Author Topic: [HAMR] Another go .. TG??  (Read 113531 times)

Oaky

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Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1000 on: March 04, 2018, 10:13:37 pm »
From Audax Club Mid-Essex:

Chapeau Indeed ! 

 :thumbsup:   :thumbsup:   :thumbsup:   :thumbsup:   :thumbsup:   :thumbsup:   :thumbsup:   :thumbsup:   :thumbsup:   :thumbsup:   :thumbsup:   :thumbsup:

+1

Anyone got a picture of the OYTT tea towel in it's display position in The Compasses?
You are in a maze of twisty flat droves, all alike.

85.4 miles from Marsh Gibbon

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http://acme.bike

clarion

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Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1001 on: March 05, 2018, 10:30:43 am »
A Pedant Writes: Surely that should be 'TYTT' now? ;)
Getting there...

grams

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Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1002 on: March 05, 2018, 03:19:30 pm »
Total "only" 285,478.

I wonder whether Steve has a record of his other miles.

Steve's all-time mileage on Strava is 301,292 km. And he only joined in December 2012 and it looks like he only bothers uploading long rides (or perhaps he only does long rides...).

Anyway, well done Steve!

Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1003 on: March 10, 2018, 09:41:43 pm »
Congratulations to Steve. Missing catching up with his daily mileage. Hope that all is going well after such an enormous effort!
Eat, sleep, ride, repeat.............
Now
Rest ( Ride ) and recuperate!!!!
Look forward to seeing what you are up to next.

Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1004 on: March 18, 2018, 01:01:15 pm »
72,388 miles is my total distance for my 2017-18 HAMR (still to be verified by the UMCA). After my last day of my HAMR on 3rd March I pretty much ignored the whole thing and went to sleep.
Once I'd stopped, I was often falling asleep in the middle of the day. I have ignored all my messages etc on social media. Just wanted to get away from it all and just bum around for a bit. I've barely ridden my bike at all in the last two weeks and have been out for a few short walks. Now I'm starting to get back into my riding and probably do some walking then running. I'll start very easily just doing very short rides and walks while I can get on with other stuff. I've been at the HAMR for over 3 years now. Lots of stuff to sort out and put back in order.
Two weeks later, I'm feeling more awake and my legs have stopped aching. I had to do a report on my HAMR for the UMCA (as below) That should tell the very basic story but there is still more to the story and that's just the riding. I tried to keep it brief.



