Author Topic: Words  (Read 8369 times)

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Words
« Reply #150 on: January 12, 2020, 09:48:10 pm »
Could we have a ban on 'leverage' as a verb ?
(YACFers of course wouldn't noun when they should be verbing!)

e.g.
In the coming years, initiatives will leverage a solid manufacturing base

My old school emails to suggest I 'leverage my professional network to get to introduced to people you should know' !

It's a legitimate term for a particular form of financial shenanigans.  So if you're planning to expand your manufacturing base via a steaming pile of debt, then go ahead.

Otherwise, it can be filed under silly management speak.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Words
« Reply #151 on: January 12, 2020, 10:03:52 pm »
Could we have a ban on 'leverage' as a verb ?
(YACFers of course wouldn't noun when they should be verbing!)

e.g.
In the coming years, initiatives will leverage a solid manufacturing base

My old school emails to suggest I 'leverage my professional network to get to introduced to people you should know' !

It's a legitimate term for a particular form of financial shenanigans.  So if you're planning to expand your manufacturing base via a steaming pile of debt, then go ahead.

Otherwise, it can be filed under silly management speak.

I got out of printing just as computer technology was turning it from an industry where big lumps of cast-iron, once bought, would print for decades, to an industry where big lumps of welded steel housed imminently obsolete electronic hardware and software, which had to be replaced every few years.  So printing firms became highly leveraged, marginally profitable, and regularly collapsed, putting many people out of work.  (as an aside, the venerable firm which printed the AUK magazine went under a few years ago).

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Words
« Reply #152 on: January 12, 2020, 11:33:32 pm »
I wonder why so many languages, including English, have such euphonious 3-or-4 syllable words for 'butterfly' eg schmetterling, papillon, sommerfugl, pili-pala. Welsh has at least 2 more which make up in curious etymology what they lack in euphony, namely 'glöyn byw' - 'live coal' and 'iâr fach yr haf' - 'little summer chicken'.

There's a degree of onomatopoeia with some of these words, suggesting childish affection.

Many of the short words for domestic beasts vary much between European languages but show scant affection.