Author Topic: Grammar that makes you cringe  (Read 842749 times)

Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6725 on: 06 March, 2024, 03:39:55 pm »
Hmm, conflagration is a new word for me. Which is odd, because I do know deflagration.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Ride adventurously and stop for a brew.
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6726 on: 06 March, 2024, 03:40:50 pm »
Deflagration is a new word for me. Win-win!
Riding a concrete path through the nebulous and chaotic future.

rr

Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6727 on: 06 March, 2024, 03:41:06 pm »
Quote
let me get back to you momentarily

Seems in the USA momentarily means 'at any moment'.

Reading it is like chewing on a pumice stone.
As it has for many years in Somerset.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Ride adventurously and stop for a brew.
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6728 on: 06 March, 2024, 04:05:54 pm »
I thought it meant "in a moment" in USA.
Riding a concrete path through the nebulous and chaotic future.

T42

  • Apprentice geezer
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6729 on: 18 March, 2024, 03:46:29 pm »
Fed up reading and hearing people say "passed" when they mean "died".  I want "croaked" in my death notice if in English and "crevé" if in French.  The latter also applies to a flat tyre, so it'll be appropriate.
I've dusted off all those old bottles and set them up straight

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6730 on: 18 March, 2024, 09:16:35 pm »
Oooohh…. JPFROG in polite terms!
(click to show/hide)

Edited because I ‘lost’ my J...

T42

  • Apprentice geezer
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6731 on: 19 March, 2024, 11:12:44 am »
Not if you're on metformin.

PFROG is nice, though - looks like a qualification.
I've dusted off all those old bottles and set them up straight

barakta

  • Bastard lovechild of Yomiko Readman and Johnny 5
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6732 on: 20 March, 2024, 02:26:19 pm »
I hate "passed" and "passed away" too but I've had people (young) specifically ask me to replace "died" with passed away when I did some sharing of news about a disabled mutual dying suddenly a few years back. They felt "died" was too harsh and didn't like to read it.

Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6733 on: 20 March, 2024, 02:56:20 pm »
Quote
Chinese boats fire water at a Philippine vessel

Is that really the best verb?  I'd accept 'shoot', and recognise that 'squirt' doesn't really convey the pressure involved (firefighting equipment being used as an offensive weapon).
Fire as a verb is not necessarily connected with conflagration. It was used in archery contexts before the arrival of gunpowder in Europe. Nevertheless, "shoot" would seem more appropriate in this context.

Really?

Consensus among archery community is that 'loose' was the term used.

'fire' really doesn't make any sense in this context.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

T42

  • Apprentice geezer
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6734 on: 20 March, 2024, 04:21:55 pm »
I hate "passed" and "passed away" too but I've had people (young) specifically ask me to replace "died" with passed away when I did some sharing of news about a disabled mutual dying suddenly a few years back. They felt "died" was too harsh and didn't like to read it.

When the hospital called to tell us MrsT's mum had died the bloke was so flustered with trying to break it gently that he told me we could come when we liked to see her and collect her bougies (candles or spark-plugs) instead of bijoux (jewellery).
I've dusted off all those old bottles and set them up straight

barakta

  • Bastard lovechild of Yomiko Readman and Johnny 5
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6735 on: 20 March, 2024, 04:30:40 pm »
I don't envy anyone who has to break death news regularly, cos you probably do have to use shitty euphemisms otherwise you'd upset already distressed people.

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
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Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6736 on: 22 March, 2024, 04:44:56 pm »
Just ordered some Perfectly Good Gentleman's Mountain Bicycling shoes from (whisper it) Halfrauds*.  On their order tracking page:

Quote
On it's way

Garrotting is too good for them.

* if they turn out to be a Rubbish TV's Nice C Boardman is in a world of hurt, or at least libel
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Paul

  • L'enfer, c'est les autos.
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6737 on: 22 March, 2024, 05:06:44 pm »
Just ordered some Perfectly Good Gentleman's Mountain Bicycling shoes from (whisper it) Halfrauds*.  On their order tracking page:

Quote
On it's way

Garrotting is too good for them.

* if they turn out to be a Rubbish TV's Nice C Boardman is in a world of hurt, or at least libel

These ones? Please let me know how you get on with them. I bought these ones (review here), but I think I prefer the look of the Boardman ones.
What's so funny about peace, love and understanding?

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6738 on: 22 March, 2024, 06:10:00 pm »
Yes, the very orange ones.  Interzen sotp would approve.  They’re not going to see strenuous use, though.

Edit: they’re less thoroughly Trumpian in colour than I expected.  And each shoe weighs about 20g more than the pair they’re replacing.  Which probably explains a lot.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Wowbagger

  • Stout dipper
    • Stuff mostly about weather
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6739 on: 29 March, 2024, 08:03:32 pm »
Quote
Anne-Sophie Mutter Will Take a Break from Concertizing



AAAARGH!
Quote from: Dez
It doesn’t matter where you start. Just start.

citoyen

  • Occasionally rides a bike
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6740 on: 29 March, 2024, 08:13:32 pm »
Quote
Anne-Sophie Mutter Will Take a Break from Concertizing



AAAARGH!

Yeah - any fule kno it should be concertising with an S!
"The future's all yours, you lousy bicycles."

Wowbagger

  • Stout dipper
    • Stuff mostly about weather
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6741 on: 29 March, 2024, 08:14:31 pm »
Funnily enough, I thought that too!
Quote from: Dez
It doesn’t matter where you start. Just start.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Ride adventurously and stop for a brew.
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6742 on: 03 April, 2024, 09:56:05 am »
Quote
Chinese boats fire water at a Philippine vessel

Is that really the best verb?  I'd accept 'shoot', and recognise that 'squirt' doesn't really convey the pressure involved (firefighting equipment being used as an offensive weapon).
Fire as a verb is not necessarily connected with conflagration. It was used in archery contexts before the arrival of gunpowder in Europe. Nevertheless, "shoot" would seem more appropriate in this context.