Steve Abraham 2017 HAMR report

I set off at midnight on March 3rd, 2017 with Matt Seward, who had ridden a few training rides with me. On that first day I clocked 319 miles and it felt easy and was a good start to my year.
The next few days went well and I felt comfortable for the rest of the month averaging around 230 miles a day. I was riding for around 95-100 hours a week, not including stops and from my power meter, my fitness seemed to be improving.
On into April and I could see signs of improvements in my fitness and my speed was increasing slightly, but my mileage had dropped, which did puzzle me because I thought that I was spending the same number of hours on the road. Looking back at my rides on Strava, I probably was spending roughly the same time out on the road but was stopping for a bit longer so was riding a few hours less each week. The decrease in mileage didn't concern me very much because I could see the increase in speed and the weather was improving. I had the whole of summer to catch up the lost miles and as I could see my speed increase I expected to get faster as the weather improved as well as my fitness hopefully improving. I was still riding around 95 hours each week.
I never really noticed any improvements in speed during May, nor did my speed increase noticeably but I was riding for slightly fewer hours. My mileage remained pretty steady at around 1550 each week, so with the good start it meant that my daily average was dropping.
I hoped that in June I would get a bit faster and maybe even ride for a few more hours each day. I didn't try to force myself to ride extra hours and never used an alarm clock to get up earlier for an early start because getting too far behind on sleep would slow me down in the long run. However, I was starting to feel more tired. Well, I wasn't expecting it to be easy and I still felt reasonably in control. Much more so than in 2015 and although my daily mileage wasn't as much as I'd have liked, I still had 4 months of good weather to come. I wasn't just feeling a bit more tired, I was feeling stronger as well, so I didn't try to force a few extra hours each week, I just tried to keep it steady and thought that better weather and improvements in my fitness would give me extra speed.
Having noticed that my speed didn't improve as much as I'd liked during June, I tried going easier and a bit slower for a few weeks. I was riding roughly the same hours as I was in April. I thought that I might have recovered, got some training effect and hopefully get my speed up some more. This did work, so for the last two weeks of July, I was around 1-2mph faster than I was in June. Instead of using the extra speed to try and do more miles, I used the extra time for more rest. I was starting to feel a bit tired and I thought that an hour or so extra sleep each day would improve my recovery and give me a further improvement in speed.
By August I was getting very tired. Physically, I felt much better. My speed hadn't dropped since I'd eased off in early July and I was feeling stronger if anything. But I was feeling more tired.
At the end of July, I rode a 24 hour time trial and finished the event in the early afternoon, which meant that I got a longer than usual sleep before I set off the next day. I was surprised at how well I was going the day after the 24 hour.
Thinking back to that ride, I decided to try getting a good sleep of around 10-12 hours then doing 2 days with little sleep in-between to try and replicate what I did on the 24 hour and the following day. I thought that riding steady might not do so much damage and that the longer sleep would give me a much better recovery than my usual sleep of around 7 hours. Then, if that worked, maybe I could do 2–3 days with minimal sleep followed by a very good long sleep for recovery.
I only kept it up for about a week and soon fell back into my more regular sleeping pattern. I was now down to riding around 85 hours a week. I didn't try to force myself to go back up to 95 hour weeks again. My speed was still OK and I thought that keeping my riding hours down to 85 hours would give me an extra 10 hours more sleep each week than my first few months. I thought that would hopefully mean an improvement in my fitness and speed. After all, I seemed to get fitter at the beginning of the year while riding 95 hours a week, so only riding for 85, in theory, should mean that I recover faster, I would have thought.
Amanda's world record was starting to look like it was getting out of my reach but I still hadn't given up on it entirely. If I could get my speed and number of riding hours up, I still might have had a chance. And if not, there was still the men’s record and my original aim to go for. Not exactly what I was after but giving up never made any sense.
By September I felt even more tired. I asked myself why I was still tired. I was riding fewer hours than I was in the first few months, so what was different? I was riding faster, so perhaps if I eased off the pace a bit, along with the extra sleep, I should recover and hopefully be able to ride faster more easily and for a few more hours. But, it didn't work.
