Author Topic: Furrybootoon?  (Read 2384 times)

Furrybootoon?
« on: 20 February, 2024, 09:19:02 pm »
C'mon you lot.. I have lurked around yacf long enough to know that Furrybootoon* is err..  Edinburgh?, but why please?

* Google nuffink, dunno about chat gpt

Tim Hall

  • Victoria is my queen
Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #1 on: 20 February, 2024, 09:27:12 pm »
<placeholder for a pingu>

Aberdeen.
Meanwhile, I belive it's a dialect/local accent enquiry of where a person comes from "Furry boot y’ frae" (wherabouts you from?).
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #2 on: 20 February, 2024, 09:28:24 pm »
This.

Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #3 on: 20 February, 2024, 09:30:46 pm »
Right country wrong city!

Tim Hall

  • Victoria is my queen
Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #4 on: 20 February, 2024, 09:36:03 pm »
See also the lead singer of Popular Beat Combo The Rezillos, Fay Fife.  Born Sheilagh Hynd, she comes from, umm, Fife. 
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Pingu

  • Put away those fiery biscuits!
  • Mrs Pingu's domestique
    • the Igloo
Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #5 on: 20 February, 2024, 09:36:56 pm »
I believe it's a Billy Connollyism.

Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #6 on: 20 February, 2024, 09:47:03 pm »
I believe it's a Billy Connollyism.

Probably.
But within the last 10 yrs I was on an early morning bus from Peterhead to Fraserburgh and wanting to get off at the village of Crimond, which has all off a 300 metre main street. 
As I rose to leave. The driver said "Furra aboots?" and then stopped where I asked.

Pingu

  • Put away those fiery biscuits!
  • Mrs Pingu's domestique
    • the Igloo
Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #7 on: 20 February, 2024, 09:52:46 pm »
Yeah, to be clear, I meant 'Furrybootoon' not 'far aboot' which is defo a Doric phrase.

Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #8 on: 20 February, 2024, 10:12:01 pm »
I presume you have to survive on whale blubber most of the time?
And illuminate the dark six months of the year with whale-oil lamps, whilst wrapped up in freshly-clubbed seal-skins?

ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #9 on: 20 February, 2024, 10:41:49 pm »
I presume you have to survive on whale blubber most of the time?
And illuminate the dark six months of the year with whale-oil lamps, whilst wrapped up in freshly-clubbed seal-skins?
Thats only at the posh hotels
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens

Kim

  • Timelord
    • Fediverse
Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #10 on: 20 February, 2024, 11:50:55 pm »
The less posh ones set fire to a whole penguin[1].


[1] Hunkin, T. and Garrod, R. (1988)

Cudzoziemiec

  • Ride adventurously and stop for a brew.
Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #11 on: 21 February, 2024, 11:28:28 am »
Yeah, to be clear, I meant 'Furrybootoon' not 'far aboot' which is defo a Doric phrase.
So if Doric is Northeast Scots, and Aberdeen is definitely NE Scotland, does that mean Aberdonian is a dialect within a dialect?

The origin of the term Doric given in Wikipedia is interesting:
Quote
The term "Doric" was formerly used to refer to all dialects of Lowland Scots, but during the twentieth century it became increasingly associated with Mid Northern Scots.[4]

The name possibly originated as a jocular reference to the Doric dialect of the Ancient Greek language. Greek Dorians lived in Laconia, including Sparta, and other more rural areas, and were alleged by the ancient Greeks to have spoken laconically and in a language thought harsher in tone and more phonetically conservative than the Attic spoken in Athens. Doric Greek was used for some of the verses spoken by the chorus in Greek tragedy.

According to The Oxford Companion to English Literature:

"Since the Dorians were regarded as uncivilised by the Athenians, 'Doric' came to mean 'rustic' in English, and was applied particularly to the language of Northumbria and the Lowlands of Scotland and also to the simplest of the three orders in architecture."[5]
18th-century Scots writers such as Allan Ramsay justified their use of Scots (instead of English) by comparing it to the use of Ancient Greek Doric by Theocritus.[6] English became associated with Attic.[7]
Riding a concrete path through the nebulous and chaotic future.

Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #12 on: 21 February, 2024, 04:44:55 pm »
On the subject of Doric, and this being a cycling forum and all...

My cycling routes often take me through the small village of Rhynie.
Every time I end up there, I get earwormed by an old comedy sketch by an outfit that went under the name of Scotland the What.
I found a recording of it on Youtube...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVBPU_y_9S8

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #13 on: 21 February, 2024, 05:13:37 pm »
I clicked that and got something in Norwegian.  ;D
It is simpler than it looks.

Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #14 on: 21 February, 2024, 05:21:27 pm »
Yeah, to be clear, I meant 'Furrybootoon' not 'far aboot' which is defo a Doric phrase.
So if Doric is Northeast Scots, and Aberdeen is definitely NE Scotland, does that mean Aberdonian is a dialect within a dialect?

The origin of the term Doric given in Wikipedia is interesting:
Quote
The term "Doric" was formerly used to refer to all dialects of Lowland Scots, but during the twentieth century it became increasingly associated with Mid Northern Scots.[4]

The name possibly originated as a jocular reference to the Doric dialect of the Ancient Greek language. Greek Dorians lived in Laconia, including Sparta, and other more rural areas, and were alleged by the ancient Greeks to have spoken laconically and in a language thought harsher in tone and more phonetically conservative than the Attic spoken in Athens. Doric Greek was used for some of the verses spoken by the chorus in Greek tragedy.

According to The Oxford Companion to English Literature:

"Since the Dorians were regarded as uncivilised by the Athenians, 'Doric' came to mean 'rustic' in English, and was applied particularly to the language of Northumbria and the Lowlands of Scotland and also to the simplest of the three orders in architecture."[5]
18th-century Scots writers such as Allan Ramsay justified their use of Scots (instead of English) by comparing it to the use of Ancient Greek Doric by Theocritus.[6] English became associated with Attic.[7]

'Scots' isn't a dialect, it is a language.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Cudzoziemiec

  • Ride adventurously and stop for a brew.
Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #15 on: 21 February, 2024, 05:36:21 pm »
Yeah, to be clear, I meant 'Furrybootoon' not 'far aboot' which is defo a Doric phrase.
So if Doric is Northeast Scots, and Aberdeen is definitely NE Scotland, does that mean Aberdonian is a dialect within a dialect?

The origin of the term Doric given in Wikipedia is interesting:
Quote
The term "Doric" was formerly used to refer to all dialects of Lowland Scots, but during the twentieth century it became increasingly associated with Mid Northern Scots.[4]

The name possibly originated as a jocular reference to the Doric dialect of the Ancient Greek language. Greek Dorians lived in Laconia, including Sparta, and other more rural areas, and were alleged by the ancient Greeks to have spoken laconically and in a language thought harsher in tone and more phonetically conservative than the Attic spoken in Athens. Doric Greek was used for some of the verses spoken by the chorus in Greek tragedy.

According to The Oxford Companion to English Literature:

"Since the Dorians were regarded as uncivilised by the Athenians, 'Doric' came to mean 'rustic' in English, and was applied particularly to the language of Northumbria and the Lowlands of Scotland and also to the simplest of the three orders in architecture."[5]
18th-century Scots writers such as Allan Ramsay justified their use of Scots (instead of English) by comparing it to the use of Ancient Greek Doric by Theocritus.[6] English became associated with Attic.[7]

'Scots' isn't a dialect, it is a language.
At least since 1999 (cf Weinreich) !

I understood that Wikipedia page to say that Doric is a dialect of Scots, and Pingu earlier pointed out Aberdeen as having its own dialect within Doric.
Riding a concrete path through the nebulous and chaotic future.

Pingu

  • Put away those fiery biscuits!
  • Mrs Pingu's domestique
    • the Igloo
Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #16 on: 21 February, 2024, 05:39:56 pm »
Did I? I didn't mean to...

barakta

  • Bastard lovechild of Yomiko Readman and Johnny 5
Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #17 on: 21 February, 2024, 05:40:18 pm »
I clicked that and got something in Norwegian.  ;D

I need lipreading to parse that as I can't tell if I'd have a chance with lipreading or if it would still be beyond me.

