Author Topic: National Treasures  (Read 7888 times)

Redlight

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Re: National Treasures
« Reply #50 on: January 09, 2016, 12:00:52 pm »
Judi Dench, according to Tracy Ullman's new sketch show
Between the Disney abattoir and the chemical refinery

Vince

  • Can't climb; won't climb
Re: National Treasures
« Reply #51 on: January 11, 2016, 09:24:12 am »
Playing opposite Leonard Rossiter in Rising Damp must make Frances De La Tour a National Treasure.
216km from Marsh Gibbon

Re: National Treasures
« Reply #52 on: January 11, 2016, 09:47:33 am »
David Bowie must surely qualify.
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mattc

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Re: National Treasures
« Reply #53 on: January 11, 2016, 10:05:06 am »
David Bowie must surely qualify.
Beat me to it!  :thumbsup:
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

Vince

  • Can't climb; won't climb
Re: National Treasures
« Reply #54 on: January 11, 2016, 10:56:39 am »
It thought (From Mr L's earlier post) that being dead was an excluding factor. Otherwise I would agree.
216km from Marsh Gibbon

Mr Larrington

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Re: National Treasures
« Reply #55 on: January 11, 2016, 01:13:04 pm »
While it is traditional for Treasure to be Buried (Yarrrrrr!) it's probably an automatic exclusion in this context.
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Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Re: National Treasures
« Reply #56 on: January 16, 2016, 11:08:37 am »
Japan has Living National Treasures.

slope

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Re: National Treasures
« Reply #57 on: January 17, 2016, 08:01:08 pm »
Maxine Peake

Re: National Treasures
« Reply #58 on: January 18, 2016, 09:16:13 am »
Eric Clapton may be a national treasure. He is still alive, is a recovering alcoholic and drug user, has received numerous awards and commendations and has used his fortune to open the Crossroads centre for recovering substance abusers.

Re: National Treasures
« Reply #59 on: January 18, 2016, 09:37:06 am »
Eric Clapton may be a national treasure. He is still alive, is a recovering alcoholic and drug user, has received numerous awards and commendations and has used his fortune to open the Crossroads centre for recovering substance abusers.
... and has never disavowed his support for Enoch Powell. I'm afraid that trumps (see what I did there?) all the other stuff in my view. EC gets the thumbs down from me.

Tim Hall

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Re: National Treasures
« Reply #60 on: January 18, 2016, 02:03:42 pm »
Have we had Joan Bakewell yet?
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citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: National Treasures
« Reply #61 on: January 18, 2016, 09:59:00 pm »

Have we had Joan Bakewell yet?

Only in our fantasies, Tim.

Redlight

  • Enjoying life in the slow lane
Re: National Treasures
« Reply #62 on: January 21, 2016, 11:23:23 pm »
Barry Cryer

(more later)
Between the Disney abattoir and the chemical refinery

Wowbagger

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Re: National Treasures
« Reply #63 on: January 21, 2016, 11:35:27 pm »
Have we had Joan Bakewell yet?

If you a certain age, "thinking man's crumpet".  :P
Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

Re: National Treasures
« Reply #64 on: January 22, 2016, 08:46:55 am »
Denis Norden
Billy Connolly
Shirley Bassey

Wowbagger

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Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: National Treasures
« Reply #66 on: January 22, 2016, 01:53:10 pm »
Judi Dench, according to Tracy Ullman's new sketch show

I saw that last night for the first time. The show on the whole was a bit patchy, but Judi Dench going round blocking up toilets in posh hotels just because she could get away with it was very amusing. And it instantly made me think of this thread (even before they used the phrase 'national treasure') - pleased to see I'm not the only one.

Cudzoziemiec

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Re: National Treasures
« Reply #67 on: March 09, 2016, 08:02:33 pm »
About John Peel in 1979: "He was yet to turn 40 and was a few years off becoming a national treasure but John was smart enough not to give us the benefit of his wisdom in the music business. I would like to think he hated both those phrases, 'national treasure' and 'music business'."
I do not ride a great big Mercian, gangster tanwalls, fixed cog in the back.

Re: National Treasures
« Reply #68 on: January 28, 2020, 06:26:00 pm »
I think the late Nicholas Parsons probably qualified.
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Andrij

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Re: National Treasures
« Reply #69 on: January 28, 2020, 07:33:44 pm »
I think the late Nicholas Parsons probably qualified.