Just over a week into September Idai, from my support team, who rides an elliptigo bike suggested I use the A505 Leighton Buzzard by-pass. I looked at his rides on Strava and from his data it looked like it might help me go a bit faster for the same effort. Elliptigos are affected by headwinds more than bicycles because you have ride them in an upright position and can't really get into a tuck like you can on a bike but Idai was getting some good speeds (for an elliptigo)
I tried the new route and it did seem to be faster for the same effort. It also had the advantage of being close to my home and being a 10 mile circuit riding up and down the same stretch of road. Roughly 1-2000ft less climbing than my regular routes and more sheltered from the wind. It was also near a town so it would be easy to get supplies. It also had a 24 hour McDonalds, which I could use for toilet and short sleep stops, as I had it in mind to do rides through the night. Being close to home meant that if I started getting sleepy I wasn't committed to a long ride home while sleepy. If I got sleepy I could take a nap in McDonalds before riding home and going to bed for a better sleep. I could also leave food, drink and clothing just off the road so that I could travel lighter and not have to send so much time stopped buying food and drink as I did on my regular routes.
Mid September I fell ill and didn't ride for two days. It wasn't that I felt so ill I couldn't ride. I was just very sleepy and didn't think it wise to ride when I was so sleepy. I thought I might be at risk of falling asleep while riding and that if I did try and ride, I'd be very slow. I thought that my time would be better spent getting over my illness as well as maybe getting some recovery so that when I went out again, I'd be faster and better rested.
After my two days spent almost entirely asleep in bed, I felt awake enough to ride but had painful legs, especially my calf muscles. I had my suspicions that it was DVT. I'd been laying in bed for a very long time and seemed to have the symptoms. If I stood still it got very painful. Even riding was painful but not as bad as standing still. I couldn't stand still for more than a few seconds and started walking on the spot whenever I had to stop, including when I stopped for a pee. It got so bad near the end of one day that I stopped for a meal so I could sit down and rest. I sat down for about 20 minutes before the pain subsided enough for me to stand at the bar to order my food.
I tried using compression stockings that I had left over from when I had the broken ankle in 2015 and they really helped relieve the pain so I bought some compression tights which made a big difference. I don't know if it was DVT or not. I did hear from another in my team who was ill at about the same time, that he also had painful legs, so it could have just been what was going around at the time. Within about a week it was pretty much gone. In spite of riding fewer hours, I was getting more and more tired.
By late September I was often feeling very tired. Sometimes sleeping at the roadside because my concentration was going. I never took any chances with getting sleepy on the road.
The best way I can describe how it felt is that feeling of tiredness you feel in your legs. I was feeling that on the inside. I was struggling to keep food down and bringing it up about once an hour. At worst I was riding for about 2 hours where I was being sick every 2 miles. I found somewhere to sleep at the roadside and was back to my normal being sick about once an hour again.
I started taking caffeine. I was already drinking coffee, but I moved on to caffeine pills.
I didn't intend it to be for the rest of my year. The idea was that the caffeine would keep me more awake so that I would ride faster. My legs didn't feel bad, I was just tired and didn't feel very good. Riding a bit faster would buy me more recovery so that I could hopefully, catch back up on sleep and be able to stop using the caffeine. The caffeine really did seem to help too. My speed increased and I felt a lot better.
Into October I was still struggling to ride around 85 hours a week but although the caffeine was helping, I knew it was a bad situation.
After giving it some thought, there was only one thing that made sense. I read up on sleep about 15 years ago and in spite of me waking up naturally every day without an alarm and getting as many hours sleep as I thought I needed, all the signs were there that I really wasn't getting enough sleep. The only thing that made sense was that I had sleep apnea. I knew that I snored. So I bought some anti snoring throat spray from a chemist to see if it helped.
When I woke up the next morning I felt a whole lot better! After a few days and feeling much better but still exhausted, I bought a chin strap and nose vents to see if I could improve on the throat spray (which wasn't really for apnea, but I knew it would probably help if I did have apnea) I felt better still. Then I had another look to see if I could go one up on the chin strap and came up with a tongue stabiliser, which is simply a device that you put your tongue into before bed. It basically looks like a todlers dummy (pacifier) and keeps your tongue pulled out while you sleep so that your airway stays unblocked. That made the world of difference. I also tried another MAD device but didn't think it was working so well so went back to the tongue stabilser.
