Author Topic: Teenagers (not) working  (Read 9916 times)

Teenagers (not) working
« on: July 07, 2016, 09:27:37 am »
The lad has just completed his GCSEs. He'll do well, having worked hard. Does loads of sporting stuff and is very sociable. He's also off to Reading Fest this Summer and Sixth Form in Sept.

However, he has never had a paid job. How much pressure would you put on a teen to get a job? Is it important that they do? Is it an essential life skill to have worked as a teen? I ask as a feel a tad guilty as I told him off very firmly yesterday for not trying hard enough.

My concern is that if he doesn't pull his finger out now, Summer will be over and he'll be on the A level/Sixth Form activity treadmill, and may end up at Uni having never worked. He's a decent kid but I don't want him spoilt. We live in SW London so the region is not short of jobs.

Karla

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Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2016, 09:37:10 am »
He's got another two summers during sixth form to work before going to uni, give the guy a break!

Jaded

  • The Codfather
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Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2016, 09:40:34 am »
Yes, help him get something. GCSE might be a bit early, but a good start. The process of writing a CV, however short, then traipsing round potential employers and getting rejected is good experience. Ours did volunteering in a charity shop, and an old folks home, working in restaurants, selling raffle tickets at the local football club, putting up market stalls, then progressing to being registered at the local temp agency and doing cleaning, labouring, etc.
Working with people, things, money, etc is all good experience. Also it gives them more money and things to fill the CV out with.
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2016, 09:55:42 am »
My daughter worked in a local café and the village pub and my son washed up at the pub for 4 years.  Both learnt a lot about working with other people and dealing with customers and it gave them a sense of responsibility, it did them both a lot of good.  It also extended my son's vocabulary, although not in the areas that my wife approved and taught him about the perils of alcohol - the chef was an alcoholic.  It taught them that a good boss does value reliable hard-working staff - my daughter used to get plenty of extra shifts in the holidays while other girls complained they never got anything extra - guess which ones turned up on time for work and never messed the boss around and which ones didn't.  All essential life skills.  Plus it taught them that it's worth putting in a bit of effort at school so that you don't have to spend the rest of your life working behind a bar.

Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2016, 10:06:16 am »
I agree with Little Jim

Out of the 6 kids/stepkids, 4 have worked before they were 18. It has done those 4 a load of good.

I don't think a lot of pressure is warranted, and the job needn't be much. However, it is a very good experience to earn a bit but also to learn about *having* to get somewhere on time etc (and for your own benefit/money).
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2016, 10:12:08 am »
We encouraged our son to work in the village pub from as soon as he was old enough (14 I think). He did it until he left for uni. One night a week and one afternoon at weekends to start with and when he was 17-18 sometimes he did more on a weekend if they were short. Washing up to start with then also being a waiter.
He didn't enjoy it much but it did give him a respect for money and gave him confidence in dealing with people.
He saved up to buy his own car unlike a lot of his mates who just had one given to them and I think he appreciates it more (I paid insurance for him etc).
Its also nice for them to have their own money that they can spend on what they want without justifying it to their parents. As I said my lad was pretty good about saving but he like to blow his tips on computer games etc.
 
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Oscar's dad

  • aka Septimus Fitzwilliam Beauregard Partridge
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2016, 10:20:10 am »
We are in the same situation, our 16year old has just finished GCSEs and is now bumming around the house.  She has the tendency to be lazy and apathetic so it's going to be interesting to see what her results are like (a day in August I am dreading).  Pressure about getting a job has already been brought to bear and will increase if she does nothing.

A job will do our teen a power of good as she is very shy and doesn't like stepping outside her small comfort zone.  But, deep down she is a smashing kid and put in the right work environment she is likely to blossom like the biggest flowery thing you've ever seen.

Pancho

  • لَا أَعْبُدُ مَا تَعْبُدُونَ
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #7 on: July 07, 2016, 10:27:06 am »
Tricky one.

Whereas our generation worked from a pretty early age, school age jobs have been practically legislated out of existence. The result is, as you say, young ones reaching university - or beyond - having never worked or earned in their lives. No concept of the benefits and challenges of one of the most important aspects of adult life. Fine if you have a trust fund to inherit but a very poor start in life for the rest of us.

I have two sprogs. The eldest was like yours - and like you - I worried. However, the first thing she did at university was get a part time job. She loved it so much she jacked in university (I approved as I'm not a big fan of the university for all mantra).