Really?

Consensus among archery community is that 'loose' was the term used.

'fire' really doesn't make any sense in this context.
It's just something I read somewhere, can't remember where but it was more about the word 'fire' than about archery. But I don't think the use of 'loose' (or any other term) among archers would mean that 'fire' wasn't used in general contexts. For instance, military archers could loose their arrows at the opposing army, who could liken the experience to 'fire' and from there the word could spread (I'm just speculating, obviously). In any case 'loose' in this sense is a sort of archers' jargon for 'shoot' (which I still think would have been the better word to use when the 'projectile' is water).

Incidentally, the fire-ship* Pyronaut can sometimes be seen firing/shooting/loosing/projecting/squirting/etc water in Bristol docks. I think it's about 50 years since it was last in active service though.


*Not Drake's sort of fire-ship!
Riding a concrete path through the nebulous and chaotic future.

ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6743 on: 03 April, 2024, 10:13:14 am »
Deflagration is a new word for me. Win-win!

back in my early days as a young chemical engineer, and discussing deflagration vs detonation for a COMAH safety report a colleague and I had an e-mail thread "Acrylonitrile - Kaboom?"
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens

Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6744 on: 03 April, 2024, 01:21:32 pm »
This is getting back to my earlier comment about railway companies wanting us to "alight" their trains. Not sure it would stop them from prosecuting us afterwards...

T42

  • Apprentice geezer
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6745 on: 03 April, 2024, 03:23:39 pm »
This is getting back to my earlier comment about railway companies wanting us to "alight" their trains. Not sure it would stop them from prosecuting us afterwards...

Current grammatical trends require prepositions to be either inappropriate or missing.  No, not that appropriate, the real one.
I've dusted off all those old bottles and set them up straight

Cudzoziemiec

  • Ride adventurously and stop for a brew.
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6746 on: 03 April, 2024, 03:35:03 pm »
This is getting back to my earlier comment about railway companies wanting us to "alight" their trains. Not sure it would stop them from prosecuting us afterwards...

Current grammatical trends require prepositions to be either inappropriate or missing.  No, not that appropriate, the real one.
Due to misappropriation of its meaning, it is no longer appropriate to use the word 'inappropriate'.
Riding a concrete path through the nebulous and chaotic future.

Wombat

  • Is it supposed to hurt this much?
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6747 on: 03 April, 2024, 06:19:50 pm »
I hate "passed" and "passed away" too but I've had people (young) specifically ask me to replace "died" with passed away when I did some sharing of news about a disabled mutual dying suddenly a few years back. They felt "died" was too harsh and didn't like to read it.

When the hospital called to tell us MrsT's mum had died the bloke was so flustered with trying to break it gently that he told me we could come when we liked to see her and collect her bougies (candles or spark-plugs) instead of bijoux (jewellery).

I had the idiotic phone conversation with a bloke from Southampton General who was trying to tell me my mum had died in the period between his 0300 phone call to tell us she was heading toward the exit door of the departure lounge (my phrase, not his) and that moment, which was about 2 hours later. The guy had a very strong Indian accent, it was a crappy phone line from a busy, noisy hospital, I'm partially deaf, and I was a passenger in a small car moving at some speed between home in Mid-Wales, and Southampton.  In the end I just said to him "are you trying to tell me she's dead?", he said yes, and I said fine, we'll be there in 2-3 hours.  The hospital refrained from referring to her as having passed, but said there was a nurse with her when she died.  Thank you, lovely nurse! When we called in at the funeral directors later that day, we started with "please don't start with the sombre consoling stuff, we're actually relieved she's escaped at last, it was definitely what she wanted." We then just got on with the details very happily, and all went well. Dealing with her death whilst living 200 miles away was far less painful than dealing with her being "sort of alive" from that distance.  I absolutely hate the term "passed"!  BTW, I was amused when I realise "bougies" mean spark plugs, as well as candles. Nearly as amused as realising railway engine buffers are tampons.

I'm reading a book written by a USAnian funeral director.  He refers the dead person as "decedent". Eh?  Is that used here, as I always though they were referred to as "the deceased"?

Footnote: on the day of my mum's funeral, the Queen died.  Sad, but didn't affect us.  The hotel was also host to a large wedding party, who seemed to be lovely people.  I felt sad for them, thinking of years in the future when someone asked what was memorable about their wedding day, and having to say "the Queen died".
Wombat

Cudzoziemiec

  • Ride adventurously and stop for a brew.
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6748 on: 03 April, 2024, 06:34:59 pm »
I can't remember now if it was the funeral director or the registrar of deaths, or possibly they both used the same phrase, who said, after my dad died, he was "Pleased to meet me and sorry it had to be under such circumstances". You're a funeral director, you meet people "under such circumstances" every day, and I'd probably never meet you under any others!
Riding a concrete path through the nebulous and chaotic future.

T42

  • Apprentice geezer
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6749 on: 04 April, 2024, 08:26:28 am »
I can't remember now if it was the funeral director or the registrar of deaths, or possibly they both used the same phrase, who said, after my dad died, he was "Pleased to meet me and sorry it had to be under such circumstances". You're a funeral director, you meet people "under such circumstances" every day, and I'd probably never meet you under any others!

And besides, it's how they make their money.
I've dusted off all those old bottles and set them up straight