That was a huge turning point, from there on, every day I felt better and less tired. After about a week I started to taper off the caffeine. Because I was sleeping so much better, I was feeling better, even though I was spending as many hours asleep as I was before.
When I got a little better, I even felt like I was catching up on sleep while sleeping for fewer hours than when I was falling behind on sleep. This meant that I could start to build up my riding hours again.
Coming off the caffeine did reduce my speed a bit but the extra few hours riding each week more than made up for that, so my mileage started to creep up a bit. Laying off the caffeine was only going to help me sleep better and give me a better recovery, so the short term loss would have hopefully given me a longer term gains and besides, I could always go back to caffeine at the end of the year to wring out a few extra miles.
Another reassuring sign was that in late October I became slightly ill and got a productive cough. When I normally get a productive cough, it usually gets very bad and lasts for weeks. When I started coughing I thought that having that on top of how tired I was, I might have ended up in a very bad way and been so ill that I'd have lost a lot of miles. This may have potentially ended my attempt. I do wonder if discovering my apnea when I did was just in time for me to not get beaten up by my illness. My cough never really got bad at all and was gone within a week.
Into late November and early December, I was feeling a lot better. I was still riding on the Leighton Buzzard by-pass and was getting very fed up with it. It wasn't so much using the same road all day, it was just the amount of traffic. It had a lot of advantages and it was handy not having to plan a route to get best benefit from the wind. I just found it stressful and usually stopped to eat sometime during the rush hour just to have a break from all the traffic. I also noticed that my speed didn't seem to be much better than my old routes and wanted to get back to riding the roads I used earlier in the year, just for something more interesting. Now that I was recovering from loss of sleep, I'd not want to spend as much time stopped if I could help it and my old routes did quite a good job at putting me on quieter roads when the traffic built up.
The trouble was, the weather. My routes work best with a SW wind that dies down in the evening but the wind just kept coming from the North or East so I stayed on the Leighton Buzzard by-pass, which had less climbing than my other routes. The other problem was ice. The Leighton Buzzard by-pass and my route to get there was all gritted roads which would be much safer when there's a risk of ice. Pus you learn where all the hazards are when you ride up and down the same bit of road all day, so as much as I wanted to get off the by-pass, I was stuck with it until the temperature went up a little bit and the wind changed to it's prevailing SWerly.
On 13th December, more bad luck. Someone drover their car into me at about 40-50mph from behind. No broken bones but my right leg was hit by their wing mirror, which came clean off and my right shin got tangled in my handlebars somehow. I also landed on my coccyx. The right hand drop of my handlebars was now like a 3rd tri-bar arm. I'd hate to think what my hand would have been like had I not been on my tri bars. If I'd been about a foot further into the road I'd most likely have been a lot worse off, possibly dead. So a relatively lucky escape, though it was a long wait at the roadside for an ambulance to take me to hospital for a checkup and because it was so cold my core temperature dropped down to 33 degrees. I was very close to hypothermia.
That was probably the nail in the coffin to my getting the men’s record. My injuries made me feel sleepy again and slowed me down. It was a different kind of sleepiness to what I was just getting over. I didn't feel so run down or exhausted, but it came up quite quickly. It meant that not only was I riding slower, I had to stop for a nap now and then. I never tried to ride through it because I knew that sleeping would help me recover faster.
After I was hit, I stopped using the Leighton Buzzard by-pass. The wind did more or less change to being more SWerly. I didn't rule out using it again if the conditions made it the best choice but I'd had enough of it and it wasn't really giving me any advantage that I could see.
I still had it in mind that I had my 3 attempts for the month record and was thinking of entering them at 1 week intervals, concurrently, until the end of my HAMR. I had nothing to lose. Either I wouldn't get back up to speed again but on the other hand, if I made a good recovery and if what I was doing to treat my sleep apnea worked well, I'd be kicking myself if I started going very well and never sent an entry in for the month record.