The second worked weekends and holidays from a very young age. She's still at school so we'll have to wait and see if the work ethic holds into later life.

Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #8 on: July 07, 2016, 10:36:30 am »
Another one with a teen of the same age. She's been doing a lot of bumming around, and has done the whole of Netflix and not much else, so we have been nagging her a little bit to get a job. She is the least streetwise person of anyone I know, her younger sister often seems so much older, so I genuinely thought it would do her good to actually take responsibility for something in her life- which she just doesn't currently do. Maybe that's been bad parenting, I dunno, but she really expects everything done for her.

Anyway, I disagree about school age jobs being legislated out of existence, because there are plenty around near us. The most common way to get your mitts on one seems to be through FB groups. She had her first interview on Tuesday, and started a job at a fish and chip shop on Tuesday night!!! 2 shifts done, and she's actually enjoying it, I really think it will be great for her, and increase confidence. She's had a very difficult year with some hard medical stuff to deal with, which have definitely affected exams/school, and it's good she's got something that can get her out of her comfort zone, and give her money to spend on whatever she wants. It's a 1 minute walk from our house, so hopefully she'll keep it up through 6th form as well.

Wowbagger

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Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #9 on: July 07, 2016, 10:39:08 am »
I have four children all of whom can be held up as conflicting role models (of a sort).

My daughters both worked in their school hols, one with a school friend in the local park's café, taking the piss out of the clients as they served drinks ("Buggeremup?" "I beg your pardon?" "Mug or a cup?"). T'other one worked at Waitrose and earned a fair bit of cash. She is the most driven of all our children.

Younger son took the laid-back approach. Finished A levels and took a gap year, doing nothing other than becoming one of the world's top 20 at "Unreal Tournament", started Uni at the age of 20 (a good move: I was only just 18 when I left home and suffered considerably from home-sickness) and he declared to me early on "I am going to take a Swedish wife!". Well, they are not married, but after 10 years collecting degrees, and living together for a good deal of that time, they are each titled "Dr" and her family is fabulously wealthy.

Dez is Dez. There is no other.
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Oscar's dad

  • aka Septimus Fitzwilliam Beauregard Partridge
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #10 on: July 07, 2016, 10:50:12 am »
Another one with a teen of the same age. She's been doing a lot of bumming around, and has done the whole of Netflix and not much else, so we have been nagging her a little bit to get a job. She is the least streetwise person of anyone I know, her younger sister often seems so much older, so I genuinely thought it would do her good to actually take responsibility for something in her life- which she just doesn't currently do. Maybe that's been bad parenting, I dunno, but she really expects everything done for her.

I think our daughters might be clones  ;D

Pancho

  • لَا أَعْبُدُ مَا تَعْبُدُونَ
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #11 on: July 07, 2016, 10:54:01 am »
Anyway, I disagree about school age jobs being legislated out of existence, because there are plenty around near us. The most common way to get your mitts on one seems to be through FB groups.

Nope. No work *at all* until 13 and then only part time. My youngest got round it by working illegally. A criminal £5/hr is still £5/hr.

Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #12 on: July 07, 2016, 11:48:12 am »
But 13 is a school age job? And part time is still a job?

But yes if you mean full time work at 12- yes, errr, I guess that doesn't exist!


Eccentrica Gallumbits

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Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #13 on: July 07, 2016, 12:38:05 pm »
I had a paper round for a couple of years when I was at secondary school, and jacked it in as soon as I was old enough to get shop work. Worked in a Saxone concession at Burtons for 4 hours on Saturdays, then did Thursday evenings and Saturday afternoons on the tills at the Co-op supermarket, more in the holidays. My parents encouraged me to work, but not at the expense of my education. I didn't have term time jobs when I was at college; our course was too intense, but my summer jobs were child-minding (worst job I ever had), waitressing and care home work.

My parents were very clear that as long as I was in full-time education, I didn't have to pay any contribution to the household, and they would keep me clothed and shod, but anything else I had to pay for myself.

My brother did bugger all.
My feminist marxist dialectic brings all the boys to the yard.


