015, 08:38:11 pm »
It's a long time since I've done it, but I'd be tempted to patch the tube in situ (not tried it on a Brompton, though, so it may be even more faff).  With the XRF-8 the gear cable is a bit easier, but the anti-rotation tab thingies are stubborn wee bastards that need persuading with tools.

Or the taxi/bus option, obviously.  If that's not the right solution, then you're probably on a Mildly Inappropriate Bikeā„¢ :)

Titanium is a false economy as a weight saving on a Brom.  It seems to be mostly a corrosion-prevention tactic.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: EASY BROMPTON REAR WHEEL REMOVAL
« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2015, 08:46:22 pm »
HK is happy with her Ti Brommie purely on a weight basis. The Al seatpost got replaced with an aftermarket Ti post after the nickel plating repeatedly lifted. She notices even a couple of hundred extra grams (blind tested with a Brompton toolkit)
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: EASY BROMPTON REAR WHEEL REMOVAL
« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2015, 08:56:01 pm »
I'm not disputing that Ti saves weight, just that given the cost it's about the last change you want to make to the spec in order to do so.  A basic, lightweight Brompton is lovely to lift, but as a sufferer of Knees, I'd much rather wheel it and put the weight into more gears.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: EASY BROMPTON REAR WHEEL REMOVAL
« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2015, 09:01:34 pm »
HK's is 6sp, which is lighter than the 8sp hub and has a wide range. Different strokes, etc.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Re: EASY BROMPTON REAR WHEEL REMOVAL
« Reply #8 on: April 29, 2015, 09:48:12 pm »
The Ti conversion was really a vanity project for me but the steel rear triangle is a pretty unsightly part, especially when scuffed and rusty.  The Ti parts are a lot better finished; the fork crown was perfectly cut and the welds were neat.

The Ti seatpost, at the price I paid for it on a new bike, was rather more worthwhile for weight saving, especially in the three-inch longer "extended" size which I need (pulled right up to the stop gives the perfect 30.5" saddle top-BB spindle height for me; the standard length post is too short for most men).  I don't think Brompton's flirtation with alu seatposts went very well at all as it was so short-lived.

Brompton could make things a lot easier by bolting the chain tensioner to the frame so it's no longer concentric with the axle (like a derailleur bike) but the need for a toggle chain and anti-rotation fittings (needed to counteract the torque differential in the hub from any gear except direct drive) is always going to militate against very quick removal*.  Actually, you could redesign an awful lot on a Brompton but when they can sell the basic ones for nearly a grand each as fast as they can make them, there's not muh incentive.  And I suppose backwards compatibility is a plus point; imagine having to carry "old" and "new" components for everything, currently only an issue with things like LWB and SWB cable outers.

*do the 1- and 2-speed bikes have anti-rotation washers?  They're not necessary to stop rotation in use but I suppose they make it easier to tighten the axle nuts.
Never tell me the odds.

whosatthewheel

Re: EASY BROMPTON REAR WHEEL REMOVAL
« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2019, 07:55:37 am »
Yesterday I attempted for the first time to remove/refit the rear wheel of my wife's M3L...

I don't know what the fuss is about. I watched a video and took me 5 minutes to do the job and only requires one tool...
repeat to myself: "I shouldn't believe internet scaremongery...  ::-) "

Re: EASY BROMPTON REAR WHEEL REMOVAL
« Reply #10 on: January 18, 2019, 09:49:17 pm »
I've only had to do this a couple of times. The second was last weekend, when I needed to strip and clean the sprockets.

I did the job without folding the rear end. It's easier to see what's going on. I agree about taking out the 3-speed chain, and removing the chain tensioner entirely. Putting it back, I threaded the tensioner onto the chain first, and then fitted it onto the wheel nut. Makes it pretty-much a one-handed job - although it was dark, and the first time I didn't get the chain into the derailleur properly.