Definitely.
;D  Andrij.  I pronounce you Complete and Utter GIT   :thumbsup:

Wowbagger

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Re: National Treasures
« Reply #70 on: January 29, 2020, 09:51:34 am »
I think the late Nicholas Parsons probably qualified.


Bzzt! Repetition!  ;D

I associate the term with people who were pre eminent in their field but who are now advanced in years.  Usually the continue to produce strong work.

Sir Ian MacKellan springs to mind. Helen Mirren is another, along with Judy Dench.  David Hockney from the arts world and Bruce Forsyth from light entertainment.

I had Dench & Mirren in mind as well. Nicholas Parsons? He's still gushing his way through JaM and he's over 90.

I think Brian Cox has "trainee national treasure" written all over him, but of course he's too young to be the genuine article.

I would also mention Simon Rattle, except he blotted his copybook by buggering off to Berlin. John Lill isn't famous enough outside his field (concert pianist) but he has been around for years (won the Moscow piano competition in the 1970s IIRC) and in recent years survived a mugging attack in which the shits who attacked him deliberately slashed his hands.
Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

mattc

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Re: National Treasures
« Reply #71 on: January 29, 2020, 06:33:09 pm »
A point there to Mr Bagger, well listened.

So, now you have 4 years on  National Treasures, starting ...
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

Wowbagger

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Re: National Treasures
« Reply #72 on: January 31, 2020, 06:54:46 pm »
I'd nominate Leonard Barden. Because he is a chess player no-one else will care, but he was a good player in his day (British Champion 1954), has turned down an honour (*BE but I don't know which), was responsible for the training of the young players who made England the world's second-strongest chess-playing nation in the 1980s (behind USSR) and has been writing an excellent article for the Graun for as long as anyone can remember.

He is also one of the few surviving players with a Morphy Number of 3, and it is because I once played him that I have a Morphy Number of 4.

He is also a damned good sort.

I read that today will be Leonard Barden's last daily chess column for the Evening Standard. He has produced one every day since June 1956 with days off for certain public holidays. He has been writing for the Grauniad for even longer, but that, apart from when there is a major event like a World Championship to cover, is only a weekly column so I think he is carrying on. He has also written for the Financial Times since 1974.

I'm full of admiration for the guy. For 16 years I wrote a weekly column on chess for the Recorder group of newspapers (Ilford, Romford and Newham principally, but for some reason it also occasionally turned up in the Ham & High - for whom it was totally irrelevant as it was about chess in Essex) and it was often a struggle to get suitable material.

He was largely responsible for "The English Chess Explosion", as it was dubbed at the time - an intensive programme training the strongest junior players and designed to produce grandmasters. It was a phenomenal success and, after Tony Miles became the first English GM when he won the World U20 Championship, several others followed and England ended up winning the silver medals in the Olympiad, behind the Soviet Union. He continued to keep a database of strong juniors' results and once I was helping to run a tournament in London. The previous weekend my daughters, then aged 12 & 17 I think, had been playing in an adult tournament against some strong players, and each won their section. I was writing up some results when Leonard Barden appeared and came over to speak to me about them. He had clearly seen the results and was impressed - previously, although they had been around for a long time with pretty good results, they were normally about one level below the best players nationally in their age groups: on a good day they could beat almost anyone, but didn't have the consistency to be really considered "top players". I can't really recall much about the conversation other than to say that I was nonplussed that he would take such a keen interest and I was surprised that he knew who I was.

https://www.standard.co.uk/staticpage/chess/chess-with-leonard-barden-a1939236.html

Quote
Today is my final chess article (dedicated to SJF) for the Evening Standard. The series began on 4 June 1956 and has continued for 63 years, 7 months and 27 days without missing a day, a world record in all journalism for a daily column by a single individual.

Thanks to loyal readers, especially those of long standing who have solved the puzzles over years or decades. Good luck with today's puzzle and with all your future games.
Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

Wowbagger

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Re: National Treasures
« Reply #73 on: February 05, 2020, 11:08:01 am »
Probably too obscure for the low-brow oafs who inhabit YACF ( :P) but Dame Fanny Waterman is approaching her 100th birthday (22nd March). She remains an utterly inspirational piano teacher and was the founder of the Leeds International Piano Competition well over half a century ago. The Leeds is regarded as one of the top piano competitions anywhere in the world. There's an article about her in the latest issue of The Pianist magazine.
Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

Re: National Treasures
« Reply #74 on: February 05, 2020, 11:16:52 am »
Banksy.
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