I remember my Glaswegian Grandad showing me some of his videos of different-Scottish-dialect comedy etc on VHS in the years before he got dementia. It's how I discovered the Corries.

Mrs Pingu

  • Who ate all the pies? Me
    • Twitter
Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #18 on: 21 February, 2024, 05:56:58 pm »
To me
Aberdonian = a person from Aberdeen, not a dialect.

For those interested in random Doric stuffs https://media.scotslanguage.com/library/document/RGU_Doric_Dictionary.pdf
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

Bluebottle

  • Everybody's gotta be somewhere
Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #19 on: 21 February, 2024, 06:37:23 pm »
The in laws are from farming just outside Aiberdeen. I got smacked for suggesting that the rural Aberdeen accent sounds like a turkey being sick. I have since held my piece.

Having said that, they were occasionally happy to recite the phrase, used when you don't know which shoe should be worn on which foot, "fit fit fits fit fit?"
Dieu, je vous soupçonne d'être un intellectuel de gauche.

FGG #5465

Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #20 on: 21 February, 2024, 09:51:42 pm »
I'm pleased to have started such an erudite and diverse discussion.
Do please continue for many more pages..

Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #21 on: 21 February, 2024, 10:54:15 pm »
I've looked at the Doric Dictionary; some words also occur in Scots; some were in daily use in Godzone in the sixties. They may still be used, but I escaped fifty years ago, so have no current knowledge.

Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #22 on: 22 February, 2024, 09:39:52 am »
Yeah, to be clear, I meant 'Furrybootoon' not 'far aboot' which is defo a Doric phrase.
So if Doric is Northeast Scots, and Aberdeen is definitely NE Scotland, does that mean Aberdonian is a dialect within a dialect?

The origin of the term Doric given in Wikipedia is interesting:
Quote
The term "Doric" was formerly used to refer to all dialects of Lowland Scots, but during the twentieth century it became increasingly associated with Mid Northern Scots.[4]

The name possibly originated as a jocular reference to the Doric dialect of the Ancient Greek language. Greek Dorians lived in Laconia, including Sparta, and other more rural areas, and were alleged by the ancient Greeks to have spoken laconically and in a language thought harsher in tone and more phonetically conservative than the Attic spoken in Athens. Doric Greek was used for some of the verses spoken by the chorus in Greek tragedy.

According to The Oxford Companion to English Literature:

"Since the Dorians were regarded as uncivilised by the Athenians, 'Doric' came to mean 'rustic' in English, and was applied particularly to the language of Northumbria and the Lowlands of Scotland and also to the simplest of the three orders in architecture."[5]
18th-century Scots writers such as Allan Ramsay justified their use of Scots (instead of English) by comparing it to the use of Ancient Greek Doric by Theocritus.[6] English became associated with Attic.[7]

'Scots' isn't a dialect, it is a language.
At least since 1999 (cf Weinreich) !

I understood that Wikipedia page to say that Doric is a dialect of Scots, and Pingu earlier pointed out Aberdeen as having its own dialect within Doric.

Wrong way round.

Scots is a dialect of Doric.

<i>Marmite slave</i>

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #23 on: 22 February, 2024, 10:15:17 am »
The in laws are from farming just outside Aiberdeen. I got smacked for suggesting that the rural Aberdeen accent sounds like a turkey being sick. I have since held my piece.

Having said that, they were occasionally happy to recite the phrase, used when you don't know which shoe should be worn on which foot, "fit fit fits fit fit?"

Unfortuantely that only works in text due to Scots orthography dying out in favour of "ach alddie jsut write whit ye think it soonds like in english"

"Quhat fit fits quhat fit?"

It covers the fact that in Scots there is a transition of pronunciation from Wit to Fit via Whit as you head north

T42

  • Apprentice geezer
Re: Furrybootoon?
« Reply #24 on: 22 February, 2024, 12:46:28 pm »
Whuckin' A.
I've dusted off all those old bottles and set them up straight