As if being hit by a car wasn't enough, just as I was starting to recover from being hit by the car a little bit, I came off on ice very hard.
I landed quite heavily on my left side. The next day I could hardly walk and leaned on my bike. To get on and off the bike I had to rest my leg on the top tube and slide it over. My new injury only made me slower and more sleepy. And while that was going on my tracker decided to give up on me and my GPSs were old and tired after so much use and abuse. So that all needed to be sorted out.
My speed never recovered. It took me about two weeks before I could walk reasonably comfortably again and get on and off my bike by swinging my leg over the top tube instead of sliding it over. Because of my injuries, I had to keep stopping for sleep now and then. I was never sleepy all the time, I just had to have a good nap when I did get sleepy and felt much better afterwards. In fact, I enjoyed the last two or three months as much as enjoyed the first few. I wasn't feeling as run down as I was a few months ago now that I was sleeping much better and caught up on sleep.
I did try riding a bit faster, but that meant that I stopped for sleep and rest more often, so I resigned to riding steady and taking a nap when I needed to. I also went back to taking caffeine to try and reduce hours spent not riding but had a watershed of 3pm so that my caffeine wouldn't intefere with my sleep at night so much.
With all the distractions from injuries, tiredness from injuries, sorting out trackers and GPSs, I only just got one entry in on time for the month record attempt. I was still hoping that I would recover from my injuries so that I could get back up to speed and riding more hours in the last month or even few weeks. But it never happened. My injuries never really healed properly and were always in the background. I did recover enough to get my riding hours back up to around 95 a week but doing that while having to take a nap during the day now and then caught up with me and I couldn't keep it up. I ended up tired again, though I think it was more physical tiredness from recovering from injuries than lack of sleep in general. Mentally I still felt good and although my speed was way down, I was enjoying the riding a lot more. I simply ran myself down until one night I was trying to get home and had to keep stopping for sleep. It was then that I knew that the game was up for me taking the men’s record so resigned myself to aiming for 73,000 for the year, an average of 200 miles a day. It also meant I wouldn't beat my month record.
I eased right off once I decided to aim for the 73,000 miles. I didn't worry too much if I fell behind by a few miles now and then because I thought that I could do a bit extra at the end. The other thing was that the weather forecast was looking bad for the last week with snow and strong winds. I didn't want to tire myself out too much before having to ride in bad weather. Also, the weather would either be not too bad, so I'd still be able to do a bit extra at the end, or it will be very bad and even if I'm in a good position to get the 73,000, very bad weather would probably spoil it so I wasn't going to batter myself just yet. Instead I just rode steady and tried to recover. I did get a bit behind what I needed for the 73,000.
In spite of riding fewer hours, I was still getting sleepy and my speed wasn't increasing. I was sleeping much more than I was in July and I was sleeping better as well. I can only guess that I was still recovering from my injuries and it was that what was making me so sleepy and slowing me down. I could certainly still feel that I had my injuries. They never really hurt, but they were definitely still there. It's the only thing that makes sense to me as to why I was feeling so much better, but was so slow and still getting sleepy.
Finally, the snow started to come. I set out to ride on local roads in case it got bad. After about 65 miles I got back home with the intention of eating, having a sleep while the roads got busy, then going out again after seeing what the road conditions were like. But I overslept and didn't go out again and as I slept the snow came down.
The next day, the roads were very hazardous with the snow and I was very tired. I certainly could have gone out and done a bit. But I doubt that I could have done much and didn't see any point in battering myself and taking risks in bad weather. If I wasn't so tired I'd have probably been more adventurous, but getting exhausted in the cold weather in very hazardous roads didn't seem wise. So for the last 3 days I didn't do anything more than push my bike in the snow for a few miles. On the last day I walked with my bike to a pub and spent the day there drinking tea and eating.
Not the result I wanted but with my sleeping disorder and injuries, I think I can say I gave it a good go and it could be argued that I might have at least done what I set out to do when I set off in 2015, to try and exceed 75,065 miles in a year. I was never expecting it to be easy and I would never have taken it easy. On the other hand, I probably didn't even realise how hard I was trying and I think that my biggest enemy was sleep apnea.

Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1005 on: March 18, 2018, 01:15:22 pm »

One of my reasons for riding was to get my name out in the public so I can do other big rides and get the sponsors etc because this is an expensive hobby/career.


That was always my feeling and it's the most sensible approach. I am not sure it is the most sensible of challenges to achieve your goals. I appreciate "generic mileage" involves a somewhat lower budget than cycling around the world a la Beaumont, but in return you get a lot less public profile too.

Personally I think the "round Britain in 22 days" record is well within your capabilities, it can be done with a reasonably low budget (I once worked it out at somewhere around 3 grand in its leanest, unsupported form). It's a record which is fresher in the mind of people and it's been brought back to the media attention by Guy Martin's failed attempt, so someone already laid the groundworks for you.
In my opinion, if you look for public profile, you will get a lot more by doing that in 20 days, than by "generic cycling" for 365... just a better return on investment.

When Sanders did it, it was all over the local and national news. He was very cunning and arranged for radio interviews along the way, but you could easily do that too and a lot better with modern social media.

Read Sanders book and see what you think

https://www.amazon.co.uk/22-Days-Around-Coast-Britain/dp/0946940037

I do have Mark B's round Britain record in mind, maybe 2019? I'd only do it if I can get at least the same sort of support. I wouldn't count on it though. Mark B is well known and well established so has very good support. He couldn't have done his round the world record without it and his round Britain ride was a practice run.
Plenty of other rides. There's always Trans Am or Tour Divide. I don't see the sense in setting off for a record attempt or race with an instant disadvantage, unless I'm absolutely sure I can get the record or am not riding to win a race. I doubt I could win Trans Am, but at least I'd be on a more level playing field riding an unsupported race.

woollypigs

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Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1006 on: March 18, 2018, 01:20:49 pm »
Mister Grinder, I don't know what to say, two words springs to mind - wow ! and nutter (you know the best kinda person a nutter can be). Top, brilliant, champion, fantastic, jolly good show, what what!

Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1007 on: March 18, 2018, 01:23:13 pm »
Given there is no record to go for and no other past rider to overtake, I really don't see the point of this challenge any more. 71,500 or 73,000 what difference does it make? It's just a number. With a week of sub zero temperature ahead, is it worth it?

Looking at his recent rides, the loss of pace is staggering and suggesting something is going on. Steve keeps blaming injuries, but I would call it chronic fatigue.
He should be able to average 16 mph with ease, but he barely manages 13. It's just not right... at no point I have ever been so slow on flattish terrain and if I was, I would probably stop immediately, before any damage becomes chronic or worse permanent. He probably badly needs a long period of rest and maybe to see his GP, the sooner the better

Apart from my beating my own UMCA age category record and getting a PB. I don't know if you've ridden a time trial, but would you slow down if you were well on to getting your PB just because you won't win the race or get the overall world record?

I'm not entirely sure what was slowing me down so much. I felt much less tired but I could definitely feel that I still had my injuries. I was getting sleepy but it was different to several months before. I expect that the weather didn't help my speed either but as you say, 13-14mph is very slow. Even now, if I go for a walk I can still feel where my shin got tangled up in my handlebars when I was hit by the car.
I will see my GP. Mainly to try and get to a sleep clinic. I'm curious about how bad my sleep apnea really is and hope I can get a CPAP off the NHS.

Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1008 on: March 18, 2018, 01:34:46 pm »
If you look at the year on Strava there has been a long slow decline in mileage. It looks very much like Steve has just got tierd. Not surprising really.

Steve

Sent from my E6653 using Tapatalk

That's right. My speed (and I reckon my fitness) did increase in the summer. I usually rode the first 200km in around 7hrs in Summer. But I was getting more tired and riding for fewer hours.
I did pick up again after I realised that I had apnea. My mileage just started to creep up again, then I got run over.

Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1009 on: March 18, 2018, 01:40:10 pm »
If you look at TGs most impressive strength ...the ability to cycle hills over big distance with incredible efficiency.   I would say the round the coast of Britain record is the one to go for.   Either that or some big cross continent records that have climbing built in.

I agree... although the record is 22 days for 4800 miles, so going for 20 means 240 miles a day... he definitively needs serious speed if he wants to get some sleep!!
Sanders was arguably a quicker cyclist and a much younger one!

Well, I did manage 236mpd for 30 days with sleep apnea and without a support crew. So perhaps sorting out sleep issues, having a support crew, a lighter bike with no luggage (Round Britain will be hilly, not like the flat roads I was riding) and get my power-weight ratio up a bit more, then who knows...

Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1010 on: March 18, 2018, 01:43:41 pm »
Wasn't there a post somewhere by Steve saying he wanted to join Idai in a LEJOGLE record attempt in the summer using a Morpheus tandem?

I'm eager to know what's the reason behind this choice of machine. And who's going to sit on the recumbent end?

A

It'd be more of a challenge, more in the spirit of the "Longest Ride" (It would be for me on that machine) and more fun.
It's best if the smallest/lightest rider goes on the front. I have had heavier riders than me on the front. It's not easy!

Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1011 on: March 18, 2018, 02:06:32 pm »

I do have Mark B's round Britain record in mind, maybe 2019? I'd only do it if I can get at least the same sort of support. I wouldn't count on it though. Mark B is well known and well established so has very good support. He couldn't have done his round the world record without it and his round Britain ride was a practice run.