Oscar's dad

  • aka Septimus Fitzwilliam Beauregard Partridge
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #14 on: July 07, 2016, 12:41:37 pm »
I worked from about 13 onwards, I had to get a work permit signed by my school.  I mostly worked in supermarkets.  I think teens should be working part-time for all the reasons stated above.

fboab

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Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #15 on: July 07, 2016, 12:48:08 pm »
I've always worked, from as soon as I could. I had expensive habits.
Sons worked during 6th form, daughters did not. They all like financial independence, but for No2Daughter that came from her Dad. :facepalm:
There's nothing like cutting off income to persuade them to work.
TSS is not Total Sex Score, Chris!

Pancho

  • لَا أَعْبُدُ مَا تَعْبُدُونَ
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #16 on: July 07, 2016, 12:52:31 pm »
My child labour history was farm work from about 10 through to 15 or so. Pretty hard, cold, and relentless. For some reason, I particularly disliked turkey killing and plucking. But paid for my computing habit (ZX81!). Then an abattoir. That actual work was the grimmest of grim but there was a good team spirit. But it paid for my first ever new bike. Then university and office jobs with temp agencies. Bloody fantastic - free coffee and no throat cutting to do.

Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #17 on: July 07, 2016, 03:03:51 pm »
I've always worked too :) My first job was in the village bakery when I was 14, I got £2.57 an hour :)

Then I worked in the local Italian restaurant, still at the bakery, and also newsagents when I was at 6th form. Looking back I'm not sure how I did that amongst all the music stuff I used to do as well (and all the drinking at 6th form ;) ) Oh the joys of being young I guess! That restaurant was great money, the tips were more than the wages.

I wouldn't even think of asking teen1 to make a contribution to the house while she was in full time education, it's just pocket money, but some independence is definitely beneficial for her.

TimC

  • Old blerk sometimes onabike.
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #18 on: July 07, 2016, 03:14:40 pm »
Anyway, I disagree about school age jobs being legislated out of existence, because there are plenty around near us. The most common way to get your mitts on one seems to be through FB groups.

Nope. No work *at all* until 13 and then only part time. My youngest got round it by working illegally. A criminal £5/hr is still £5/hr.

Blimey. No chimneys you could throw them up from 5am to 10pm at 10? What is the world coming to? (And you tell the young people of today that, etc, etc!).

Both mine worked from around 15-16, and both enjoyed it. One in a local hairdresser, the other in the local pub and more recently as a lifeguard in the local leisure centre. The one at university (who did the hairdresser job) hasn't even considered working while at uni, so I need to have a word with her! The other is off to join the Army.


Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #19 on: July 07, 2016, 03:17:58 pm »
Life is getting increasingly harder fro the working population - by the time he is retiring age he will probably be 100 years old and have been stressed out for much of it.  Do you really need him to work?  I'd be strongly inclined to give him a break, otherwise.

Peter

hellymedic

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Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #20 on: July 07, 2016, 05:49:31 pm »
I've always worked too :) My first job was in the village bakery when I was 14, I got £2.57 an hour :)

There's inflation for you! I was paid 25p/hr babysitting for a lecturer at university and I was rather older than 14!

Eccentrica Gallumbits

  • Rock 'n' roll and brew, rock 'n' roll and brew...
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #21 on: July 07, 2016, 06:44:36 pm »
I got £1.20 per week for a 6 mornings a week paper round!
My feminist marxist dialectic brings all the boys to the yard.


Jaded

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  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #22 on: July 07, 2016, 07:05:06 pm »
I got 25p an hour working on a building site in December.
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Wowbagger

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Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #23 on: July 07, 2016, 07:42:25 pm »
I got my first job when I was in primary school. The local farmer drove his tractor up and down a field full of potatoes whilst a device turfed the tubers out of the ground. My sister and I collected them, along with many other villagers, and put them in bags. We were paid by the bag.

"A good woman can pick 50 bag a day," said Cyril Wilby, farm hand extraordinaire. His wife did indeed pick 50 bag a day. My sister and I were lucky if we managed 5.
Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #24 on: July 07, 2016, 10:13:33 pm »
Thanks for the comments all. Very useful.

I told the lad this morning:

"I don't care if you don't get a job as long as you try your best to get one. And if you try I'll buy you that ticket to go and see Harelquins at Twickenham for the London Double Header."

I thought that experience of trying at this age would, almost, be as actually working (as a poster above has already noted).

Off he went and asked around a few cafes in Kingston, having tweaked his CV (which had already taken 2 months to complete). Has an interview with the owner of one cafe on Sunday.

I bought him that ticket.