I was referring to the older Nick Sanders 22 days around Britain (4800 miles in total). He had a crew of two mates in a support car with a spare bike. Spent most nights in either B&Bs or campsites.
I think if you plan something in the summer, maybe with the idea of finishing just before school holidays to avoid the worst traffic along the coast, it shouldn't be difficult to enrol o couple of friends for what should be a pleasant car trip for them.

I don't think MB's 14 days 3500 miles "round Britain" is a record in its own right. It certainly is a long way in a very short time, but it seems a bit short of mileage to be THE "round the coast of Britain" record.

Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1012 on: March 18, 2018, 02:09:06 pm »
Oops.

2000-2014 is miles - the details list both miles and km.

Clanged on the points, 63600 is km = 39750 miles.

Total "only" 285,478.

I wonder whether Steve has a record of his other miles.

Not really but I reckon I'm on over half a million for my whole lifetime. I could probably just about get into the 300,000 mile club if they accept Audax results and some of my old Audax Mileater diaries plus Strava. I just don't have the inclination.

Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1013 on: March 18, 2018, 02:13:57 pm »

I do have Mark B's round Britain record in mind, maybe 2019? I'd only do it if I can get at least the same sort of support. I wouldn't count on it though. Mark B is well known and well established so has very good support. He couldn't have done his round the world record without it and his round Britain ride was a practice run.


I was referring to the older Nick Sanders 22 days around Britain (4800 miles in total). He had a crew of two mates in a support car with a spare bike. Spent most nights in either B&Bs or campsites.
I think if you plan something in the summer, maybe with the idea of finishing just before school holidays to avoid the worst traffic along the coast, it shouldn't be difficult to enrol o couple of friends for what should be a pleasant car trip for them.

I don't think MB's 14 days 3500 miles "round Britain" is a record in its own right. It certainly is a long way in a very short time, but it seems a bit short of mileage to be THE "round the coast of Britain" record.

I haven't even looked at the details of that ride. I'd rather do the Nick Sanders version if it really is that different. It sounds like a more interesting ride with steep hills and narrow lanes. I'd have a pretty big advantage as well with a GPS and better lights.

Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1014 on: March 18, 2018, 02:25:43 pm »

I do have Mark B's round Britain record in mind, maybe 2019? I'd only do it if I can get at least the same sort of support. I wouldn't count on it though. Mark B is well known and well established so has very good support. He couldn't have done his round the world record without it and his round Britain ride was a practice run.


I was referring to the older Nick Sanders 22 days around Britain (4800 miles in total). He had a crew of two mates in a support car with a spare bike. Spent most nights in either B&Bs or campsites.
I think if you plan something in the summer, maybe with the idea of finishing just before school holidays to avoid the worst traffic along the coast, it shouldn't be difficult to enrol o couple of friends for what should be a pleasant car trip for them.

I don't think MB's 14 days 3500 miles "round Britain" is a record in its own right. It certainly is a long way in a very short time, but it seems a bit short of mileage to be THE "round the coast of Britain" record.

I haven't even looked at the details of that ride. I'd rather do the Nick Sanders version if it really is that different. It sounds like a more interesting ride with steep hills and narrow lanes. I'd have a pretty big advantage as well with a GPS and better lights.

And don't forget the gears! He had a 42 x 21 or something like that to go up Bealach Na Ba... :P
I don't think he did much night riding... he did it in summer, so light for 16-18 hours a day, but yes, GPS helps immensely. His book is not very informative re. the details of the route, there is just a very generic map on it and a breakdown for each day with the key towns he went through. Surely there must be an "official" route of some description.
Guy Martin tried in December 2016... I think he lasted a week or so before his Achilles gave up, but must have planned the route very carefully and I am sure would be happy to pass on that information to you if you found a way to contact him...

Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1015 on: March 18, 2018, 11:44:28 pm »
good to have back Steve! i've read your account while sitting on a turbo today - you went through a lot of hardship (in addition to all the miles ridden). i don't know / can't think of anyone else with such determination and mental fortitude. massive well done and good luck in your future challenges and adventures!

Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1016 on: March 19, 2018, 10:20:07 am »
Huge congratulations Steve, plus big thanks for the updates and answers, much appreciated (as is all of your writing).

We can now be less worried about how the recovery is going, sounds like you are handling another "interesting" time very well.

JamesBradbury

  • The before-ride picture is even worse
    • James Thinks
Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1017 on: March 24, 2018, 09:09:07 am »
Took me a while, but really enjoyed reading your report. Very interesting to hear about your thinking and strategies. Thanks for writing it.

Hugely impressed with your result in some very challenging circumstances. I hope the driver who hit you was appropriately dealt with by the police, but I can understand that not being your top priority at the time and it's lucky that you weren't more seriously injured.

Good luck with your next adventure and hope to see you on the road sometime.

Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1018 on: April 14, 2018, 12:59:49 am »


nobody has ever heard of Amanda Coker, before or after... it begs the question... why?


Plenty of people over here in the states have heard of Amanda since she finished her HAMR. She's raced in 5 TT's so far this year and she's won them all, setting track records on every course she's raced. She just won the State of Florida Time Trial Championship this past weekend where she rode a 40:21 in a 30k (27.7 mph) and beat all the women (and most of the men), including pro's.

Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1019 on: April 14, 2018, 07:36:08 pm »


nobody has ever heard of Amanda Coker, before or after... it begs the question... why?


Plenty of people over here in the states have heard of Amanda since she finished her HAMR. She's raced in 5 TT's so far this year and she's won them all, setting track records on every course she's raced. She just won the State of Florida Time Trial Championship this past weekend where she rode a 40:21 in a 30k (27.7 mph) and beat all the women (and most of the men), including pro's.
.

Plenty? Out of 250 million how many do you think? A few thousand at best IMO.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1020 on: April 14, 2018, 09:35:13 pm »


Plenty? Out of 250 million how many do you think? A few thousand at best IMO.

y'know, that's really uncalled for. Whether you meant it that way or not it comes over as denigrating what is truly an astonishing accomplishment, which I'm sure you didn't mean to. You have no ***** idea how many have now heard of her - a simple google shows her story was picked up by just about every cycling site, and many sporting sites. You live in the US these days? Any idea if she's been on local TV, radio?

Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1021 on: April 15, 2018, 10:17:15 am »
Besides, who’s to say she did it for fame? Whosatthewheel’s question – why? – is churlish and anyway trite. It could be applied to everything anyone has ever done.

Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1022 on: April 15, 2018, 10:45:30 am »
Back to AC... I don't think she did it because she wanted to loop a circuit for 12+ hours a day for 365 consecutive days... clearly she did it because she wanted that record. Why people want records? You can find a million reasons, but ultimately they all boil down to fame and notoriety, which on occasions can be turned into cash, on others less so.
What I said earlier is that the return on investment for that particular effort is pretty poor. A greater level of notoriety (and more money?) can be achieved without the need to invest so much time. This is a fact, I don't think you can realistically argue with that.

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1023 on: April 15, 2018, 11:14:10 am »
This is a fact, I don't think you can realistically argue with that.

Maybe, just maybe, there are alternative facts...
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Re: Another go .. TG??
« Reply #1024 on: April 15, 2018, 11:19:23 am »
Back to AC... I don't think she did it because she wanted to loop a circuit for 12+ hours a day for 365 consecutive days... clearly she did it because she wanted that record. Why people want records? You can find a million reasons, but ultimately they all boil down to fame and notoriety, which on occasions can be turned into cash, on others less so.
What I said earlier is that the return on investment for that particular effort is pretty poor. A greater level of notoriety (and more money?) can be achieved without the need to invest so much time. This is a fact, I don't think you can realistically argue with that.

You don't have the faintest idea about Amanda's motivation, do you, so I really have no idea why you are persisting with this line of thought, which I for one find dismissive and slightly offensive.